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Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread


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It's actually HILARIOUS that everyone continues to say I'm "A$$ talking." When V2 is removed, then maybe you will learn to take people seriously and not make a joke of everything. If you choose not to believe me, then I guess you choose not to believe that I was the original person to post
.

 

No sweat though, Rip me to invisible bits on the internet, I'm sure that'll make you feel better about yourselves.

 

History is against you. There's always a "in the know" person that suddenly pops up claiming NDA, insider info, blah, blah, blah, and nothing ever comes of it. I've dealt with enough people at SFGAm through Media Days, to know you're presenting a pretty unlikely picture. And presenting $1 a launch, made you lose all credibility in my book. That's just absurd, even for a shoot from the hip number. I don't think I can run a lightbulb for that anymore.

 

Wait, what? He says he has no idea but then offers up a "$1 per launch" guess and you appreciate that? Wish my curiosity was as easily satiated

 

He gave the best number he could at the time. Do you have anything better?

 

An actual educated guess would help.

Edited by mcjaco
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http://home.roadrunner.com/~gep2/mrfreeze.html?vm=r

I found this article on Mr. Freeze. Assuming it is accurate, It uses 5000 amps at 480 volts, which converts to 2.4 million watts for each launch and produces 5000hp. Since V2 does not have the spike LIMS, I would estimate that something around 2 million watts per cycle is realistic. I'm no expert on power comsumption, but that seems like it costs more than most of us think, and could certainly be a good reason for the park wanting to move it.

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SFGAM is one of the top grossing parks in the chain... I don't understand your logic in thinking that they are in need to get ride of V2. Its still popular and there aren't any budget concerns. I'd be more concerned about parks with launch coasters that don't make alot of money... I.e. SFSTL or SFA but they aren't moving their launch coasters either so I think its safe to Dismiss all of this speculation. I could see Rajun Cajun or Dark Knight Coaster leaving before V2 does.

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Maths time!

 

2 million watts is equal to 2000 kilowatts. The first day of opening this season, Six Flags Great America is open from 10am to 7pm, a total of 9 hours. Assuming that a complete V2 cycle (load, run, unload) lasts about five minutes, you would theoretically get 108 cycles a day. The ride runs for about a minute, so the LIMs would be working for about 108 minutes during the day, or 1.8 hours.

 

So, V2 would use 3600kWh of power, which, if power is about 7 cents per kilowatt-hour in Gurnee (did a quick search on a website), would cost them $252 to run daily strictly in launch power, or about $2.33 per cycle. That seems like a lot for a normal household, but Six Flags Great America isn't a normal household.

 

Now, granted, these numbers are only true IF V2 uses 2000kW per launch AND ALSO IF Six Flags Great America pays 7 cents per kilowatt-hour.

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Could you guys look at the link and just make sure my estimate makes sense? I don't know if that number is just for the original launch and then if there is more for the spike on Mr. Freeze. There could be a little higher number needed if more is being used on the successive pass throughs on V2 too. V2 also took more when the holding brake worked too. I think V2 is capable of around 20 cycles per hour. But we are close to figuring this out as a group and that's why I brought it up. I have tried to figure this out alone before and I couldn't.

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V2 has recieved two new trains, and heavy overhauls in the past.

 

I'm curious about what it is on V2 that would cause it to go through trains more than any other coaster (and why the trains would be more expensive). In fact isn't it pretty rare that a coaster has an entire train replaced? Since V2 has no turns, and not-terribly-extreme forces, I'm surprised to hear that the train falls apart so rapidly that is has needed to be completely replaced twice in just 10 years (rather than yearly maintenance).

 

Cameron.

The trains don't "fall apart," they get typical stress fractures. Since the track is so far away from the heartline on an impulse, the twist puts a lot more stress on the train than you'd think. And it is not rare for an impulse: Wicked Twister's train chassis have been 100% completely replaced; all 8 of them. They're all different too because 2 of them are replaced each year. As far as I know, Intamin discovered that the trains with the two giant bolts supporting the seats were not stable enough and made the chassis one solid piece instead.

 

^With the statistics listed in that link: 2400kW per launch. I am assuming by POVs etc it is safe to say Mr Freeze dispatches every 130 seconds (using both loading sides), which is appx 28 dispatches/hour. The launch itself is around 8 seconds, so 8 * 28 = 224 seconds or .062 hours. 2400kW * .062 = 148kWh. 8 cents per kilowatt hour in Arlington translates to $11.84/hour. Or $106.56/9-hour-day.

 

That's all the math I can come up with. You have to consider that this is all pretty much approximate, and that the ride probably uses a crap ton more power on controls, lighting, air conditioning, etc throughout the day.

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V2 has recieved two new trains, and heavy overhauls in the past.

 

I'm curious about what it is on V2 that would cause it to go through trains more than any other coaster (and why the trains would be more expensive). In fact isn't it pretty rare that a coaster has an entire train replaced? Since V2 has no turns, and not-terribly-extreme forces, I'm surprised to hear that the train falls apart so rapidly that is has needed to be completely replaced twice in just 10 years (rather than yearly maintenance).

 

Cameron.

The trains don't "fall apart," they get typical stress fractures. Since the track is so far away from the heartline on an impulse, the twist puts a lot more stress on the train than you'd think. And it is not rare for an impulse: Wicked Twister's train chassis have been 100% completely replaced; all 8 of them. They're all different too because 2 of them are replaced each year. As far as I know, Intamin discovered that the trains with the two giant bolts supporting the seats were not stable enough and made the chassis one solid piece instead.

 

I'm curious if Intamin ever stops to check these things... It seems like every single coaster they introduce has to have at least one major problem within the first year of operations..

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I'm curious if Intamin ever stops to check these things... It seems like every single coaster they introduce has to have at least one major problem within the first year of operations..

 

"Every single coaster they introduce," or at least the majority, is some form of a prototype or new design that has been previously untested, or tested very little. There isn't much data and/or previous models to go on when most Intamin coasters are first built, so these kind of things are going to occur when wondering into uncharted territory as often as they do. Having the 'trial and error' approach is really the best they can do. Everything can look great on paper, but they'll never know until they actually try it, and not everything is going to be a success.

 

This isn't just V2 either, WT at Cedar Point is the same way (as is every other Impulse, I'm sure)...it eats through wheels, has had new seats, chassis', belts, etc.

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^Yes, unlike B&M, Intamin makes many coasters that are not much alike, and those tend to be the ones that have problems. Impulse coasters, unfortunately, eat through wheels because only one train is used for every circuit, every 2 minutes. Even on large fast coasters, the wheels aren't used as much as an impulse. This also goes for the chassis and why they have problems.

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Maths time!

 

2 million watts is equal to 2000 kilowatts. The first day of opening this season, Six Flags Great America is open from 10am to 7pm, a total of 9 hours. Assuming that a complete V2 cycle (load, run, unload) lasts about five minutes, you would theoretically get 108 cycles a day. The ride runs for about a minute, so the LIMs would be working for about 108 minutes during the day, or 1.8 hours.

 

So, V2 would use 3600kWh of power, which, if power is about 7 cents per kilowatt-hour in Gurnee (did a quick search on a website), would cost them $252 to run daily strictly in launch power, or about $2.33 per cycle. That seems like a lot for a normal household, but Six Flags Great America isn't a normal household.

 

Now, granted, these numbers are only true IF V2 uses 2000kW per launch AND ALSO IF Six Flags Great America pays 7 cents per kilowatt-hour.

 

 

Damn, I pay 22 cents a kw hour in New York. It is really that much cheaper in other parts of the country.

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They confirmed they are still part of the plans at the recent construction tour. While the additional theming may not be built, the near misses are being used as selling points of the ride so they will be there. The water fly over was also filled today, so that will be there as well. Not sure if it will have the fountains in or not though.

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