Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, & Gojira!

Part 9: Nagashima Spa Land - is Hakugei Japan's best?
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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby Condor » Tue Dec 17, 2019 9:58 pm

Part 6: Fuji-Q Highland

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There aren’t many parks out there one can attach the label ‘infamous’ too. It feels too sinister and dread-inducing to apply to something like an amusement park. But Fuji-Q Highland is a place of extremes and the summit of its high-points contrasts with the abyss of its lows more so than perhaps any other park. The consensus from enthusiast trip reports and vlogs seems to be that while there’s much to laud this park for, there’s as much or more to bemoan. Here, ‘infamous’ seems somehow appropriate.

Fuji-Q’s infamy is most often chiefly attributed to its ride operations. Going by reputation, the best word to describe them might be ‘glacial.’ As in so slow-moving that it cannot be observed in real time. And then there’s the precedent for kissing your chance to ride anything goodbye in weather moister a fine mist. But lately a different sentiment has begun to emerge out of trips to Fuji-Q. Can it be that things are improving? Is the typical park experience actually getting better?

Well, I don’t want to suggest that my day here exemplifies the new norm, but Fuji-Q Highland was one of the very best days of our entire trip. Wait, who is this heretic trying to give an actual critique of Tokyo Disney while praising Fuji-Q? Allow me to explain.

While we had a great time, not all was well as will become evident. Firstly, the operations are still slow. Even if they have improved some, that doesn’t mean they are now good. However I always assumed a big part of this was due to laziness, general incompetence, or poor training of ride operators. Like at Six Flags Magic Mountain. But this wasn’t the case. All of the employees I saw at Fuji-Q were professional, friendly, and well-trained. The slow dispatches appear to result from hyper-cautious policies handed down by management, some form of regulation, or both. I would even say they were better than at a low-rung American corporate park like Michigan’s Adventure.

Some other thoughts. This park is not as big as you’d think. People half-seriously refer to Nagashima Spa Land as the Cedar Point of Japan and Fuji-Q as the Magic Mountain of Japan. But if we’re using size as our metric, then Fuji-Q is more like the Dorney Park of Japan—if Dorney had any world class coasters and actually received proper additions every now and then.

The weather helped big time. If it had been overcast or had threatened to rain, our experience could have turned out completely different. I can also imagine the park atmosphere taking on a different tone if Mt. Fuji wasn’t looming over it against a bright blue sky all day and you felt boxed in by a fog bank or something.

As others have stated, arriving before opening and planning your use of fast passes is crucial. We managed two rides each on Do-Dodonpa, Eejanaika, and Fujiyama, then one on Takabisha, plus Fuji Airways and the Sky Roller, as well as lunch and some lengthy stops for pictures and video. And this is on a day where the park for all intents and purposes had basically shut down at about 3:40pm. Fujiyama and Eejanaika also have single rider lines which worked out to about the same wait time as a fast pass.

We rode Do-Dodonpa first thing after entry with about a ten minute wait. Then we rode Eejanaika, Fujiyama, and Takabisha with fast passes, then Do-Dodonpa again with a fast pass, and both Eejanaika and Fujiyama again as single riders. Our longest wait was about 30 minutes for Fuji Airways, which in hindsight we would have skipped if we knew more about what time they shut the queue lines down. Had we done that, we could have absolutely single rider lined both Eejanaika and Fujiyama another time.

Yeah, it sucks that you have to be so strategic at this park, but when you look at it on a total cost basis, it’s 1,500 yen per fast pass and we each bought four of them, so that’s 6,000 yen or slightly less than $60.00. For comparison, a gold-level FlashPass for one person at SFMM on an off-season weekday costs $65.00. Granted the FlashPass is still a better value because you can ride the coasters more than once, but given the limited operating hours at Fuji-Q, it’s not a bad deal.

We took a JR Line bus from Tokyo Station, East Exit (known as the Yaesu side). This is a good alternative to taking a bus from Shinjuku Station. I’ve read about the difficulty other TPR members had finding the bus stop at Shinjuku, but at Tokyo Station it was very easy. The ticket office and bus terminals are simple to find and clearly marked. You almost can’t miss them. And Tokyo Station has just as many connections around the city as Shinjuku does, so it shouldn’t be a problem getting there by train no matter where your hotel is located. You’ll want to book the JR bus several days in advance if possible. We booked ours 48 hours ahead and it was already close to sold-out.

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I’m on the bus, minding my own business, reading my Brett Easton Ellis book and----oh my lord, will you look at the snowcap on that stratovolcano!

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Earlier in the trip, I was happy to have seen Mt. Fuji at all, even if it was only out the window of a passing Shinkansen. Never did I expect to see it up close looking like this.

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When you can see Fuji-san this clearly, I think Fujiyama has the best lift hill view of any coaster, bar none.

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Fujiyama looms large over the parking lot and entrance plaza. The other three coasters are newer and get most of the hype nowadays, but the Togo hyper was one of my top coasters to look forward to on the trip. I just knew there was no way I wasn’t going to like it.

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There aren’t enough coasters painted white in America. They look great against a blue sky and always hold up better than whatever combination of orange, blue, pink, and brown the bean counters have chosen this year.

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We were really excited to be here. With perfect weather, Fuji-san watching over us, and a TPR-approved plan to attack the rides, why wouldn’t we be?

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The Fujiyoshida area was the first place we saw Japan’s famous fall leaves changing color. It was still a couple weeks too early to see them in full effect elsewhere. It only has four signature coasters, but Fuji-Q still has a great skyline.

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If you buy a bus transportation and park entry combo-ticket like I did, keep in mind that you still must purchase an additional pass that permits you to go on the rides. I didn’t look closely enough and had to double-back and buy the right ticket as others ahead of me were already entering the park.

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Thankfully it didn’t cost us much time getting to the first coaster. Crowds were light at opening.

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Do-Dodonpa was an easy first pick. All coasters here except Fujiyama have abysmal capacity, but Do-Dodonpa feels like the lowest.

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I missed Hypersonic XLC by a few years, so this would be my first air-launched coaster. I’m no fan of the tame, back and forth, triple-launches we see so often today, so I was pretty amped to feel just how powerful Do-Dodonpa’s launch really was. This ride is the total antithesis of all those triple-launchers.

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The fluffy, fluffy bunny filled with medicine and goo system works great on this ride. Exiting the train on the same side of the platform you board from allows riders to put away loose articles before boarding the train, aiding what would otherwise be an even lower capacity ride.

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I’m usually pretty stoic on roller coasters. I’ll put my hands up for ejector airtime, but I’m not a gregarious rider who waives at everyone and hollers all over the place. But when Do-Dodonpa launched, I let out the biggest audible WOAHHH!!!! I think I’ve ever done on a coaster.

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While I like the big loop on YOLOcoaster slightly more, being able to look out to the side and see a snow-capped Mt. Fuji inverting through a full 360 degrees is an experience I’ll likely never be able to replicate. It was truly surreal.

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I bet I would have loved the airtime murder-hill on the old Dodonpa. However great the hill may have been, the loop we have now is still plenty good and is intense on entry.

Do-Dodonpa
I don’t rank the big one-trick pony coasters like Top Thrill Dragster or Kingda Ka as highly as some do. I’ve always been a purist who prefers a well-rounded layout with narrative flow and pacing. So as awe-inducing as Do-Dodonpa’s sheer acceleration is, by the ride’s very nature it was always going to have a ceiling for me. Is it so impressive that it rises up and shatters that ceiling? No, it doesn’t.

This is a great coaster that should be on every enthusiast’s bucket list. The ferocity of the launch, the lasting sensation of speed, and visceral thrill of the vertical loop are worth any wait no matter how long. But if given a proper 10-12 hour day like one would get at other parks, Do-Dodonpa is not first, second, or even third coaster at this park I’d choose to marathon. Like the big, bad Intamins I’ve compared it to, it still feels like a novelty to me. A really, really, impressive, spinning-back-kick to the chest kind of novelty. That said, I’m giving it a great score. Fuji-Q’s big four is world class and whatever order you wish to rank them is valid. 8.5/10

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Eejanaika was one of three coasters along with Flying Dinosaur and Hakugei I saw as contenders for best in Japan. The first drop is every bit as good as X2’s and then some.

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The last raven turn pulls the heaviest g’s of the whole ride. That’s what surprised me the most about Eejanaika. I did not anticipate it being as intense as it is.

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The short five-car train hurts capacity compared to X2, but it benefits the drop. Superior airtime in front or back.

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The ride’s most disorienting moment. Zero-g-roll with a full seat rotation means floater airtime and a sudden directional change all at once.

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S&S turned what is the only dead moment on X2, its big banked turn, into another moment of blissful insanity on Eejanaika with this swooping overbank. It tips you just a little further towards inverted at the top of it without making a full rotation. It’s subtle, but brilliant.

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I don’t remove my shoes because I have to. I do it out of reverence.

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One train op today… Single rider line and fast pass were crucial.

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There’s a nice burst of airtime coming into the brake run after the second raven turn, then you even fully invert for a second before rocking back into an upright position. S&S took the 4th dimension technology to its fullest extent on every element.

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Where X2 takes its first raven turn entirely in an upright position, Eejanaika does a full inversion. S&S altered the profile of the element to have a brief, straight section where the rotation begins, and a sharpened apex for better airtime.

Eejanaika
If X2 was the prototype, then Eejanaika is the first production model. It shows everywhere you look and touch. It’s taller, faster, smoother, more intense, and makes more effective use of the 4th dimension ride system. I loved every second of it. Some people apparently get beat up on this. Carlos was one of them. But both of my rides on it were a pleasure. It’s not smooth the way an RMC i-box is smooth. It still likes to play hard, but at least in my case it was never once jarring or painful.

In a way, Eejanaika is like a fusion of X2 and Batman: The Ride. X2 is breathtaking and out of control, but it never feels intense in a heavy positive-g sense like Batman does. Eejanaika cranks the out of control sensation up another 50% while adding Batman-like positive forces on top of it. I honestly think it’s the most all-out intense coaster I’ve ever ridden. I wish I could describe Eejanaika more easily without constantly comparing it to its California cousin, but it’s the best way to put the experience into context. There's just no proper analogue for these rides other than contrasting them from each other. So while X2 is a very good coaster and in my opinion the third best coaster at its own park, Eejanaika is flat-out one of the very best coasters I’ve ever ridden. 9.5/10

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There was nothing not to like about Eejanaika for me.

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I still have Dinoconda to ride someday, but I hope we haven’t seen the end of the Arrow-style S&S 4D coasters. Eejanaika took a ride system I was ambivalent about and made it one of my favorites.

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I’m a Pepsi man at heart, but I kind of fell in love with these collectable location Coke bottles I saw around Japan. Got Tokyo and Kyoto ones later to make a set with this one.

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The face the TPR Coca-Cola mafia just made when I said I’m a Pepsi man.

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There’s all kinds of artwork like this in the “village” leading up to Eejanaika. I really want to know the stories behind them.

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As I’ve said, I don’t really like Kirin beer. It's tastes flat and watery. But this billboard almost won me over.

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Just look at it. I’ve read that Mt. Fuji is visible only 20-30% of time, making a day like this with a perfect blue sky and not a cloud to be seen especially rare. There’s something deeply spiritual about Fuji that I’ve never felt with another mountain or geological feature before.

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No matter how many times I may visit Japan in the future, it’s very likely I’ll never see it quite like this again.

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But if luck is on my side, next time, maybe I’ll be able to get a view of it from Hakone or Lake Kawaguchiko.

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"Make sure to properly center the Sky Roller!"

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Fuji-Q has a “mini-Mt. Fuji” in the infield encircled by Do-Dodonpa’s turnaround. It’s well worth it for views of the volcano and the park.

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Proximity to Mt. Fuji on a clear day lends Fuji-Q a much nicer atmosphere than it might otherwise have. Without it, I suspect the park might feel a lot more Six Flags-ish.

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The star flyer is one of several rides we didn’t have time for. The views from it that day would have been spectacular.

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Fuji-Q has lined up cars from two former and one current roller coaster near the front of the park. It’s always nice when parks have a sense of their history.

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Zola 7 looks like it was a high-concept, but low-quality attraction, though I obviously never rode it. It was a Togo-built, shooting dark ride on rails with a short coaster section at the end. There are POVs of it out there if you want to see it in action. It was unfortunately not themed to Toby Jones’ character from Captain America.

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Moonsault Scramble. Trivia darling of coaster enthusiasts worldwide. It was a boomerang-like shuttle coaster with track that apparently reached 259 feet tall, which if accurate, could have made it the world’s first hyper coaster as early as 1983. Video of it shows that trains never reached near its structural peak, much like the “is Superman Escape From Krypton really a giga?” question.

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And a first-gen Fujiyama train, just… because.

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You need to ride near the back to unlock most of Fujiyama’s airtime, and if you do, the descent from this hill is pretty damn good.

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Brake run hairtime!

Fujiyama
Although I said previously that Bandit at Yomiuriland was the Magnum XL-200 of Japan, it might be even more true of Fujiyama. It has all of the size, epic views, old school clunkiness, and love-it-or-hate-it, occasionally brutal airtime that Magnum is known for and then some. This is a Japanese Magnum with a track length greater than Millennium Force. It’s not going to be a coaster for everybody and I can see why some of you may be indifferent to it or even dislike it. I, however, thought Fujiyama was awesome.

I rode once near the front and once near the very back. Up front it was good, but not great, while in the back it became legendary. The first drop has little going for it but its height and a couple of the turnarounds are the long and slow variety more often found on wooden coasters from the 1970s or earlier. Fujiyama is not the kind of coaster that throws something insane at you with every element. It ebbs and flows for a varied sense of pacing the way nearly all coaster used to. This works to its benefit on clear weather days as you really get to soak in the views of its namesake mountain. The camelbacks and sharp directional changes in between the slower moments are where it shines brightest. In the back you get yanked down those hills to great effect with plenty of air. And it gets even better with those crazy, banked bunny hills at the end. They were pure, rough and tumble, ejector airtime fun for me and not painful in the slightest. But I’m also the kind of guy who likes to marathon Skyrush and The Voyage and finds them perfectly re-ridable, so you probably shouldn’t listen to me.

Fujiyama was my second favorite coaster at Fuji-Q and top-four overall in Japan. It’s also my pick for the most underrated coaster in the world. 9/10

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No screaming if you waited in the regular queue, please. That privilege is reserved for priority ticket holders and single riders.

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I had to try Mos Burger for lunch and it was quite good. The girl taking my order kept reminding me that this meal was for two people. She couldn’t believe that I intended to eat it myself.

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While Gerstlauer is not the best manufacturer, I’m a big fan after riding some of their European installations. I was looking forward to Takabisha, but it was a lower priority than the others since I figured I’ll get to ride its clone, Shellraiser, sometime soon.

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We only rode it once so I can’t confidently break the ride down element by element.

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While I like Gerstlauer, I’m not such a big fan of my local one, Hangtime at Knott’s Berry Farm. I had no doubt Takabisha’s steeper drop would be better than Hangtime’s, but by how much?

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I think Takabisha’s mess of track is what a non-enthusiast would draw if you asked them to draw a roller coaster. Either that or something extremely basic like Goliath at La Ronde.

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The “dueling” aspect is fun to watch off-ride, but I didn’t notice it on-ride if it happened at all.

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Two first drops with spectacular views. Takabisha’s drop is indeed superior to Hangtime’s.

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Who else wants a Mt. Fuji alpine coaster? Japan, let’s make it happen! They could call it “Pyroclastic Flow.”

Takabisha
If it had been built as an Infinity Coaster instead of running inferior Eurofighter cars, I think Takabisha would get a lot more recognition as a world-wide bucket list coaster instead of its current status as more of a cool curiosity. I bet if a lot of us returned from a Japan trip having missed out on Eejanaika we’d all be pretty disappointed. Now if the same enthusiasts got to ride Eejanaika but missed Takabisha, the reaction would be more, “Yeah it would have been cool, but I’m not devastated.” I think this does a small disservice to Takabisha, which to me is an excellent coaster held back by a primitive vehicle design. I was trying to decide whether I liked it more than Karacho and it’s a tough call. Takabisha is a more intense, balls-to-the-wall experience, but as an Infinity Coaster, Karacho is so much more comfortable and easier to enjoy. I decided to rank Takabisha one place higher, but I still came away from it feeling that as a Eurofighter, the layout only achieves 80% of its potential.

The tunnel-inversion into the short dip and LSM launch is a great sequence. With only one ride on it, all of the inversions blend together for me. They all hit you quick and with moderate intensity. I feared the holding brake might sever some of the airtime on the beyond-vertical drop, but the thing is just so damn steep you get ejected no matter what. The first half had a noticeable rattle that was absent during the second half. This is a quality coaster I don’t feel I got to properly evaluate. For now I’ll say it’s my second favorite Gerstlauer after Schwur des Karnan. And that’s a good spot to be in. Bring on Shellraiser! 8.5/10

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Tentekomai was my first Gerstlauer Sky Roller. I rode a few of the similar Sky Fly models in Germany and while I liked those a lot, the Sky Roller is now my preference. I totaled 61 spins, good enough for third most of the day.

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Fuji Airways was a nice enough flying theater, but not worth the half-hour wait, especially since we could have managed at least one, maybe two single rider waits for Eejanaika or Fujiyama in that time. The attraction itself was good, but would have been better had it shown more of Japan than strictly Mt. Fuji. It was also a little tough to become immersed into the film having seen Fuji so clearly for ourselves. In fact, it was more obstructed by weather in many of the scenes than it was outside at that very moment. That has to be the ultimate first world problem I have so far experienced—being underwhelmed by a ride film because the subject of it was visible more clearly to the naked eye.

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We got off Fuji Airways with plenty of time left ahead of the 5:00pm closing for re-rides on a few of the coasters. Or so we thought. This photo was taken at 3:30pm, a full 90 minutes ahead of scheduled park closing. An automated spiel played in Japanese and English near the station telling us that Eejanaika was not accepting new riders, that even those presently in line may not get to ride, and to please choose another attraction and enjoy the rest of our day at Fuji-Q Highland.

But no, problem, right? I guess Eejanaika is just the most popular coaster today and reached its “limit” first. We’ll just go back to Fujiyam—what??? The same spiel is playing there too??? What about Do-Do—goddammit. Everything that wasn’t a kiddie ride shut its queue down by 3:40. We were still being encouraged to “please choose another attraction,” even though none were available. I guess at Fuji-Q closing time means, “everyone off the rides and out of the park with employees punching out on the time clock.”

After what had so far been a terrific day, we finally got Fuji-Queued….

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We finally found something else to spend our time on and it was a credit no less. All hail…(big breath)… Rock & Roll Duncan…

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It was now a little after 4:00 and our return bus was not scheduled until 6:15, so we wandered around taking pictures.

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Honestly, we had such a great time at the park earlier on that we weren’t too enraged with how the day ended. I was prepared for my time here to go much, much worse than it did.

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At least the gift shop is still open! Fuji-Q had the best park-specific merchandise of any park we saw. Plenty of t-shirts and gifts with logos of the park and its coasters.

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In hindsight I should have bought both of these.

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Back in Tokyo for—you guessed it—more Godzilla location scouting! This is the Diet Building, the Japanese equivalent to the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington D.C. But I knew it best from…

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The original Godzilla in 1954! This technique is called a matte shot. The miniature of the Diet Building didn’t fall apart correctly while filming, so what you see here is a composite of the actual building on one layer of film with the model and the Godzilla suit on a second layer. Careful use of shadow disguises where the layers meet.

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Also represented under the big Godzilla head in Shinjuku!

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Then in 2003’s Tokyo SOS, MechaGodzilla descends from above to block Godzilla’s path to the Diet.

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But the building gets taken out all the same.

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Tokyo Station—West Exit (Marunouchi Side)—the opposite side from where we took the bus. The east side (Yaesu) looks completely different and has modern architecture done in glass and steel. The west side has the original 1914 architecture from when the station was built.

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In Shin Godzilla (2016), Godzilla is portrayed a little differently. He has frozen in a solid state in the middle of Tokyo Station to let his reactor cool down after expending too much energy and overheating. Here they send explosive-laden Shinkansen at his feet to wake him up before he has fully recharged.

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The Tokyo Station area is a blend of old and new Tokyo.

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Once Godzilla is mobile, they detonate the high rise buildings from the photo above on top of him to pin him down at ground level.

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If Shinjuku Station has soured you on the really big Japanese train stations, give this one a visit. It’s far nicer and easier to find your way inside.

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The dome structures on either end of the station were part of the station when first built. They were destroyed by bombs during World War II and Tokyo Station was rebuilt without them. Then in 2012 the domes were reconstructed and the Marunouchi side was restored to its original appearance.

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Godzilla has collapsed, sparing the south dome, allowing them to pump a coagulant chemical into his mouth that will freeze him permanently.

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Inside the restored south dome.

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Godzilla gets back up, but the coagulant works, freezing him in place, forever immobilized in the middle of Tokyo Station.


Next up… Tokyo DisneySea!

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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby Nrthwnd » Tue Dec 17, 2019 10:41 pm

Fuji-Q Trivia: that mini-Fuji you and others (including myself) have walked up to, is actually part of the original park! I went up it to photograph things from it, back in 1972 when the park was only a few years old! And it's still there, bless it. Great look at all the main coasters there. Looking forward to all the TokyoDisney pix you took. :smile:
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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby SharkTums » Wed Dec 18, 2019 6:45 am

I was really enjoying your TR until you said you were a Pepsi Person! =)

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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby Canobie Coaster » Wed Dec 18, 2019 7:21 am

Excellent report! Those shots with Mt. Fuji are incredible.

Out of curiosity, where are the single rider lines at Fuji-Q? Are they by the main entrance or do you have to go hunting for them?
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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby PKI Jizzman » Wed Dec 18, 2019 10:00 am

After riding DoDoDonpa and then going straight to Takabisha, I expected the launch to feel like a gentle breeze. Wrong! It had some nice kick to it! Even after riding it 3 times I still can't figure out the layout - everything does kinda blend together like moments on Eejanaika.

Yes! You had the back seat Fujiyama experience some of us had! Yo, it was so good. The back of the train lags behind a little bit going into those transitions which makes it so much better than being thrown straight into them in the front seat.

Incredible pictures, I'm loving this report! You explained Eejanaika so well, too. What an intense, scary ride.
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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby chickenbowl » Wed Dec 18, 2019 10:13 am

You describe my feelings on these coasters pretty well. Do-Dodonpa's launch is incredible! I can't wait to see how you rank every Japanese coaster overall
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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby bert425 » Wed Dec 18, 2019 10:19 am

great update, with some BEAUTIFUL pics, Condor.
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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby Condor » Wed Dec 18, 2019 11:12 am

Canobie Coaster wrote:Excellent report! Those shots with Mt. Fuji are incredible.

Out of curiosity, where are the single rider lines at Fuji-Q? Are they by the main entrance or do you have to go hunting for them?


The only rides I saw single rider lines for were Eejanaika and Fujiyama. For both of them we went to the main entrances and used the same queue as the priority tickets/fast passes. Maybe they started labeling them just recently? Do-Dodonpa might have had one too, but I'm not certain.

chickenbowl wrote:You describe my feelings on these coasters pretty well. Do-Dodonpa's launch is incredible! I can't wait to see how you rank every Japanese coaster overall


Thanks! I'll do a Japan top 10 and show where they place on other lists at the end.

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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby chickenbowl » Wed Dec 18, 2019 11:16 am

Condor wrote:
Canobie Coaster wrote:Excellent report! Those shots with Mt. Fuji are incredible.

Out of curiosity, where are the single rider lines at Fuji-Q? Are they by the main entrance or do you have to go hunting for them?


The only rides I saw single rider lines for were Eejanaika and Fujiyama. For both of them we went to the main entrances and used the same queue as the priority tickets/fast passes. Maybe they started labeling them just recently? Do-Dodonpa might have had one too, but I'm not certain.


They were definitely not running the single rider line on the crowded summer day I visited (a label on the signs said "no single rider available today"). I think it's based off crowds. Also the skip-the-line passes cost me 2500 yen instead of 1500 yen each on the day I visited.
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Re: Photo TR: Condor's Audacious JAPAN! Coasters, Culture, &

Postby Nrthwnd » Wed Dec 18, 2019 6:08 pm

SharkTums wrote:I was really enjoying your TR until you said you were a Pepsi Person! =)


Well, he did buy the souvenir Fuji-Q COKE bottle, too. ;)
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And I still have my TDR 30th Anny COKE bttle, too!
Not to mention an empty FUJI-Q Water Bottle as well.
Talk is Cheap :idea: Action is Pricele$$

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