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Six Flags Great Adventure (SFGAdv) Discussion Thread


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Yeah, at this point I instinctively put my head forward on pretty much any coaster with over the shoulder restraints so there are very few rides where you can't avoid headbanging and it wasn't an issue on Lantern but still, I hate the amount of pressure it puts on your legs. It's just not a comfortable or enjoyable experience.

Edited by coasterbill
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Bro, Jersey legalized pot not crack. Put it down.

OH. MY. GOD. A SPIRAL MAINTENANCE STAIRCASE!!!!!! I CAN'T WAIT TO WALK DOWN IT!!!!  

That’s correct. If you’re in the state for less than 24 hours you’re perfectly in compliance with the quarantine but be warned that if you’re there for 24 hours and one second you’re not and you’ll be

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Jesus Christ, well, that explains why the Nitro team was being super anal about height checks yesterday. My kiddo already had been measured at the beginning of the day and had a green 54" wristband on, and the person at the gate made him take off his winter hat and hoods to measure up again... then after they gave him the thumbs up and we were about to board, someone ELSE walked up and said they needed to do the same thing. I get the safety requirements but at that point it was a little overkill.

 

I try to always give the benefit of the doubt when people moan about ride-ops and just say they're doing their jobs but I hate this. IF you've taken the time to get your child checked at guest services or wherever and had a wristband attached confirming the height that should then be the end of it. I feel like either here or twitter or facebook there was a TR a while back where some-one got measured at another Six Flags and the ride-op denied them and people were booing at the hold-up. I can't remember all the facts but I remember feeling horrified. I can't imagine explaining to my son why he's getting remeasured or worse turned away when he's ridden things with the same height requirement. It's unnecessary stress on a child and defeats the purpose of the wristband.

 

Sorry didn't mean for it to turn into such a rant.

 

Great Adventure is weird. They also make you show ID and get an "Over 21" wristband when you buy alcohol and then proceed to ask for ID when you go back to get another beer. If you get carded every time you buy a beer anyway (fine by me) then why does the wristband exist?

 

It's Six Flags. I'm convinced that every group of employees in each ride / store / customer service location / department operates in a vacuum and never discusses anything with anyone in any other department or location ever for any reason.

 

I don't blame the ride ops. I guarantee that there's no clear communication on anything. Full disclosure: I don't work there and I've never worked there but I'm pretty confident in that assumption.

 

From someone that worked there for 6 years in two different departments, you're not that far off. Basically, communication between departments (ie, rides vs. games vs. merch) would only be covered during the big "what's new" orientation at the start of a season and then never again during the season. Within a department, I have to say that mine were pretty good but they were kinda small comparitively (parking and security), but I've heard stores of various stores within merch not talking to each other and various supervisors not sharing the same information with all locations.

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Think I saw Coasterbill and Boldikus at one point but in the interest of it possibly not being them I didnt want to be that guy who walks up to someone and it's not even them.

 

We were there. There were also 2 other people in the park who looked remarkably like us who we later found out might be serial killers. You had a 50/50 shot.

 

I'm glad I made it home alive then

 

I'd enjoy sharing a beer if I run into you guys again. Feel like it would be an entertaining few minutes at the very least.

 

I realized on the drive home that I got more days at GADV this year than at SFNE. Hard to explain to most people why I voluntarily drove down to New Jersey 3 times in 6 months. And those trips will only increase when Devil gets up and running.

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I realized on the drive home that I got more days at GADV this year than at SFNE. Hard to explain to most people why I voluntarily drove down to New Jersey 3 times in 6 months. And those trips will only increase when Devil gets up and running.

 

I realized on the drive home that I got more days at GADV, Kings Dominion, Disneyland Paris, Busch Gardens Williamsburg, Hollywood Studios, Animal Kingdom, Magic Kingdom and Universal Orlando and probably others this year than at SFNE and that park is much closer than all of those.

 

I'd enjoy sharing a beer if I run into you guys again. Feel like it would be an entertaining few minutes at the very least.

 

Sounds good!

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^ I think that was TPR's experience at Six Flags Great America a few years back.

 

Yup, and I still have such a bad taste in my mouth from that SFGAm visit that I just can't even go back! We followed all of the rules and you made my young child get booed by strangers?!!? Screw that park and those employees.

 

On that same trip SFGAd gave KT a wristband and a name tag to make up for that other park experience and she had a great time riding everything!

 

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I really like Green Lantern.

I don't like B&M stand-ups at all (or B&M flyers, for that matter) but I didn't find this one to be nearly as bad as some folks seem to find it. It was a once-and-done ride for me when I visited the park, but I've had rides on Riddler that have been super head-bangy and awkward as well. I didn't think Green Lantern was any better or worse; more of a flawed concept than anything.

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^ I think that was TPR's experience at Six Flags Great America a few years back.

 

Yup, and I still have such a bad taste in my mouth from that SFGAm visit that I just can't even go back! We followed all of the rules and you made my young child get booed by strangers?!!? Screw that park and those employees.

 

On that same trip SFGAd gave KT a wristband and a name tag to make up for that other park experience and she had a great time riding everything!

 

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With the Nitro situation yesterday, the kid was clearly too short when they came around to measure with the stick. But he kept standing against the sign (with the green and red sections) and was good on that. The ride op kept telling the guy to go to the front of the park and get a wristband. Sucks for the guy that there's two different variations of 54" but at the same time I understand the stance of the op.

 

On the other hand, if you have the wristband and they still won't let you ride, then that's just poor communication and a bad measuring job when they make the sticks. In that case the wristband should be enough unless it's really egregious.

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[youtu_be]

[/youtu_be]

 

Is this the same park that basically ignored social media just a few years ago? Love this video. Nerdy enough for the enthusiasts but also breaks it down in layman's terms for the average park guest/fan. Can't wait for that steel to show up.

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Jesus Christ, well, that explains why the Nitro team was being super anal about height checks yesterday. My kiddo already had been measured at the beginning of the day and had a green 54" wristband on, and the person at the gate made him take off his winter hat and hoods to measure up again... then after they gave him the thumbs up and we were about to board, someone ELSE walked up and said they needed to do the same thing. I get the safety requirements but at that point it was a little overkill.

 

I try to always give the benefit of the doubt when people moan about ride-ops and just say they're doing their jobs but I hate this. IF you've taken the time to get your child checked at guest services or wherever and had a wristband attached confirming the height that should then be the end of it. I feel like either here or twitter or facebook there was a TR a while back where some-one got measured at another Six Flags and the ride-op denied them and people were booing at the hold-up. I can't remember all the facts but I remember feeling horrified. I can't imagine explaining to my son why he's getting remeasured or worse turned away when he's ridden things with the same height requirement. It's unnecessary stress on a child and defeats the purpose of the wristband.

 

Sorry didn't mean for it to turn into such a rant.

 

Great Adventure is weird. They also make you show ID and get an "Over 21" wristband when you buy alcohol and then proceed to ask for ID when you go back to get another beer. If you get carded every time you buy a beer anyway (fine by me) then why does the wristband exist?

 

It's Six Flags. I'm convinced that every group of employees in each ride / store / customer service location / department operates in a vacuum and never discusses anything with anyone in any other department or location ever for any reason.

 

I don't blame the ride ops. I guarantee that there's no clear communication on anything. Full disclosure: I don't work there and I've never worked there but I'm pretty confident in that assumption.

 

Maybe I was too quick to blame it on the ops then. Sorry for that but I do think that it's really silly that guest services offer an official wristband to confirm the height that doesn't actually confirm it. That and even after one op confirms it, having another come over again seems like over-kill. I know my son would stress and it would be on his mind the whole ride instead of having fun and if for whatever reason he got turned away after riding others that would definitely be his day over because he just wouldn't understand why.

 

^ I think that was TPR's experience at Six Flags Great America a few years back.

 

Yup, and I still have such a bad taste in my mouth from that SFGAm visit that I just can't even go back! We followed all of the rules and you made my young child get booed by strangers?!!? Screw that park and those employees.

 

On that same trip SFGAd gave KT a wristband and a name tag to make up for that other park experience and she had a great time riding everything!

 

<>

 

She's braver than Noah, if that had happened to him we probably wouldn't have even been able to talk him into another theme park a few days later.

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Regarding height checks

 

SeaWorld Experience many years ago:

 

We measured all of our posts every morning at each ride, it was part of our checklist. We would even get a measuring tape from a supervisor if the parents got on our case, to verify the height of the posts. We also had wristbands at greeter so they wouldn't have to be rechecked on the platform if they were close.

 

Problem is, we've also seen adults switch wristbands on their kids before (one that is clearly over X inches switches with someone under who didn't originally have a wristband, so they both can ride), and hence why sometimes we take the extra 20 seconds to recheck a child even if they have a wristband, especially if it looks suspicious and poorly put on. I can count at least 4 or 5 times (granted that's over several years, it didn't happen THAT often) where I've had to REMOVE a band off a kid because they had terrible parents abusing the bands, using tape, etc. Then they cause a scene when they are 4" under, security has to get called, etc. it does happen.

 

If it's very close and they are ever so slightly under and have a wristband that's one thing, and they can ride, but if they visually looked under, we always double checked and reminded the parent it was for their safety and apologise for the inconvenience.

 

I'm pretty sure the SOP's mentioned this as well, that it's always ok to recheck even if they have a wristband, because of those who will really do anything to get their kids on a ride. It's not any different from stuffing your shoes in the parental sense... people will always do anything to skirt around the rules. We didn't recheck often, but sometimes we HAD to. Obviously some judgement calls to recheck are better than others.

 

It's one of those things as an op... you don't want to lose your job or god forbid have someone get hurt that ends up being your fault because a kid was clearly too short to ride.

 

Does it suck as a parent? Yes. Is it an inconvenience? Yes. But we can't always have nice things because of the bad people who want to skirt the rules.

 

Why have a wristband system at all, one could argue, but we wouldn't check everyone again just for the fun of it. Wristbands were more for the "how come they were able to ride this, but not this" when it's too close to call.

 

Just explaining the other side of the story. It can be a sticky situation.

 

What happens when someone shows you an on-ride photo of their kids riding earlier in the day, or a few days before, or whatever? As a supervisor, you don't know who let them ride, but now you are the one saying your staff was in the wrong and put your child in danger earlier in the day if you are saying you can't let them ride now for safety reasons.

 

And that's why I'm no longer in ops

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My experience as a former SF and CF ride op. Ride ops were trained to always have the final say on what height was safe to ride or not. Like mentioned above it is very very common for parents to switch wrist bands, stuff shoes, wear shoes with exaggerated soles/heels and then change after measurement. So while a wrist band is nice, it was not a 100% indication a child is good to go. In 5 years I spent at GL/SFWoA I saw many parents do a lot of shady things to get a wrist band on a kid that was too short to ride.

 

And ultimately the ride op is responsible for the riders safety at the ride. At least in Ohio, ride operators can be held criminally and civilly liable for injury that happens on a ride if they allow someone who does not meet the manufacturers requirements to ride. Better safe than sorry.

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Stupid question, but if they have a wristband system and ride ops are specifically trained not to trust the wristband system then why have a wristband system? I get where you're coming from but shouldn't they just not have the system? As a guest if they told me to go walk over to a place that gave out wristbands and I went there and stood in line and got one and then they ignored it anyway I'd be pretty annoyed.

Edited by coasterbill
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But anybody that got the band legitimately should be good just by eyeing them. After working a ride for a day or two you learn pretty quick how to eye someone's height for your ride just by looking at them or comparing then to a railing or whatever. If they have a wristband and you need to question it, then chances are they obtained it "illegally"

 

But of course some employees will see a 1mm difference and not allow it, so... more of a guide than an end all be all.

 

I get what you're saying, but there would be a whole lot more stoppages on the platform waiting to send a train out without the wristbands on rides that don't measure behind the airgates.

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^ That's what you'd think, but specifically at Great Adventure and at Nitro, that's not necessarily the case. The first time we visited last year, my son had just hit the 54" mark and we had done almost every other 54" ride in the park, including Kingda Ka, Batman, Superman, Green Lantern, and Bizarro. Measured up at the beginning of the queue. No problem. At the gate, guy comes around with the stick and is like "he's too short". He measures up right at the gate there along one of those height measurement sticks they have posted and he makes it just fine there, but the guy still goes "no, that height guide doesn't matter, he's not touching my stick, so he's too short". The stick was about a half an inch higher than their posted height. They told him to go get measured up at the ride information center on Main Street and get a wristband. Thankfully on the other side of the station, they had another stick at that entrance which he did measure up on and got the thumbs-up. We did end up making a complaint about the height discrepancy on that one stick to guest services that day, but from the sounds of it, it doesn't sound like anything has changed.

 

So that's one thing. The other thing is what I mentioned in my previous post, where even once you get the kid the wristband, they still ask to measure him, even going so far to say "the wristband doesn't mean anything, I need to physically measure him". Okay, no problem, you have a job to do and you gotta do it, I get that. At this most recent visit for us, it had been like five months since the last time we rode Nitro, and he had grown even more, so I felt confident he's not going to get bounced. And sure enough he measured up without any problems. So then why does a second person come by to re-measure him after the first person gives him the thumbs-up? At that point, it just gets ridiculous. And I'm not surprised to hear that there were other parents having the same problems. And it's always only for Nitro.

 

I'm just glad that by the time the parks open up again this season, he's tall enough that he hopefully won't have to deal with this crap again going forward. (But now I get to go through it all over again with my shortie-pie of a daughter, who's turning 5 soon and is currently hitting 44" rides.)

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As Wolfbobs mentioned (worked at a Cedar Fair park as well), the wristband was only utilized as "deal-breaker", if you will.

 

If there was a child who was right on the edge, we would advise them to get an official height check.

 

This way, if checking height and the child was right on the edge but had a wristband, 99.9% of the time the operator would let them proceed with no issue. But we ALWAYS had discretion to deny if we suspected that there was some deceiving going on (swapping bands and such). But that is pretty obvious when/if that did occur.

 

Sometimes the parents would get irritated if we did re-check their kid with a wristband, but usually not a big deal. That wristband is very helpful for those situations when the kid is right on the line.

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Stupid question, but if they have a wristband system and ride ops are specifically trained not to trust the wristband system then why have a wristband system? I get where you're coming from but shouldn't they just not have the system? As a guest if they told me to go walk over to a place that gave out wristbands and I went there and stood in line and got one and then they ignored it anyway I'd be pretty annoyed.

 

Trust me, as a guest who follows the rules too I would be annoyed. And honestly in my 5 years of operating rides the shady parent who swapped bands, stuffed shoes, changed shoes, etc may have only happened a few times a season but it did happen. The normal problem I had was a child wearing flip-flops with a 2"+ heal or sole that would make a kid barely 48". Then they would want to remove the flip flops to ride so they wouldn't fly off. Now the kid is two inches too short and under the requirement. It was always such an aggravating battle.

 

In the end, ride ops aren't trying to be d**cks, they're just trying to do their best while some douchie parents are trying to cheat a system to get their kid to ride something.

 

But most parents would be cool. I even got to height check the kids of my childhood hero, Bernie Kosar! He was awesome about it when I had to deny one of his kids a ride at Raging Wolf Bobs. Even chatted with me at the control booth and signed an autograph for me before he left.

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I don't have to be there to know what really happened because I've seen it dozens of times from people too cheap to shell out $1

 

Patron: "What do you mean I can't take my phone on the ride.

Employee: Sorry you need to put it in locker or have a non-rider hold it.

Patron: I've taken my phone on a lot of rides.

Employee: For safety reasons you can not take it on KingdaKa.

Patron: I'm not paying a f'n dollar, I already give his park too much money.

Employee: You can leave it with someone who is not riding.

Patron: Well that's not good enough

Employer: Then hide it somewhere

 

Even if the employee said the last statement, the patron has no basis to claim it is the sole responsibility of hate park. I'm sure it will get settled out of court but hope SFGAdv doesn't have to remove the "dangerous" bamboo that effectively themed the Golden Kingdom

 

I guess Steven Keim Jr. is lucky he didn't win a Darwin Award with a deadly infection from the bamboo. But to think walking off a path to bury or hide something to avoid paying a dollar is foolish and karma's a bitch.

 

 

Another example of someone who doesn't know the meaning of personal responibility

 

Roller-coaster rider sues Great Adventure over bamboo accident

Jim Walsh, Cherry Hill Courier-Post Published 5:00 a.m. ET Jan. 16, 2020

 

CAMDEN - A lawsuit filed against Six Flags Great Adventure contends the amusement park is responsible for a gruesome injury suffered by a patron after a roller-coaster ride.

 

In the suit, a Pennsylvania man says he was at the entrance to the Kingda Ka ride when he was told he could not bring his cellphone on what's described as the world's tallest roller coaster.

 

The patron, Steven Keim Jr., claims an employee of the Jackson park advised him to hide the phone under foliage in a bamboo grove behind a nearby smoking area.

 

Keim quickly concealed the phone and completed his ride on Kingda Ka, the lawsuit says.

 

But when he returned to the thicket to retrieve the phone, the lawsuit says, Keim stepped on "an extremely sharp piece of cut bamboo."

 

The bamboo shard, allegedly covered by foliage, "pierced through his shoe, penetrated his foot and caused … serious, permanent personal injuries," says the suit.

 

A Great Adventure spokesperson said Thursday the park does not comment on pending litigation, but added "the safety of our guests and team members is our top priority."

 

Great Adventure's website notes "no loose articles including cell phones will be permitted on Kingda Ka."

 

"Please store them in a locker or with a non-rider before entering the queue." it says.

 

The suit says the cut bamboo caused "a penetrating wound to the plantar area of (Keim's) right foot requiring sutures."

 

It asserts the accident resulted in "severe pain" and the need for surgeries, among other consequences.

 

The suit, initially filed in state court in Ocean County, was moved this week to Camden federal court.

 

It seeks unspecified damages and legal costs for Keim, a resident of Douglassville, Berks County, in connection with the May 2018 incident.

 

The suit, which says Keim encountered "a highly dangerous and defective condition," includes photographs of the bamboo grove behind a bench and a cigarette receptacle.

 

The lawsuit contends Great Adventure is responsible for maintaining the safety of its premises, "including the designated smoking area adjacent to the ride 'Kingda Ka,' and the grounds, trees and foliage immediately surrounding the area."

 

It argues Keim's injury "was caused solely and substantially by the negligence and carelessness" of Great Adventure.

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