Jump to content
  TPR Home | Parks | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Instagram 

Disneyland Resort (DL, DLR, DCA) Discussion Thread

P. 391: Mickey's Toontown reimagining announced for 2023!

Recommended Posts

I also think the only way FP+ would really thrive at the DLR is if it gave a benefit to guests visiting the park over annual passholders. Something like allowing overnight resort guests to book in advance, but keep the passholders from booking until the day of their visit. Anything to keep those pesky passholders in check (recently made the decision to not renew because I just don't like the people at the park right now).

 

I agree. AP holders would take up all the reservations WAY in advance if they could. I suspect that when the system comes to DLR, it will be heavily favored to hotel guests and 1-day ticket holders. Which of course will lead to insane amounts of bitching from AP holders...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also think the only way FP+ would really thrive at the DLR is if it gave a benefit to guests visiting the park over annual passholders. Something like allowing overnight resort guests to book in advance, but keep the passholders from booking until the day of their visit. Anything to keep those pesky passholders in check (recently made the decision to not renew because I just don't like the people at the park right now).

 

I agree. AP holders would take up all the reservations WAY in advance if they could. I suspect that when the system comes to DLR, it will be heavily favored to hotel guests and 1-day ticket holders. Which of course will lead to insane amounts of bitching from AP holders...

 

Isn't this the way WDW already works? Resort Guests get special benefits over people (AP or otherwise) not staying on property. Really, the system works perfectly fine and would suit Disneyland great!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also think the only way FP+ would really thrive at the DLR is if it gave a benefit to guests visiting the park over annual passholders. Something like allowing overnight resort guests to book in advance, but keep the passholders from booking until the day of their visit. Anything to keep those pesky passholders in check (recently made the decision to not renew because I just don't like the people at the park right now).

 

I agree. AP holders would take up all the reservations WAY in advance if they could. I suspect that when the system comes to DLR, it will be heavily favored to hotel guests and 1-day ticket holders. Which of course will lead to insane amounts of bitching from AP holders...

 

Isn't this the way WDW already works? Resort Guests get special benefits over people (AP or otherwise) not staying on property. Really, the system works perfectly fine and would suit Disneyland great!

 

DLR has a network of "Good Neighbor" hotels literally around the resort, so even people not directly on the property still get some sort of benefit. But still, FP+ would be perfect for not just international and out-of-state guests, but locals too. I can only go to Disneyland so many times in a year (was gonna get an AP, but decided against it), so having the ability to actually ride the rides I want without having to sprint to get a piece of paper (that I've managed to lose many times before) would be a god-send.

 

Now... it's just a matter of actually fitting it into the park.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. AP holders would take up all the reservations WAY in advance if they could. I suspect that when the system comes to DLR, it will be heavily favored to hotel guests and 1-day ticket holders. Which of course will lead to insane amounts of bitching from AP holders...

 

Yes, that's going to be a problem but is it really that bad given the limitations WDW has already placed? WDW's limit of 3 advance reservations seems to be mitigating this amongst all the millions of hotel guests that it sees. Unless you're looking to meet Anna & Elsa, those limitations are doing fine right? Whether they're hotel guests or AP holders, it's still millions of people descending upon the place. In terms of sheer ravenous guest demand, is there that much difference? Sure they're probably going to need the tiering that Epcot and Hollywood Studios does but apart from that it should do pretty well with enough tweaking and test periods to ensure that everything is working properly.

 

Whatever solutions are eventually developed, it's still going to be a better situation than having to get to DCA at the crack of dawn and wait in a huge queue to get the chance to carry a paper FP for Radiator Springs Racers, and possibly lose it, for multiple hours. It'll be better than having to send a family member out to the other park next door to grab more paper tickets. It'll be better than having to wait in those main entrance turnstile queues while people dig around in their pockets for their admission ticket and have to get their picture taken because terrible people fraudulently sell and transfer ticket media. I just can't wait until these all these unnecessary delays are gone forever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^I think it's an apples to oranges comparison. WDW certainly has more total visitors, but it also has more total attractions to spread those visitors around to. I still think they will have to do more than just allowing hotel visitors 60 days vs everyone else getting 30 by the time it comes to DLR to combat the AP crowd, but I 100% agree it will be a HUGE improvement over the current system.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't understand why it would be so difficult to give hotel guests a passcode when they check in (or receive a text message with a new daily code for the length of their stay) that would allow them the privilege of early access to reserve a fast pass for an attraction before the typical guest. Then non hotel guests would only be allowed access once the park opens and once per hour.

 

Then again, I don't exactly understand how fp+ works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't used Fastpass+, but from what I've heard about it I'd like to see it eventually come to the Disneyland Resort. I do hope Disney will get all the bugs worked out before expanding it to any other parks, but I wouldn't be surprised if paper Fastpass is gone from every one of their parks in 10 years. I wouldn't worry much about there being a problem with AP guests, as implementing a change like any of the following would probably solve the problem of them claiming all the reservations:

 

1. Only those staying at the Disneyland Resort hotels are eligible for advance booking, and everyone else must book through their smartphone or kiosks at the park on the day of their visit. Guests staying at other nearby hotels could also potentially qualify for advance reservations with proof of stay, though Disney hotel guests should get priority (perhaps 60 day advance for Disney hotel guests and 30 days for others). This approach would give a huge incentive to stay on site if visiting from out of town.

 

2. Like in Florida, everyone may book at 30 days in advance (60 for hotel guests), but AP guests may only book for one date at a time and cannot book additional FP+ reservations for other dates until all existing reservations are used or cancelled. This would allow everyone to have the perk of early reservations without allowing AP guests to dominate reservations.

 

3. AP guests get a limited number of reservations per year (probably around 100), and can only have a limited number active at one time (probably around 10). You would not receive credit if you make a reservation and don't end up using it. This is the most restrictive and would probably not be popular with AP guests, but the reality is few would probably end up using all their reservations, and if you visit enough to use them all how much do you really need it?

 

Point is, there are plenty of ways to make Fastpass+ work at the Disneyland Resort and have it be fair to everyone without allowing it to be exploited by any one group. In fact, using the system exactly the way it works in Florida would likely fail at Disneyland due to the majority of visitors being different (AP holders in California, tourists in Florida), so I'm sure some tweaks will be made to the system. Of course, anything Disney does that limits a specific group of visitors will probably receive kickback, but if you really dislike it then don't use it or don't visit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't understand why it would be so difficult to give hotel guests a passcode when they check in (or receive a text message with a new daily code for the length of their stay) that would allow them the privilege of early access to reserve a fast pass for an attraction before the typical guest. Then non hotel guests would only be allowed access once the park opens and once per hour.

 

Then again, I don't exactly understand how fp+ works.

 

There's no need for a code, simply booking your room allows you special privileges already and advanced reservation capabilities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to add something, there is supposedly a policy for WDW AP's for FP+. The system is only supposed to allow 7 Days of FP+ in a 30-Day period. I haven't actually tested this yet, but that's a policy from Disney.

 

Also, I should add that as a FL-Resident AP, I can book WDW FP+ 60 days out. I believe it's longer for Resort Guests, but not entirely sure.

 

Regardless, people will bitch no matter what the situation. Sure it does take some spontaneity out of a trip, but it seems that the majority of guests actually enjoy this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking from a bit of experience just the other day, I think FP+ beats the hell out of running from attraction to attraction to get paper passes. "Spontaneity" isn't entirely removed from the equation, either; in fact, it seems to be me that having a few passes booked ahead of time might encourage people to explore parks a bit more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking from a bit of experience just the other day, I think FP+ beats the hell out of running from attraction to attraction to get paper passes. "Spontaneity" isn't entirely removed from the equation, either; in fact, it seems to be me that having a few passes booked ahead of time might encourage people to explore parks a bit more.

 

^This!

 

Having come back from Florida using FP+ it was great not having to run all over the park to get a FP. It would be a great addition IMO to Disneyland.

 

It is going to be a bummer next week when I pass by the park on my way to San Diego but don't have enough time to stop.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2014/10/glow-with-the-show-evolves-into-made-with-magic-this-fall-at-disney-parks/

 

I have exciting news to share about the next evolution of Glow With the Show. Introduced in 2012 at Disneyland Resort, this ear hat technology allowed guests to become a part of a show by lighting up in time with or in the same color scheme as a nighttime show or fireworks display. Last year, it was added to nighttime spectaculars at Walt Disney World Resort such as Fantasmic! at Disney’s Hollywood Studios and Wishes nighttime spectacular at Magic Kingdom Park. This fall, we are adding some new merchandise items that contain this interactive technology under a new name called “Made With Magic.”

 

Made With Magic items will excite, delight, light up and interact with select Disney experiences at Disney Parks. We will continue to offer the original ear hat first introduced a few years ago. New items will include a new Minnie Mouse-inspired headband, a Mickey Mouse glove and, my favorite, a magical wand that reminds me of Sorcerer Mickey.

 

The Sorcerer Mickey wand will have multiple light-up functions and will give guests the ability to change the light patterns of other Made With Magic items. Guests can also place the Made With Magic items in a color-changing demo mode, when they aren’t present at “Made With Magic”-enabled entertainment.

 

As with the previously released ear hat, all Made With Magic items will interact with experiences at Disney Parks around the world regardless of where the items were originally purchased.

 

Each item will have a retail of $25.00.

 

Guests should look for the Minnie Mouse headband to arrive in late October and early November in select merchandise locations at Disneyland Resort and Walt Disney World Resort. The Mickey Mouse glove and the Sorcerer Mickey wand will be introduced in late November to early December at those same locations.

MWM585941.jpg.d7b25290521c3245e5672ab210988538.jpg

MWM585943.thumb.jpg.8af1d4cfaf576c8449282ad556f2881c.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^I hope they do more smaller things that guests can do on their on in the park (similar to the Potter wands). This is cool technology, but it looks silly when only a small portion of a shows audience has them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Each item will have a retail of $25.00.

 

And this is why only a small part of a show's audience will have them.

 

At least it's not quite as dumb as buying the $25 ear hat where everyone but you will be able to see your hat interact with the show. You could at least see a wand or glove in your hand, but $25 is much too high for a plastic wand or glove with a blinky light.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's great to see all this technology going into the parks. I'm really hoping for FP+. The whole time I was there for Labor Day running all over the park for fast passes, I was thinking how much better it would have been with FP+.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use https://themeparkreview.com/forum/topic/116-terms-of-service-please-read/