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coasterBro

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Everything posted by coasterBro

  1. This. All of this. Also, my first thought after seeing 'World's First Racing Launch Coaster' was that that was complete marketing BS. The quad-launched Fiorano GT Challenge at Ferrari World was the first other racing launch coaster to come to mind. Don't call something a 'World's First' when it isn't. Call it the world's first launched Möbius racing coaster instead.
  2. Actually I'm told that the official live stream will actually be here: https://www.instagram.com/westcoastcustoms/ West Coast Customs is a custom car company...... Are they sponsoring this attraction? West Coast Customs is a auto chop/detailing shop. They were made famous by MTV "Pimp My Ride" show in the early to mid 2000's featuring the rapper Xzibit as the host. So they're going to pimp out all the coasters? Put super massive chrome rims on all the coaster trains. Add pimp glow underneath all the cars. Install super massive 20 bajillion watt speakers into all the headrests. Replace the lining of the coaster seats with shag carpeting. And put sparkly paint on everything so it looks pimptastic.
  3. I ran into this last week. I was really confused why I fit fine on my first lap but then couldn't fit when I got back around to ride again. They put me in the seat in front of me and then I fit with plenty of clearance to spare. This kind of thing is what's so frustrating. When a ride isn't consistent from seat-to-seat or when the test seat doesn't match the actual ride. Or when the park keeps changing seatbelt lengths and buckle positions (lookin' at you, Wicked Twister). Or when a park has unusually short belts when compared to other comparable rides (a la CGA). I've ridden over 600 coasters, and I've never not fit on a coaster I've been trying to ride (5'7", 250lbs). That being said, I'm certain there's no chance I'd be able to fit in Wicked Twister now because of the new belt configuration. And I'm right on the threshold of being good in the standard B&M OTSR's vs needing the big-boy seats (and the difference can often be how late in the day it is and how much I've had to eat/drink throughout the day). I had in issue with El Toro this weekend where I fit, but the lapbar dug into my gut in a way that was quite painful during the ride and kept me from at all being able to enjoy the ride. And I don't think there's any fixing that short of simply losing weight. The scary thing to me is how many children's coasters I've been able to ride with restraints that really should be designed to keep a small child in place, not a chunky adult. And many of these rides have single-position lapbars. If the lapbar locks in a position where it's fitting me, there's no way in heck it's holding a kid securely. I get that the idea is if you're riding with your small child that you'll keep them from doing anything stupid, but I'm honestly surprised we haven't had more issues with kids getting loose from kiddie coaster restraints.
  4. So I swung through Sesame Place early on Sunday since I was in the area and have a SW Platinum Pass. Holy crap is Oscar's Wacky Taxi awesome. I was completely blown away that a ride with a 40" height requirement has that much solid airtime. By my count, you get 11 pops of air, pretty much wherever you sit (the back gets air over the first drop, while the front gets air entering the brake run, so it evens out). I was able to ride it a good number of times in a couple of hours since the rain kept a lot of the crowds away first thing. I don't think I waited more than 10mins. Is there a better coaster out there with this low of a height requirement? Also, I know capacity would be an issue at a lot of places, but every park that tries to cater to younger kids needs a coaster like this. It was simply brilliant. And not just brilliant for a kids' ride; I'd happily marathon it.
  5. So I was at the park on Sunday and had a few thoughts (in no particular order): I think Nitro is a bit underrated in the pantheon of B&M hypers. I never hear it really get talked about much, but it's actually really solid. I would put it solidly in my 2nd tier of hypers (somewhere in the 4-8 range). Holy crap everything at this park is spread out as far as it possibly can be from everything else. I don't exactly know why the park is laid out this way, but getting from one thing to another felt like it was a lot more inconvenient than it needed to be, even with rides that look like they're right next to each other on the map. You don't think mist on a roller coaster is that big of a deal until you're going 128mph. Then it's like being sandblasted in the face. I imagine a drizzle (or more) would have felt like being waterboarded. Ka was having all kinds of issues. It went up and down a bunch, and when I was finally able to get in like it seemed like it would launch a few trains, then they'd advance a train to the launch position and the 2nd train would stay in the rear station, and it would be 10 mins before they'd get the front train launched and the 2nd one emptied. I know the answer why is 'Six Flags', but it's really kind of depressing to see a ride that was designed with 4 stations and at least 4 trains (for some reason I was thinking 6, but I'm not sure) operate w/ one station & 2 trains. I get the staffing/cost thing & that they can't keep throughput high enough to really need the 2nd side, but I feel like they could at least run w/ 3 trains and use the rear station as an unload platform. That way, they'd always be unloading one train, loading another, and sending a third around the track. Zumanjaro is awesome. Absolutely brilliant ride. It sucks what it does to Ka's capacity though. And the aforementioned being out in the middle of nowhere thing. Has Ka always had the trim brake as you start going back down? El Toro. I always hear everybody talk about how awesome El Toro is and how much they love it. It was closed on my last visit, but on my first trip 6 years ago I didn't really like it because of the restraints (though I couldn't remember exactly why). Here's the deal: I'm a chunky guy (5'7". 250lbs), but I've never not fit in a roller coaster. The lap bar on El Toro has bits on the end that sort of make the part that faces you curve, presumably to match the contour of one's waist. Instead, those curved bits digs into my gut in a way that makes it feel like the lapbar is trying to rip my flab from the rest of my body as I'm flung around on the ride. It's an incredibly uncomfortable sensation, and one that I can probably only change by losing 50lbs. A standard Intamin T-bar like what's on Millennium Force (or even some of the less awesome ones like on the Superman coasters) would be fine, since those rest against the thighs. But the woodie restraints and I do not get along, which was a bummer for sure (especially since I'm going to be in Korea soon and will be planning to hit T Express). Skull Mountain was a surprise. I've ridden it before, but for some reason had it in my head that it was a lot less of a ride than it actually is. I was really impressed. So I know it's been gone for a while now, but what was the reason Six Flags got rid of Rolling Thunder? And why did they not demolish the part that's under El Toro? The loose article policy for Ka/Toro wasn't that awful, but both rides were only 10-15min waits. After I did a few laps on Zumanjaro and came back by Ka, the line had to have been well over an hour (if not longer), which would have been considerably less fun to wait in, especially if it kept breaking down every few launches. It's also silly that they have as few lockers as they do and only 2 kiosks at each ride (that for whatever reason people have a hard time figuring out how to use). Also, both times I got a locker, I got a fraud alert from my credit card company.
  6. The bridge hills on Ravine Flyer II are absolutely sublime. Those are my gold standard for sustained stand-up airtime.
  7. So maybe I'm biased from growing up with the awfulness that was the Ninja, but when they did the track work and replaced the trains to convert Ninja into Blue Hawk, the coaster literally moved up 300 spots in my steel ranking list. Yes, there are still a couple spots where if you aren't careful you might smack your head back into the headrest, but overall I have found it to be infinitely improved over what it used to be and what most Arrow & Vekoma looper experiences are. DDD isn't my cup of tea, personally, but I do think it's by far the smoothest of the Eurofighter coasters (even if it has the worst ops/capacity). It's not an overly extreme ride, but I find it to be generally enjoyable provided I don't have to wait more than 15-20mins for it (which is rare due to the aforementioned awful ops/capacity). Other than that, I generally agree with the rest of your review. SFOG is a quiet gem with a lot of really great rides. My personal thoughts on SFOG's ride collection: Goliath: top-3 B&M hyper (w/ Mako & Diamondback) MindBender: best steel coaster built before 1980 (if not 1990) Twisted Cyclone: best RMC (IMHO, even though I know most people are drinking the Steel Vengeance Kool-Aid) GA Scorcher: top-2 Stand-Up (w/ Riddler's Revenge at SFMM) Batman: an excellent cloned model that holds its own with the best of the inverts DDD: best Eurofighter Blue Hawk: best Vekoma sit-down looper (& in the convo w/ TN Tornado, which is my favorite Arrow looper) Superman: best US flying coaster (has the terrain interactions the other clones lack; Tatsu just floats about aimlessly above the trees; Manta is good but I think Superman edges it out) GASM: can go die in a fire. the most boring wooden coaster I've ridden outside of CGA's Grizzly. No airtime. No laterals. No 'classic nostalgia'. Just pointlessness. Mine Train: meh. Justice League: I've had worse luck on this one than any of the others, and it doesn't have an externally-accessible single rider line, which sucks Joker: best family coaster I've seen at a SF park Acrophobia: very good drop tower (if you can get over the uncomfortable seating position) Monster Mansion: stay out of the marsh. STAY OUT OF THE MARSH!! OH NOOOOOO!!!!!!!! You should havestopped at maybe I am biased. Goliath Top 3 B&M hypers? Twisted Cyclone the best RMC? Not even close, not even top 5, around 8 or 9. DDD best eurofighter? LOL! Superman v=best flyer? Again..lol. Tatsu is many times better. GA Scorcher top-2 Stand-Up (w/ Riddler's Revenge at SFMM)? Green Lantern as Gadv is better, there aren't many stand ups left. I won't go thru the rest but, the SFOG rose colored grasses are glaring.Can you even see straight with the distortion they are creating. I'm happy to elaborate and give some context to my opinions, and I welcome hearing your perspective. One of my favorite things about being a coaster enthusiast is that we all have different things we enjoy about rides, and so the way we look at different rides is shaded by that point of view. I enjoy contrasting my perspectives with others'. For Goliath, I think it gives good airtime in every seat, though the nature of that airtime changes as you move through the train (front is a strong pop as you crest the hill, back is a strong yank as you start down a hill, middle is floater all the way over the hill). The lack of a MCBR keeps the pacing up. The layout has good variation, including a nice helix, and doesn't have too many back-to-back parabolic hills (Intimidator & Behemoth come to mind), which tend to make me a little dizzy for some reason. Downsides are that for some reason they can't keep it running like the wheels are actually round, so it can rattle a bit; it is a bit short, both in height and in ride length; and overall Six Flags ops tend to drag the whole experience down a bit. With RMC's, I've now ridden all of them except Wildfire & RailBlazer (though I have ridden Wonder Woman). As a general rule, I do not particularly enjoy really short strong pops of ejector airtime. If it's sustained ejector air that's entered into smoothly, I'm fine with that. But a lot of RMC airtime is fractions of a second of getting slammed into the restraints, and I just don't find that enjoyable. I also don't enjoy strong laterals in the middle of airtime, which RMC's do a lot. Thirdly, I'm not a fan of super slow barrel roll or in-line twist inversions as I find flopping around in between the restraints and the seat to be not very fun, but I find straight hang-time to be enjoyable, so long as you get to that full-inversion point relatively quickly. So given all of the above, I actually do reasonably enjoy most RMC's, but most of them have at least a handful of elements that I really don't like. How much a pile of good stuff balances out against a pile of stuff I really dislike is a maddening question, which makes ranking a lot of RMC's a challenge for me. I really really loved the GA Cyclone and was very sad they decided to RMC it. I firmly expected Twisted Cyclone to be a good ride and very popular amongst the general populous, but figured that I wouldn't love it as much as I had loved the original based on my prior experience with RMC's. Then I rode it and was completely blown away. It so far exceeded my expectations that I can't help but gush about it. What makes Twisted Cyclone so great for me is that it does all the things I love about RMC's with none of the stuff I hate. The inversions are enjoyable, and I think the 'reverse cobra roll' is excellent. That's followed by probably the best wave turn RMC has ever made. The ejector hill after the next turnaround is great because it pays tribute to the ejector hill on the original GA Cyclone (which I really loved). The smaller pops of airtime throughout the ride aren't sharp enough to cause the kind of discomfort I experience on other RMC's. The fact that they didn't try for a third lap is a huge asset to the ride, as that tends to be where RMC will resort to manufacturing 'cheap' airtime by using tiny, sharply profiled hills, and I really really do not enjoy that. In fact, the last element of the ride is kind of a slalom sort of thing that gets you up into the brake run. It isn't trying to be a trick-track or some other nonsense, and it isn't awkwardly shaped and jarring. The whole ride experience is excellent, with literally nothing I would change. And that's why it's my favorite RMC. For what it's worth, #2 is Iron Rattler. #3 is Goliath at SFGAm. #4 is New Texas Giant. #5 is Twisted Colossus (when dueling). Most of the rest of the RMC's fit into the 'have a bunch of good stuff and a bunch of stuff I don't like' situation, which makes them hard to rank against each other. For instance, Twisted Timbers to me is just Storm Chaser 2.0 (it does all the best stuff of SC, except more and better, but it also does more of the worst stuff of SC that I really really disliked). How does that balance out? Medusa didn't really get a fair shake due to being slowed down for VR when I was there. I found Joker to be not very memorable in any fashion, good or bad. Outlaw Run is absolutely my least favorite RMC, hands down. For DDD, I've ridden a lot of Eurofighters, and almost all of them have OTSR's and bad headbanging problems. There are chunks with bad track/transition shaping, and they tend to just not be terribly fun for me. Dare Devil Dive has lapbar restraints, is butter smooth, and has an interesting (albeit forceless) layout. I don't enjoy the barrel roll ending, but overall I think it's a solid ride. That being said, this weekend I rode Hydrus at Casino Pier, and Hydrus may be the best Eurofighter I've ever ridden (despite being short and $10/ride). For Superman, the thing I like is that it has really good terrain interaction. I prefer the one at SFOG over the 2 clones for this reason, particularly since the other two were basically just plopped on flat land. I don't have Tatsu ranked as highly because I don't feel that it interacts with the terrain really at all. Other than the pretzel loop, it feels like it's just meandering around above the treetops, with the occasional inversion. In a lot of ways, Tatsu reminds me of Volcano, which I also feel is kind of a wasted ride that starts off great but then doesn't go anywhere. But I know a lot of people love these rides, and they probably enjoy the swooping around way up high more than they would tight terrain interactions. I have Manta in the middle. For Scorcher, it's short & sweet, which is great for stand-ups. It was also my first looping coaster, so there's at least somewhat of a nostalgia factor. It's widely regarded as one of the best ones, so I don't think I'm too far off. Depending on whether I'm in the mood for a short or long ride, that will affect whether I lean towards Scorcher or Riddler's, but Green Lantern is my #3. I don't have anything against it; I just prefer the other two a little more. I look forward to hearing your thoughts!
  8. Maybe I'll have to give GASM another try. I can't remember the last time I got any airtime at all on the ride. But thinking back, it's possible that a lot of the times I've ridden it in recent years have been with a Flash Pass, which dumps you into the middle of the train. Thanks for the tip!
  9. I eventually ruled out the "backwards Racer" idea since at this year's Coasterstock event during Q&A, they said Racer was never really designed to be running backwards in the first place. I've heard that before, but that doesn't mean it couldn't be done. No idea how many hoops it would take (or how much it'd cost), but if they really wanted to, I'm sure there's a way.
  10. Is it a nice addition? Yes. Will it be good for families? Yes. Will it hopefully begin to bring some life back to the old Midway area of the park? Sure. Did it need to be announced on National Roller Coaster Day? Probably not. I think if they had made this announcement yesterday, people probably wouldn't be getting quite so worked up about it. Personally, I kind of expected something like this (especially once I saw the press kit that went out with a tiny little Ford key in the back of the scrapbook), but I was also kind of hoping for it to be part of a full Midway area revitalization with some love on Racer (and maybe a backwards train again?) and some more flats and landscaping and lighting and stuff like Cedar Point did around Gemini. I understand that we can't always get what we want though, and I'm now looking forward to whatever B&M goodness comes in 2020.
  11. I think this will be a solid addition to the park, and that tunnel looks sick. I like the new inversions, but for me the best part of a dive coaster has always been getting whipped over the drops (back row) and floating around between the seat and the restraint. The vest restraints on Valravn took away the float, and now this is taking away the nice 2nd drop. Will it be a good ride? Sure. But for what I enjoy, I would have rather them have found a way to keep a big drop after the MCBR (maybe Dive Loop->MCBR->Veritcal Drop->Vertical Loop?). I don't have a problem with the helix though.
  12. My favorite part of the Six Flags grand social media plan is how they'll do some kind of coordinated blast where all the parks are trying to promote something for their local park, but they all use photos of rides that aren't in that park. They do the same thing in their commercials all the time too. I think they've at least gotten better about not featuring other parks' coasters in their merch though.
  13. Wait... so maybe I missed it somewhere, but wallets are kosher? I was under the impression it was everything. If it's made of leather...
  14. So maybe I'm biased from growing up with the awfulness that was the Ninja, but when they did the track work and replaced the trains to convert Ninja into Blue Hawk, the coaster literally moved up 300 spots in my steel ranking list. Yes, there are still a couple spots where if you aren't careful you might smack your head back into the headrest, but overall I have found it to be infinitely improved over what it used to be and what most Arrow & Vekoma looper experiences are. DDD isn't my cup of tea, personally, but I do think it's by far the smoothest of the Eurofighter coasters (even if it has the worst ops/capacity). It's not an overly extreme ride, but I find it to be generally enjoyable provided I don't have to wait more than 15-20mins for it (which is rare due to the aforementioned awful ops/capacity). Other than that, I generally agree with the rest of your review. SFOG is a quiet gem with a lot of really great rides. My personal thoughts on SFOG's ride collection: Goliath: top-3 B&M hyper (w/ Mako & Diamondback) MindBender: best steel coaster built before 1980 (if not 1990) Twisted Cyclone: best RMC (IMHO, even though I know most people are drinking the Steel Vengeance Kool-Aid) GA Scorcher: top-2 Stand-Up (w/ Riddler's Revenge at SFMM) Batman: an excellent cloned model that holds its own with the best of the inverts DDD: best Eurofighter Blue Hawk: best Vekoma sit-down looper (& in the convo w/ TN Tornado, which is my favorite Arrow looper) Superman: best US flying coaster (has the terrain interactions the other clones lack; Tatsu just floats about aimlessly above the trees; Manta is good but I think Superman edges it out) GASM: can go die in a fire. the most boring wooden coaster I've ridden outside of CGA's Grizzly. No airtime. No laterals. No 'classic nostalgia'. Just pointlessness. Mine Train: meh. Justice League: I've had worse luck on this one than any of the others, and it doesn't have an externally-accessible single rider line, which sucks Joker: best family coaster I've seen at a SF park Acrophobia: very good drop tower (if you can get over the uncomfortable seating position) Monster Mansion: stay out of the marsh. STAY OUT OF THE MARSH!! OH NOOOOOO!!!!!!!!
  15. I think theft from bins is probably much worse when you have one giant place where an entire train's loose articles go and a mob of people trying to drop off their loose articles to board colliding with a giant mob of people trying to pick up their loose articles to exit. This is also probably a huge contributor to the 'bins ruin ops' argument. I think that systems where there are small bins dedicated for each row right next to the train help with both things (thinking of the coasters at SWO). The people exiting grab their stuff as they walk out before boarding riders even get there, and the risk of theft drops because you a) have fewer people walking by any given bin of stuff & b) make it harder to hide in a giant throng of people. If you coupled this with a well-staffed platform, my guess is potential thieves wouldn't want to risk it. A guest should never have to get through the gates, cross through the train, walk 2/3 of the length of the train to even get to where the bins are, fight through a throng of exiting riders, drop off their stuff, walk all the way back to their seat, and then start trying to get secured. This is exacerbated when the rides have seatbelts + lapbars and the park requires checking all the seatbelts before lowering lapbars, since the person who often has to walk the farthest to drop off their stuff is usually in the front or back row, which is also often where the ops start checking from, which means they can't even begin checking restraints till that worst-case scenario guest gets all their stuff in the bin. And heaven help everyone if they have something still on them that needs to be secured (hat, glasses, etc.) but the op won't take and makes the guest go put away themselves. My preferred scenario is lockers before you get in line for larger items, and then small bins right next to each row for anything smaller (hat, sunglasses, water bottle, phone, etc.). I don't really have any issue with systems that have lockers (or a staffed position like for Formula Rossa) at the station where you empty everything out of your pockets and get it secured just before being grouped, and then pick it back up right as you exit, though of course it requires forethought in station and queue design.
  16. Okay. So first, let me thank Garet for all that information and the link to the Koridoor DMZ tours. If I were to do the 7:30 tour on Saturday, I'd be done and back around 3:30, which would leave me the rest of the afternoon/evening to do stuff. How crazy of an idea would it be to plan for this time to do Lotte World? If their current park hours stay consistent till then (what's with everything in Korea only letting you see schedules or book stuff a month out?), then it should be open till 11PM. Would ~6hrs be enough time on a Saturday night to at least hit all the coasters and knock out a handful of other rides? Or would I be setting myself up for failure & disappointment? (The only way I'd do the tower in this plan would be if I got to the park and was able to knock out all the coasters within the first hour or two, which I wouldn't suspect would be doable on a Saturday night, right?) If the above is feasible, then I may consider doing what I'm going to henceforth refer to as my 'aggressive' plan (which would require a lot of prayer and the willingness to suck it up & move on if stuff doesn't work out): Thursday: Arrive. Hustle to my hotel & drop off my stuff. Then hustle down to Everland, arriving around 5ish. (I could probably shave an hour or so off that time if I headed directly to Everland from the airport, but I have no idea what I could do with my luggage, and I don't really know that I'd want that headache.) I'd only have 5 hours at Everland, but as long as I can get a couple laps in on T Express (surely this wouldn't be one of the rides that they'd only have open part of the day?) and do a handful of other attractions, I'll probably be reasonably satisfied. Obviously, I'd love to knock off all the coaster credits, but if I miss out on an old Vekoma/Arrow looper or a couple family coasters, it won't be the end of the world. The animal stuff would be cool, but it would be secondary to the other stuff (and I feel like I read somewhere that one of those rides only operated on the weekends, but I can't find that info again). Of course, I have no issue buying the Q-passes for Safari World & Lost Valley if it makes sense; I'll plan to have one for T Express. Unless T Express is one of the attractions they regularly split shift, this feels like it should be doable to me. Friday: Get up early and take the 6:35 KTX to Singyeongju Station to arrive at 8:40. Hopefully I can pick up a cab there to take me straight to Gyeongju World instead of dealing with an extra hour plus worth of bus rides due to ~40 stops. I don't know if they'll be opening at 8:50 or 9:50 (hoping for the latter so I can be on the first wave entering the park), but I figure I should be able to get a good number of laps in on the B&M's and do some other stuff and be out of there by 2PM. That should let me catch the 3:15 KTX back towards Seoul. But I can get off at Gwangmyeong instead of going all the way to Seoul Station and swing by Seoul Land. It looks like they're open till 9, so I'd only have a few hours in the park, but it'd really just be a credit run, so that's probably okay. There is a 1:05 KTX I could do instead, which would give me a couple more hours at Seoul Land at the expense of Gyeongju World, but I don't think that'd be a great trade-off. Saturday: Do the aforementioned 7:30 DMZ tour, and then spend the afternoon/evening at Lotte World. Sunday: Sleep for a gazillion hours on the plane home. This plan would theoretically tick off all the important bits, though due to the rushing it may make it necessary to skip some attractions or re-rides, and not everything may be operating. I can do a 'lower stress' itinerary, but even then I'd still need to hit two things in a day and skip one of the big things altogether, so I don't know how much better that may be. I'm no stranger to long days and aggressive coastering schedules, but I am a stranger to Korea and how things work there, so please tell me if my idea is dumb and going to go very poorly. Thanks!
  17. So I've had an opportunity present itself to spend a couple of days in South Korea in early October, and I'm trying to figure out what all I can realistically do. I haven't been able to find a ton of information in my initial searches, and I'm hoping I'll be able to get some good suggestions from the fine people of TPR. I'll be landing at ICN around midday on Thursday the 4th, and my flight out leaves early Sunday morning the 7th, so it's not much time. Since this is a quick trip, I'm unfortunately going to have to prioritize things. My main priorities are Lotte World (including the tower) and Everland. I'd really like to do a DMZ tour (especially one of the ones that takes you into the blue buildings where they meet with the North Koreans and you can get a photo op where you're technically standing inside North Korea but you're still inside that building), but I'm not sure if I'll be able to find one that will both be in English and be structured to let one random person (me) tag along instead of bringing my own group. Secondary to that would be some of the other parks near Seoul (like Seoul Land) if time permits, as well as any other reasonable cultural/touristy things that can be fit into the schedule in the evenings if I finish other things early. I don't really have time to make it all the way down to Gyeongju World unless I were to abandon my DMZ tour plans and take a very long full day, and even that feels like it might be a bit of a stretch. I'm concerned about how long I need to budget to spend at Lotte World and Everland. On paper, they don't seem like parks that would command huge chunks of time (especially as I don't do water or spinning rides), but I've seen talk of multi-hour waits for many attractions, so I want to be prepared. There appear to be some kind of line skip passes available at both Lotte World & Everland, but I can't say I fully understand how either of them work or how necessary they'd be. If I can drop my stuff off at my hotel and make it to Lotte World at a reasonable early-afternoon hour Thursday, I'm hoping that will leave me enough time to enjoy the park before closing. They don't appear to post calendar info this far out, but if their current schedule holds true, they'd be open till 10. It also appears that they pick different attractions to not open on weekdays, so there's a chance a big ride like one of the coasters may not open. That would suck and may necessitate paying to swing back by on another day if it's an important enough credit. I've also got a thing for skyscrapers, so I've got to find some time to go check out the Lotte World Tower (Is there any kind of easy access to/from the theme park? Or are they considered completely separate attractions w/ no connection between them?) For Friday/Saturday, I'm not really sure what would need to go where. I haven't yet nailed down a DMZ tour, so that may dictate which day is left for Everland. I assume Saturday would be the worse day to visit Everland, no? I imagine Everland may very well be a full day park simply because of wait times. If it doesn't take me the full day and I end up with some time to spare in the evening (or the evening after my TBD DMZ tour), I may go ahead and try to knock out some other credits like Seoul Land (anywhere else I should try to hit?). If I get farther into this planning process and can't find a good DMZ tour option, I might consider trying to shoehorn in a trip down to Gyeongju World. Any suggestions for that if it becomes an option? I'd almost certainly have to make it a (long) day trip. It seems like a half-day type park, no? Are there other things to see/do in the area if time permits? Any other tips/suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I am still relatively new to international travel, so I imagine this will be quite the adventure. Thanks in advance!
  18. I'm going to be at the park on a Sunday in a couple of weeks and am wondering if I should budget for a Flash Pass. (I'm actually starting the day at Sesame Place (gotta make the most of my SWPP) and expect to be at SFGAdv midday to close.) I have no objections to springing for a Flash Pass if it's needed, but I know some parks tend to be fairly dead on Sundays. Also, if the merge points are too far back or if there are restricted rows (e.g. FP rides only in row 4), I'll probably want to pass unless it's stupid crowded. The rides that are important to me on this trip are Ka, El Toro, Zumanjaro (which has a single rider line, right?), & Nitro. Everything else will be gravy. So how much value do you think I'd get out of a Flash Pass? Also, does Justice League have a single-rider line? I thought all of them did, but the one at SFOG doesn't, so I figure it'd be good to ask. Couple additional questions about Ka & El Toro: I remember hearing at one point about a mythical cut-through path so you don't have to walk all the way around to get to the other ride. Is that a thing that exists and is regularly accessible? Also, is the loose article policy more like SV (no phone but wallet/keys OK if secured) or Universal (absolutely nothing in your pockets no matter how secure)? Do they still allow glasses with a strap? Thanks!
  19. I have no idea what park I was at where I rode one of those (it may have actually been the one at Darien Lake), but it was just great silly fun. This whole area looks to be a great addition to the park!
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