Jump to content
  TPR Home | Parks | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Instagram 

Possible GP question


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

So I have noticed that every roller coaster I have ridden has staff checking restraints, but they also have someone usually in a room with windows just watching what the others are doing. What is that persons job?

 

As I say, the only GP question is the question not asked. You're probably talking about the ride operator. A high functioning coaster has the following positions:

 

Greeter: First person or persons you see when you enter the queue line. They answer some questions for the guests, stare them down to make sure they'll be able to get on the ride, and not have to get a locker for their loose items, take care of the first round of priority queue obligations or watch the single rider line, and do other duties as necessary.

 

Crowd Control: Person or persons that you see that separate the queue line from the station. They stop people from entering and have them wait periodically and make sure that the station doesn't get too crowded. They manage the flow between the priority queue and the main queue. They're the last line of defense to make sure that the guests can ride and that their loose articles are taken care of in adherence with the park policy.

 

Restraint Checkers: The man the station, and ensure that the restraints are properly in place and that all guests are safe.

 

Ride Operator: He/she sits in the control booth, look for signals from the restraint checkers, and dispatch the train when its ready. This is usually the highest level of employee stationed in the a ride -- considered to be "operating heavy machinery."

 

Even higher functioning parks will also have employees roving around the queue line, monitoring, answering questions, and managing the flow of guests.

 

 

Lower functioning parks or parks operating at partial capacity will sacrificing the rovers, the greeters, and the crowd control. Its generally difficult to properly allow a priority queue with only restraint checkers and a ride op, but when crowds are light enough, full capacity may not be needed.

 

So what you were referring to probably describes the ride operator. Some people casually call all employees on a ride a "ride operator" or "ride op" but technically that just refers to the employee at the control panel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even higher functioning parks will also have employees roving around the queue line, monitoring, answering questions, and managing the flow of guests.

 

Where is this a thing? I've only seen this at parks where it was necessary because the queue was split by a midway and they were just there to pulse the line because they had to be because it was either a stupid or abnormally massive queue. I've never seen a park pay someone to walk around a queue and answer questions. That sounds totally pointless.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never seen a park pay someone to walk around a queue and answer questions. That sounds totally pointless.

Example, Avatar Flight of Passage, you have one person at the entrance to the caves pulsing guests (but only when it's crowded). However, you don't see any more cast members after that until the up / down link chamber split.

 

At Kumba, I think I saw five people total. There was one person at the entrance greeting and checking heights, two people checking harnesses (one for each side), one person standing around, and one person in the overhead booth. In a pinch, I would bet that you could run a coaster with a crew of three people. But it's definitely a benefit to have that fourth person at the ride entrance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even higher functioning parks will also have employees roving around the queue line, monitoring, answering questions, and managing the flow of guests.

 

Where is this a thing? I've only seen this at parks where it was necessary because the queue was split by a midway and they were just there to pulse the line because they had to be because it was either a stupid or abnormally massive queue. I've never seen a park pay someone to walk around a queue and answer questions. That sounds totally pointless.

 

I've been going to Disney a lot lately and Universal some. Its expensive to fully staff your parks, but it does help. Plus, remember that at the theme parks, the line is almost a part of the ride, so in many ways, you need some staff to make sure that the guests are going through at the right times. Sure, the amusement parks where there's little to no theming and/or the lines are always very manageable, parks can feel free to remove staff as needed. Or, as you were saying, not even consider having staff in certain areas at all.

 

But even at the amusement parks, you'll see a lot of staff on certain rides that are excessive and not realize it. Think about the log flume-ish rides and their derivatives. You'll see employees chilling at the top of the drops reading books to kill the time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I have noticed that every roller coaster I have ridden has staff checking restraints, but they also have someone usually in a room with windows just watching what the others are doing. What is that persons job?

As I say, the only GP question is the question not asked.

know.gif.5d1ca10c31757459e6fa75d04fcc459a.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use https://themeparkreview.com/forum/topic/116-terms-of-service-please-read/