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Six Flags New England (SFNE) Discussion Thread


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^Skyrush sends a telegram.

Say what you will about the restraints, but those trains are not poorly designed - they're one hell of an innovation if I've ever seen one.

 

Ok so the restraints are so overpowerlingly bad that it kind of makes all the other complaints seem insignificant, but they also happen to be the ugliest coaster trains ever built (they look like platforms on wheels with office chairs bolted onto them), and the ride is extremely rough compared to other Intamins. Also, the wing seats are a gimmick that limit what they can do as far as transitions and elements. I love the ride particularly in the wing seats so for me that last one isn't so much of a drawback, but if you're one of those people that hates it, that could easily be seen as a bad thing.

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^Skyrush sends a telegram.

Say what you will about the restraints, but those trains are not poorly designed - they're one hell of an innovation if I've ever seen one.

I couldn't agree more. In fact, I would argue the inverse in terms of their "poor design". I think they are probably the most comfortable trains I have ever had the pleasure of placing my rear in (sorry B&M). The padding comes off for easy cleaning and replacement which if you ask me, is pretty nifty. They offer a glassy smooth ride and the suspension system built into the trains is in my opinion, a work of art. In response to the lap bar complaint, I don't believe the lap bars themselves are heavy, I think think that effect comes from the hydraulics and there's probably a reason for that. RMC has the resources to make lap bars that act similarly to that of B&M or Intamin, I think they chose not to.

Yes, those shocks are such a work of art. Such a great work of art that the shocks were actually replaced by tubes of rubber because they were destroying themselves and the wheels. You obviously haven't ridden Goliath at SFGAm this year, because that glass smooth ride is disappearing quickly after just over a year of the ride being open. There's a reason that most other coaster trains don't have 4 separate removable pieces of padding per seat. Just wait a couple years and you won't think those trains are so marvelous.

A good point, but I speculate that problem may be particular to Goliath. I haven't been hearing a whole lot of complaints about Medusa or Outlaw Run yet. Both those use the same trains, but the only thing I can think of that could separate Goliath's trains from others are it's wheels. It seems that Six Flags will change the wheel combo depending on the coaster so it wouldn't surprise me if the complaints about smoothness could be the result of a set of bad wheeles. Also, I noticed that the top wheel has its own suspension system, similar to that of a car. It's held by two brackets, one on either side of the wheel and assembly pivots on one end of the bracket and the other is connected to the shock absorber. If your claims are true, and Six Flags replaced the shock absorbers with a cheaper alternative, any vibrations would go directly from the wheels to the rest of the chassi. This same idea would apply to the vibration problem on one of Wicked Cyclone's trains. If one or both the shock absorbers is too stiff or is no longer working, vibrations would become much more pronounced.

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^Skyrush sends a telegram.

Say what you will about the restraints, but those trains are not poorly designed - they're one hell of an innovation if I've ever seen one.

I couldn't agree more. In fact, I would argue the inverse in terms of their "poor design". I think they are probably the most comfortable trains I have ever had the pleasure of placing my rear in (sorry B&M). The padding comes off for easy cleaning and replacement which if you ask me, is pretty nifty. They offer a glassy smooth ride and the suspension system built into the trains is in my opinion, a work of art. In response to the lap bar complaint, I don't believe the lap bars themselves are heavy, I think think that effect comes from the hydraulics and there's probably a reason for that. RMC has the resources to make lap bars that act similarly to that of B&M or Intamin, I think they chose not to.

Yes, those shocks are such a work of art. Such a great work of art that the shocks were actually replaced by tubes of rubber because they were destroying themselves and the wheels. You obviously haven't ridden Goliath at SFGAm this year, because that glass smooth ride is disappearing quickly after just over a year of the ride being open. There's a reason that most other coaster trains don't have 4 separate removable pieces of padding per seat. Just wait a couple years and you won't think those trains are so marvelous.

A good point, but I speculate that problem may be particular to Goliath. I haven't been hearing a whole lot of complaints about Medusa or Outlaw Run yet. Both those use the same trains, but the only thing I can think of that could separate Goliath's trains from others are it's wheels. It seems that Six Flags will change the wheel combo depending on the coaster so it wouldn't surprise me if the complaints about smoothness could be the result of a set of bad wheeles. Also, I noticed that the top wheel has its own suspension system, similar to that of a car. It's held by two brackets, one on either side of the wheel and assembly pivots on one end of the bracket and the other is connected to the shock absorber. If your claims are true, and Six Flags replaced the shock absorbers with a cheaper alternative, any vibrations would go directly from the wheels to the rest of the chassi. This same idea would apply to the vibration problem on one of Wicked Cyclone's trains. If one or both the shock absorbers is too stiff or is no longer working, vibrations would become much more pronounced.

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^Skyrush sends a telegram.

Say what you will about the restraints, but those trains are not poorly designed - they're one hell of an innovation if I've ever seen one.

I couldn't agree more. In fact, I would argue the inverse in terms of their "poor design". I think they are probably the most comfortable trains I have ever had the pleasure of placing my rear in (sorry B&M). The padding comes off for easy cleaning and replacement which if you ask me, is pretty nifty. They offer a glassy smooth ride and the suspension system built into the trains is in my opinion, a work of art. In response to the lap bar complaint, I don't believe the lap bars themselves are heavy, I think think that effect comes from the hydraulics and there's probably a reason for that. RMC has the resources to make lap bars that act similarly to that of B&M or Intamin, I think they chose not to.

Yes, those shocks are such a work of art. Such a great work of art that the shocks were actually replaced by tubes of rubber because they were destroying themselves and the wheels. You obviously haven't ridden Goliath at SFGAm this year, because that glass smooth ride is disappearing quickly after just over a year of the ride being open. There's a reason that most other coaster trains don't have 4 separate removable pieces of padding per seat. Just wait a couple years and you won't think those trains are so marvelous.

A good point, but I speculate that problem may be particular to Goliath. I haven't been hearing a whole lot of complaints about Medusa or Outlaw Run yet. Both those use the same trains, but the only thing I can think of that could separate Goliath's trains from others are it's wheels. It seems that Six Flags will change the wheel combo depending on the coaster so it wouldn't surprise me if the complaints about smoothness could be the result of a set of bad wheeles. Also, I noticed that the top wheel has its own suspension system, similar to that of a car. It's held by two brackets, one on either side of the wheel and assembly pivots on one end of the bracket and the other is connected to the shock absorber. If your claims are true, and Six Flags replaced the shock absorbers with a cheaper alternative, any vibrations would go directly from the wheels to the rest of the chassi. This same idea would apply to the vibration problem on one of Wicked Cyclone's trains. If one or both the shock absorbers is too stiff or is no longer working, vibrations would become much more pronounced.

 

Medusa's trains are identical apart from the theming, and they're having plenty of issues too. OR is the only one that uses steel wheels and there's a reason why none of the others do. Six Flags didn't replace the shocks, RMC told them too. They weren't replaced to save money, they were replaced because the actual shock absorbers were causing issues. The trains on WC and TC are the third generation of the RMC trains, which proves that all trains previous had quite a few flaws.

I had no idea that RMC has several generations of their trains. I assumed (you know what they say about assuming) that the trains had remained consistent. Just out of curiosity, what changes were made between gen 2 and 3? I'm just wondering whether they finally worked out the kinks in the design...

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RMC and Six Flags are extremely disappointed in the trains. They plan to replace all of them with the original Gerstlauer trains in the next few years, but not before they replace all of the ibox track that has faded paint because it's ugly.

 

Oh my, it's so easy to make up B.S. and post it as if it's fact

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^LOL . To answer the previous question, I did my best to try and reverse engineer the trains using some pictures I found on the RMC website. After some close examination, it wan't to difficult to figure out how they work on a basic level. I'm not sure how he knows how and why they replaced the shocks on Goliath... that sort of thing doesn't seem like it would make for good business if it were to get out in the open. I suspect Six Flags and RMC would make some effort to keep it on the down low.

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^Unless you can explain where you're getting your information we have no reason to believe anything you're saying. No, I don't really think you're making up elaborate lies, but the claim that RMC designed the worst trains in history is pretty significant and needs to come from a reliable source. You have six posts all in this and the Great America thread. Are you a Six Flags employee who registered just to bash the company you work for? That's a pretty good way to get fired just FYI.

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Reading between the lines, I'd guess that the claim that they're the "worst coaster trains ever" wasn't invented by the poster, but by a maintenance person at Six Flags Great America. Working front line/crap jobs at theme parks, I heard stuff like that frequently. I remember one gentleman telling me how lousy of a designer he thought Larry Bill was while working on a consistently top ranked wood coaster. Doesn't mean Larry Bill is indeed the worst wooden coaster designer of a generation, just someone's take on having to fix up his ride. With that in mind, there's actually really interesting analysis of the trains and how they operate on the RMC rides located in this and what the operational differences are between them, even if you disagree with the poster's conclusions.

 

Realistically, given that RMC is a relatively new manufacturer doing a lot of generally new stuff, you have to anticipate that they will probably make lots of changes to the train/track/support structures as time goes forward and some trial and error takes place. Another wise man once pointed out to me that if you look at all the steel coasters Hopkins built, they basically all have different trains, track, and support designs indicating that they were constantly attempting to improve. Obviously with their rides being much lower cost and being constructed over a much longer period of time, those improvements were comparably glacial to what something like RMC will be doing given a slate of 3 or more new coasters each year.

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Realistically, given that RMC is a relatively new manufacturer doing a lot of generally new stuff, you have to anticipate that they will probably make lots of changes to the train/track/support structures as time goes forward and some trial and error takes place. Another wise man once pointed out to me that if you look at all the steel coasters Hopkins built, they basically all have different trains, track, and support designs indicating that they were constantly attempting to improve. Obviously with their rides being much lower cost and being constructed over a much longer period of time, those improvements were comparably glacial to what something like RMC will be doing given a slate of 3 or more new coasters each year.

To add to this - even the established manufacturers do this. The B&M inverted coaster trains have been redesigned twice, Intamin looping coaster trains twice (three if you count the launched coaster trains introduced on Storm Runner), Vekoma looping coaster trains three times - the list goes on.

 

The difference is that because Rocky Mountain is still relatively new, lots of little revisions are being made to their train design as opposed to big redesigns - until they nail it.

 

In the case of New England, Superman is a coaster that's had two generations of Intamin mega coaster riding on its tracks. Though, their second design was a little bit custom with the U-bars instead of the T-Bars, but wasn't that because of state regulations?

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fixed

 

I have yet to see anything concrete to make me optimistic about this transformation. If the train still rattles like a shopping cart and has big yellow blocks for lap bars then it won't really be any better.

 

We've discovered that the secret to getting a great ride on Superman Ride of Bizarro the Ride or whatever it's called this week is to ride it in the front. Everywhere else it's rattly and while it's still very good, it's not on the same level that it used to be.

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I prefer the Bizarro restraints slightly over the modified T bar restraint but the Bizarro restraints are not that great. They hit your thighs instead of going further back to your stomach area. The ride was originally supposed to have smaller restraints like El Toro (as seen in pictures) but they were modified and are now thicker. It would have been better if they kept the smaller ones because it would have been more like the old ride. And obviously MF has the best restraints.

 

I am interested to see if they modify the restraint at all. It would be awesome if they use smaller ones instead of the bulky ones. I am almost positive they will replace the restraints though because they were in very poor condition this year.

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