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ADHD and Front of the Line Privileges


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I know this may sound a little dumb, but I think a 30 min wait can actually ad to the ride experience. If you've never been on the ride before and you don't know what to expect, it builds up the anticipation and makes it more fun. If you're uncertain about what the ride's gonna be like and you only have to wait 5 minutes, it's not as fun. If you've been on the ride before, of course a short line is better, but if its not, learn to deal with it.

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  • 1 year later...

Anyone still out there?

 

Any updates? Will Six Flags, Cedar, etc., give front of line privileges to folks with ADD/ADHD?

 

I know someone that is clinically diagnosed with ADD, ADHD, has tourettes syndrome, PTSD, dissociation issues, etc. You wouldn't notice it like you would with someone who is retarded (whats the modern word to use?) or in a wheelchair, but he suffers.

 

Sometimes he will go to a park, and leave out of the anxiety it causes and not wait in any line over 10 minutes. It's way too much for him. I would like to see him enjoy parks and have a good time.

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ADHD is not a disability, much like drug addiction is not a disease.

 

Saying addiction is not a disease is like saying HIV and diabetes are not diseases, or disabilities. (All reportedly caused by underlying issues, or the 'real problem').

 

ADHD and drug addiction (including the hard drug/narcotic Alcohol and the hard drug Nicotine) are both listed in the DSM - the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Of course most people can have a manageable life on nicotine , and most folks are ok with occasional (or consistently stupid drunk) - but not a REAL (clinically diagnosed) addict.

 

Unfortunately, ADD/ADHD, depression and related have gained much 'popularity' over the past 10 years, especially. All those conditions are not black and white, everything is a continuum. So someone who may joke "yeah im ADD" may have had a doctor (non-Psychiatrist) tell them that, but that same person perhaps hasn't been hospitalized for that condition (or another condition they have relating to it.)

 

Just adding info to an old thread (and technical responses), just in case anyone is reading

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^Do people get hospitalized for AD/HD?

 

Anyway, I used to think AD/HD was one of those made up disorders until after I described to a doctor a problem I was having with a class I was taking. He prescribed an AD/HD medication for me. Before I filled the prescription I did some reading, online tests, etc. I never had much of the "H" part of it but have trouble concentrating, staying focused, etc. I think the criteria for diagnosing it has changed so people diagnosed with AD/HD may experience and deal with things differently.

As far as waiting in lines at theme parks, like most people, I look at it as the nature of the beast and it's never too intolerable for me.

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Sorry, but many have suffered from ADD/ADHD over the years. Most of us have dealt with it and became adjusted over time. Yes, it is a struggle to concentrate, focus, write, have conversations, stand around or do anything for a prolonged time. But if you are not forced to work your way through situations the issue will not be solved. Pandering to the issue in the form of front of the line privileges is a short term fix and does not solve the problem.

Edited by larrygator
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^ Excellent post, Larry.

 

ADHD is not a disability, much like drug addiction is not a disease.

 

Saying addiction is not a disease is like saying HIV and diabetes are not diseases, or disabilities. (All reportedly caused by underlying issues, or the 'real problem').

As I type this, I'm a rather normal functioning and healthy adult, devoid of any prescribed medications, etc., etc. Let's say I become depressed over something, and start drinking heavily and regularly to ease the pain........am I now "diseased," or suffering from a weakened mental state? [/devil's advocate]

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I don't buy into the alcohol is a disease argument either.

 

"Some critics of the disease model argue alcoholism is a choice, not a disease, and stripping alcohol abusers of their choice, by applying the disease concept, is a threat to the health of the individual; the disease concept strips the substance abuser of responsibility."

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Just to add my thoughts...

My best friend has ADHD and never got front of the line privileges for having it. That was probably due to the fact that he was able to control it most of the time and act normally. Albeit he had medicine, on the days he forgot to take it he brought a pen and would click it.

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I have ADHD and I think that it's ludicrous that parks would cave in to people just because they have ADHD and don't want to wait. Hell, I'm not jumpy or anything like that when I'm in line. I just relax and listen to my Ipod.

 

...That, and because unlike a lot of people with ADHD, I actually take my pills.

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^ Excellent post, Larry.

 

ADHD is not a disability, much like drug addiction is not a disease.

 

Saying addiction is not a disease is like saying HIV and diabetes are not diseases, or disabilities. (All reportedly caused by underlying issues, or the 'real problem').

As I type this, I'm a rather normal functioning and healthy adult, devoid of any prescribed medications, etc., etc. Let's say I become depressed over something, and start drinking heavily and regularly to ease the pain........am I now "diseased," or suffering from a weakened mental state? [/devil's advocate]

 

If you start drinking, can't stop and have horrible negative consequences (there are million) such as... anything - loss of job, you blackout and kill someone, have withdrawal seizures... etc. If you continue to drink heavily in light of those negative consequences, you would probably be a real "Addict."

 

People who have compulsive sex due to emotional issues, for example getting depressed over time, and become host to HIV or any other form of disease, are they 'diseased'?

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^I would say no, because the key thing is that your examples are things that happen over time. You can choose not to drink or do so in moderation far before the affects of alcoholism set in. If you have compulsive sex because of emotional issues, that doesn't stop you from using a love glove. And depression can be combated with medication and therapy.

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People who have compulsive sex due to emotional issues, for example getting depressed over time, and become host to HIV or any other form of disease, are they 'diseased'?

Well, um, yeah. Just by simple definition of the body hosting a, wait for it........DISEASE. And to bring it back to the original point of the thread....they don't deserve to skip the line either.

 

 

 

 

Scott "I'm obviously not gonna win this one" B.

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I guess my point here is that... if someone REALLY cannot wait in line do to ANY illness (including ADD/ADHD, etc.) AND they have a doctor who is responsible enough to determine that - and honest - then a note from the doctor should be enough to get a go to front of line pass.

 

Many people are told they are ADD/ADHD, but the illness isn't severe enough to warrant a skip the line pass. It's not a black or white issue is a good point.

 

I don't think being labled ADD/ADHD alone is enough - but many people who may be ADD/ADHD may have a list of illnesses (such as PTSD, Touretes, etc.). The doctor should make the determination.

 

Don't you actually need a doctors note to qualify to skip the line anyway?

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I guess my point here is that... if someone REALLY cannot wait in line do to ANY illness (including ADD/ADHD, etc.) AND they have a doctor who is responsible enough to determine that - and honest - then a note from the doctor should be enough to get a go to front of line pass.

 

Many people are told they are ADD/ADHD, but the illness isn't severe enough to warrant a skip the line pass. It's not a black or white issue is a good point.

 

I don't think being labled ADD/ADHD alone is enough - but many people who may be ADD/ADHD may have a list of illnesses (such as PTSD, Touretes, etc.). The doctor should make the determination.

 

Don't you actually need a doctors note to qualify to skip the line anyway?

 

How exactly does this "disabled" person survive sitting in a car for a hour?

 

And how would you insure uniform action from doctors? People are able to manipulate doctors for a doctor's note.

 

Sorry, I just can't subscribe to this point of view.

Edited by larrygator
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I can't subscribe to the ADHD/ADD debate, but what I can do is express that I dislike people with broken legs, inability to walk long distances, wearing a heart monitor, etc being allowed to bypass the lines. People who need the use of wheel chair etc should, IMO, have to wait in line just as long as everyone else. Sure, they may need to come up the exit as it's a ramp, or use the lift/elevator, but should be treated like everyone else. If the line is 20 minutes, they wait 20 minutes. There is nothing more irritating to me than to watch a person who gets up off their little rascal and walks to the front of train with their entire 10 member family in tow. I've honestly thought about renting one of those and say I can't walk far and bring a few friends to "help" me. Just my opinion.

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^^I agree. I was at Disney world a year ago and my entire family noticed that. While waiting in line for Soarin' (which was like a 70 minute wait), at least 40 people came by with a wheelchair person. Half the time it would be one person in a wheelchair and 7 other people. It's not like the actual line isn't big enough to handle the wheelchair either. They should have to wait in line too.

 

On the same trip in the Magic Kingdom, I was walking behind a women in one of those electric scooters and her husband. She says that she has to go to the bathroom, stops the scooter, stands up and walks away without a problem. Her husband sits down in the thing and keeps going. Do they just give those things out? I stood there like, "I bet you do that to cut the line."

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I don't know if there are any parks that do this, but here is what I think would be a good system for people that can't wait in the regular line.

 

First, the party needs to get a pass from guest relations or some other general information center that clearly states the number of people in the party and the reason why someone in the party is unable to wait in line. When they get to the ride, a member of the party goes to either the greeter or (if there is no greeter) goes up the exit and gets a pass from one of the operators. This pass has a return time that is roughly equivalent to the current wait in line. When this time is reached, the party goes up the exit to the station. The disabled person and one or two helpers wait to one side of the station while the remainder of the party goes across and merges in at the row selection point of the line. When they board the train, the disabled person and their helper(s) enter and board on the same train in the available seats in selected rows. In the event that a party only has one or two members, they just tell the operator what row they want and after the appropriate number of cycles the operator blocks that row and allows them to board.

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It's not like the actual line isn't big enough to handle the wheelchair either. They should have to wait in line too.

 

I do know that Universal has made their queue lines large enough for people with wheel chairs to be pushed through them. Though I have still seen people push their way up the exit and jump right on.

 

And back to the topic of ADHD, make them wait. BS diagnosis in my opinion. Just some doctor who doesn't want to deal with a hyper kid and gives him/her Adderall for tax purposes. (Sorry for those of you who have said that you have ADHD, I am "attacking" with doctors, not you).

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