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Sexual Orientation


GAcoaster
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What's your orientation?  

2,132 members have voted

  1. 1. What's your orientation?

    • I'm a guy who likes girls
      1224
    • I'm a guy who likes guys
      471
    • I'm a girl who likes guys
      114
    • I'm a girl who likes girls
      17
    • I'm a guy who likes guys and girls
      163
    • I'm a girl who likes girls
      35
    • I haven't figured out what I like yet...
      64
    • Hobosexual (I'm a person who likes hobos)
      22
    • Hoosexual (I'm a person who likes owls)
      46


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I mean, as a parent, I would be concerned if my child was headed off to make gay stripper porn.

 

It's funny you bring that up. My mom and I were talking about that. I ask her how would she feel if I went into porn. She said she would laugh every time she saw me - but not at me, it would be because she thinks porn is silly. She said I don't care what you do - its your body go do what you want with it. And then she surprised me and said "go make that money".

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^ That made my day!

 

I am straight and currently in the process of finding a girlfriend. I think I have a chance with this one girl in a one of my classes but first I need to make sure she is single. I don't handle awkeard moments very well.

 

 

haha. Yeah - that's a good gatekeeping question to ask. Good luck with it, though!

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  • 1 month later...

I never really had to come out to my parents - I had a very fun loving mom who was very close with several of my friends and I am unsure if she had asked them or they just told her but before I could say anything to my Mom and Dad they both already knew and my Mom was actually excited about it. Dad not so much at first I think he had to get used to it, he did have many gay friends when he was in college (in fact my Mom thought he was gay when she met him because he did have quite a few gay friends so it wasn't because he had an issue with gay people) It just took him a while for whatever reason , then my Grandma shocked me as I had no clue she knew I was gay until one day she randomly asked if I had a boyfriend and if I did to bring him the next time I came to visit - It was all bit unnerving and awesome at the same time to have it all happen that way

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I am straight. I hope I do not offend anyone with my views. For this reason, I shall keep them to myself.

 

-Aaron "The Strong Christian, Like Tebow" H

 

^

Thank you.

 

Scott - your grandmother sounds AWESOME!

 

Oh yeah she is awesome - 91 Years old and still one of the most accepting people I know

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Im kinda straight, although if Marco Dapper pulled down his pants in front of me I wouldnt say no

 

I just Googled him. Pants should never be an option for him.

 

If I'm not mistaken, there is a LOVELY scene of him without pants on in "Eating Out Two: Sloppy Seconds"

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^Oh the Eating Out series. They're so poorly acted, but so fun to watch. And they ALWAYS have some sort of eye candy to keep me coming back. Scott Lunsford, Ryan Carnes, Marco Dapper, Chris Salvatore, Aaron Milo, Michael E.R. Walker. They're all fantastic

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^^Logo even edits the full length movies they put online. It's disappointing at times when watching movies that may be hard to find elsewhere and they are edited for TV, but at least they have a decent selection.

 

^If you've seen one Eating Out movie, you've basically seen them all. But that doesn't make them any less fun to watch. Have you seen the first one or any of the later ones?

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LOGO, in my humble opinion, has gone from 'meh' to just plain awful in less than two years. Diversity on it? Nope. Stereotypes? Yup- and lots of them.

 

They cancelled two -brilliant- programs: "Rick and Steve' as well as the gay sketch comedy show: Both of which showed a lot of promise, and something OTHER than stereotype re-enforcement.

 

What did they put in instead? Crap, crap and more crap.

 

They have, in one way or another, made a -complete- mockery of gay people: The "A" list, which I've seen -one- episode of, is enough to make me think that these children (And I doubt it any of them are over 24, as after all, gay people magically disappear at age 25) are shallow, petty sluts who have -no- real personality at all: I've seen better personalities out of slugs or worms.

 

They cancelled two -brilliant- programs: "Rick and Steve' as well as the gay sketch comedy show: Both of which showed a lot of promise, and something OTHER than stereotype re-enforcement.

 

Then there's RuPaul's Drag Race: Once again, bitchy men fighting it out over wigs and dresses. REALLY?

 

And now, they're showing programs like "Teen Mom" on there. Now let's think about this: A network dedicated to GAY MEN and LESBIANS showing a program that COULD NEVER EVEN POSSIBLY HAPPEN TO GAY PEOPLE WITHOUT JERRY SPRINGERS HELP?!?!?!

 

And then, there's the total neglect of Lesbians on the network.

 

I'd like to meet the head of programming with my Womyns Softball team, and show him that he's missing out on some critical demographics there. It's like for some reason they can't show anything other than bitchy queens and drama, and are forgetting that there's a whole other element to the gay community that's going completely unrepresented out there: Everyone OTHER than bitchy queens and kids. Many of us are over 25. Many of us are not 18 pounds wet. Some of us have -GASP- body hair. Some of us are not bound to the gym by law. A few of us even like to play SPORTS!

 

The gay community is made up of diversity- by nature and by how it has dealt with life. LOGO intends on getting rid of that: If you're over 25, or have -one- shred of body hair, or are a womyn, forget it. You don't belong there.

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That's definitely an interesting point. I've never been interested much in anything other than the movies they have online but it's definitely obvious that the "bitchy queen" stereotype is being enforced ad nauseam. I've just chosen to ignore it since i never much liked the stereotypes associated with the characters/people shown in their shows due to the fact that I don't really relate to them, but it is unfortunate that there is very little diversity within their programs. Like you said, diversity is the name of the game for the gay world, and to portray us as one-track group is far from telling of the real world.

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^^Richard, I totally agree with you! I get so sick of the whole gay stereotype that we are all big, huge, flaming queens that do drag and whore around every chance we get. It makes me sick! There are some of us that are masculine, hairy, heavily tattooed and like extreme sports. We are all different, but every "gay" movie that comes out, mainstream or not, portrays us in the way I first stated. The only two that have not are Brokeback Mountain and The Kids are Alright. I really wish that the media and Hollywood could see ALL of us in a different light. We are very diverse.

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^Although the majority of gay movies do portray a lot of us in that manner, there are quite a few that don't. A Beautiful Thing, Shelter, A Single Man (insanely depressing though), Get Real, Mambo Italiano, etc. There are also quite a few that try to cover the whole spectrum in order to appeal to the most people. I don't know if I'd consider gay movies to portray the stereotype quite as much as LOGO is. Many films certainly do, but there are a lot of great films out there that don't.

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I found the recent conversation rather interesting, so I thought I'd chime in with my own perspective on the matter...if you all don't mind.

 

In listening to your opinions on how you feel you're currently viewed on screen in today's world, I couldn't help but think one overwhelming thought.....Congratulations, welcome to the mainstream, guys!!

 

Don't get me wrong, I understand and recognize your concerns. However, from the perspective of a straight man with what I like to think is a fairly realistic look on the world, it seems like you all have finally achieved a huge victory in a sense. Think of it this way. While it does seem that the overwhelming majority of gay roles on TV and in the movies suggest that you're all "flaming drama queens," at least you can join the ranks of women, blacks, southerners, and so many others.

 

I mean, if we all believed most of what we saw on screen, then women are still inferior to men, blacks are just comedy pawns, everyone in the south is a dumb redneck, and all gays are drama queens, right? See what I'm saying? You guys finally made it!!

 

Seriously though, if now your biggest hurdle is being represented more evenly, then I'd consider it a HUGE accomplishment, since I can still remember when even the thought of a homosexual relationship on primetime TV was too taboo to even suggest. Hell, LOGO back then? Yeah, that was like thinking a black man would be President. Truth is, comedy breaks down walls, and the way most gays are viewed today is a direct result of the one thing that helped the gay community become more widely accepted in mainstream culture.....sitcoms.

 

Ellen, Will and Grace, Modern Family, and others all served to help us laugh at each other, and ultimately start to accept our differences. Your points are valid that the "flamboyant" characters naturally stand out, but just like any group, making Hollywood buy into the thought that equality across the board shall reign is an uphill battle. The roles will come....it just takes time.

 

Heck, I caught a glimpse of that show with Damon Wayons' kid the other week (Happy Endings?). And while it seemed like it was trying too hard to be funny, it had its moments. And along the lines of this discussion, it also had a "manly" gay character that, for all outward appearances, was "just one of the guys."

 

It just takes time.

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^ Let me echo all that you just said there. Growing up in the 70's and early 80's, I'd have killed to see a bitchy, queeny gay person on TV or in the movies. That would have been one more gay person than was on there at the time!

 

By the time I was out in the late 80's, gays had started to be shown in the media, but primarily in the stereotypes of the time: gay male victims (of AIDS, bashing or suicide) and lesbian/bi female phycho killers. I came out with a vengeance, as a radical activist involved with Queer Nation (helping to found the Boston chapter), ACT UP and others. My first National Coming Out Day, I personally was on ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN NATIONAL news broadcasts, among ACT UP members demanding treatments for our friends with HIV/AIDS. I was on the front page of the Boston Herald in the 80's in an unprecedented photo of me kissing a man in a New England Press Association news photo of the year. I gave away the ending of Basic Instinct on a major Boston talk show hosted by Tom Bergeron, who's now huge for hosting Dancing with the Stars.

 

What I remember most of that era was all the flack we got from the "good gays" who thought that we were taking things too far and being "too in-your face" and "too militant". People didn't understand that our motto/chant of "We're Here. We're queer. Get used to it!" wasn't a temper tantrum or a silly game; it was a recipe for political and social change. People didn't understand why we focused more on visibility and getting positive views of gays in the media than in politicians and laws. But we understood that politics always FOLLOWS social awareness, not the other way around. (And we worked with established groups on political issues when it would be effective, like in getting increased AIDS/HIV finding and in getting the gay civil rights bill passed in states like MA.) We focused on Hollywood and the media, shaming the bigots and closet cases (often one and the same) there to do more to promote positive images of gays in the media for the next generation of gay kids to have as role models in ways we'd never had, to aid in their own coming out process. People didn't understand why we were putting out an aggressive in-your-face stereotype out there, rather than relying on the sympathy of being seen as victims, not understanding that we were reacting to a nationwide wave of bashings that was partially because we were seen as victims that wouldn't fight back if you took your frustrations out on us or robbed us.

 

Well, it all worked. In short, they GOT USED TO IT. The wave of bashings quickly ended. Hollywood gave in and started showing more positive images, pushed by closet cases shamed into doing the right thing and guilt-ridden liberals, with Ellen and Will and Grace opening up the floodgates. We're all over reality shows, thanks to the pioneering efforts of the openly gay producer of the original Real World and Road Rules reality shows on MTV, followed by Survivor, Amazing Race, the original Big Brother in the UK, Queer Eye and so many others. We got a wave of gay rights laws passed nationwide, starting with MA. We stopped the utter decimation of the gay male community to AIDS by forcing the government to change the way it tests drugs and forcing the government and the drug companies to try new kinds of anti-HIV drugs, which actually WORKED (saving millions of lives in the process!) While growing up gay is still tough, it's miles easier than it was when I was a kid. There are support groups and internet forums and gay/straight alliances down to middle school (unlike just in select colleges in the 80's). There's the Trevor Project and It Gets Better, and most gay kids know other gay kids, either personally, or at least on tv or the net. Almost everyone in the country knows at least one gay person, and many are friends or family with us. Hell, we even have discussions like this on internet forums like this. You don't have to go to parks where you might get killed to get laid when you can just go on your phone or computer and log on to Manhunt or Grindr. And all of this is paying off both socially and politically. When I was getting arrested in 1987 at the MA state house trying to get a law passed that simply made it illegal to fire someone for being gay, we could have never imagined that just 20 years later, we'd be demanding -- and WINNING -- gay marriage here! Or that at this point, gay marriage nationwide -- and in much of the world (well, at least the Americas and Europe) -- seems pretty inevitable, even if it will take time.

 

Think about this. When I was in high school, the idea of saying that you shouldn't be able to fire someone for being gay was pretty controversial. Now, only 25 years later, the majority of Americans actually supports making gay marriage legal. Only two states had gay rights laws then. Now gay MARRIAGE is legal in ten countries and six US states (plus DC and Mexico City)! That's unprecedented national social change for such a short period of time.

 

So, yeah, I'm ok with a bunch of bitchy queens on Logo! Not that I actually watch it. But I'm glad it's there.

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^Being 23 I obviously didn't see this evolution personally, but I thank you and the others that helped push for equality. I know how hard it could get for me when I was younger and I had a family that I knew wouldn't care and friends that I know didn't care. I can't imagine how tough it must have gotten before America began accepting us as a whole. It really is amazing how quickly the country and world has progressed.

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What I find most interesting about this topic, and to BeemerBoy's point, is that in this age where there is a world of information at your fingertips, the shows on TV and cable getting the most attention are the ones that show people in the worst light. Out here in California we're a world away from New Jersey, so it's easy to believe that everyone out there acts just like those "characters" on The Jersey Shore, or the Housewives, or any of those people on those shows.

 

I don't think this issue is specific to us gays, but I understand how if feels when these shows are supposedly about us. And, they all seem to be showing just one type of gay (even if it's a very real type -- bitchy drag queens do exist; I know this because I am one, or was at one time many years ago). This is why it is so important for us to be out in our own lives, so we can show all those we touch in our lives how diverse our community really is. Play sports, ride coasters, enjoy opera, just do what you do as your authentic self. People will get it faster when they know someone personally who isn't like the stereotypes they see on TV.

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^ Ron, I think your last point is the most important one....interact with people. Don't let TV executives continue to manipulate the rest of lazy, narrow-minded America into thinking what they see on the tube is what life is completely like.

 

As you were posting, I was actually going back over R.D.'s response, and a similar thought was occurring to me. Wouldn't you guys say the complaining about Logo's lineup isn't really so much about "The network should portray us better," as much as it is, "I just really don't care for the programming anymore." I mean, it's not like the network is catering to straight America.

 

It's really the same as everyone bitching about the History Channel never actually showing any "history" anymore, The Learning Channel never showing anything educational anymore, or ESPN going to bed with the NFL, LeBron, and the Yankees and Red Sox, right?

 

Judging by the sentiments here, Logo is really no different than any other network these days. Executives realize that train wrecks sell, and that's just the way it is. Unfortunately, too many Americans buy into that crap.

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I personally like LOGO. The A-List was such a train wreck that I couldn't stop watching it.

 

That being said, I don't actually watch it that often. When I do, it is not for the lighter fare gay movies. It is for the shows like 1 girl 5 gays.

 

At 40, I do remember a time when a television network (even cable) geared towards gay people would have been a joke. I consider the "movies" they show to be rather bland (especially when edited for television,) but I still love the fact that there is a network (and the requisite advertisers) that is catering to an LGBT audience.

 

For movies, IMDB and Netflix have shown me wonderful movies like Strapped, A Beautiful Thing, Bear Cub, Shank, Release, A Four Letter Word, etc...

 

And for the record...I absolutely LOVE RuPauls Drag Race!

 

There is nothing wrong with being a rather sterotypical gay guy. I take care of myself, love to cook, throw amazing dinner parties and can shop like a demon. I can also work on a car, restore a house and listen to whatever damn music I please from Lady Gaga and Madonna, to the Sisters of Mercy and Pansy Division. It saddens me that "sterotypical" gay guys are treated like pariahs by their own community .

 

Oh well, I'm here, I'm queer - deal with it

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