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Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:41 am
by jlp94
^ How long have the lines been? Up to 3-4 hours?

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 11:38 am
by prozach626
jlp94 wrote:- The ride is VERY smooth, though maybe it's too smooth


2019 - When not only can rides be criticized for being too rough, but they can finally be criticized for being too smooth. Personally, my only complaint was that the seats are too comfortable.

RollingCoasting wrote:My only gripe with the ride is that you're not allowed to put your hands up on the launch. :?r


It's a liability thing. If you send a thousand riders with their hands up someone is likely to strain a muscle and blame Six Flags.

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 11:55 am
by ilrider
jlp94 wrote:^ How long have the lines been? Up to 3-4 hours?


Worst I heard it got from a manager was 2 hours yesterday for the preview. We waited an hour 15 minutes this morning, but that was because we got in line when the Coke ERT started, well before the ride opened, to be near the front. It was 75 minutes when we left at 1:30 today. Not too bad at all. They are dispatching pretty quickly, and I honestly think this ride is scaring some people away. There were not a lot of young kids in line. My son is 10, but he has been riding everything for years and has no fear.

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 12:51 pm
by Superbatboy
This seems to be a success, wonder how many copy and paste jobs Six Flags will do with this model.

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:34 pm
by southpuddle
As a former TTD ride op, I’ve seen a handful of dislocated shoulders from people who had their hands up on the launch, so I understand. Granted, that’s only a handful out of tens of thousands of times I’ve witnessed it, but this is the reason for the rule, I’m sure.

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:58 pm
by SteVeUrkle
southpuddle wrote:As a former TTD ride op, I’ve seen a handful of dislocated shoulders from people who had their hands up on the launch, so I understand. Granted, that’s only a handful out of tens of thousands of times I’ve witnessed it, but this is the reason for the rule, I’m sure.


I have not yet ridden an air-launched coaster, but undoubtedly the force based on the speed to second ratio means the launch is just as, if not more aggressive than the hydraulic launches. I could understand the parks having that warning just to save their butts if a dislocated shoulder from a rider were to happen.

I'm a pretty tough guy but as I'm getting older injuries suck. I imagine they have that policy just to cover their butts if someone does hurt themselves while riding. I keep my hands down on most launches these days, and honestly it does not affect the ride experience at all.

I still have not seen a response to the question about that little bump after the launch, does it give a pop of air at all?

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 1:59 pm
by prozach626
Superbatboy wrote:This seems to be a success, wonder how many copy and paste jobs Six Flags will do with this model.


It's a pretty big undertaking for a copy/paste ride. It's not like a free-spin. No one has said one word about SeaWorld/Busch having two Skyrocket 2 coasters, but people will undoubtedly complain if this ride were to be copied in just one other SF park.

SteVeUrkle wrote:I still have not seen a response to the question about that little bump after the launch, does it give a pop of air at all?

I'm not sure if these elements do much. My guess is that they seem like a good filler instead of longer stretches of straight track so that that coaster designers can put elements where they want without leaving any lull in the action.

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 2:01 pm
by thrillseeker4552
Superbatboy wrote:This seems to be a success, wonder how many copy and paste jobs Six Flags will do with this model.


There are many parks in the Six Flags chain that could greatly benefit from a ride like Maxx Force (SFOG and SFNE come to mind). Hopefully they would develop custom layouts, but if Six Flags were to clone this ride I personally wouldn't mind at all.

It's also nice to hear the ride is running fairly consistently and efficiently. Given the issues Gale Force and Merlin's Mayhem had, it's nice to see S&S have a major win. I hope the same for Steel Curtain.

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 2:07 pm
by ilrider
SteVeUrkle wrote:
southpuddle wrote:As a former TTD ride op, I’ve seen a handful of dislocated shoulders from people who had their hands up on the launch, so I understand. Granted, that’s only a handful out of tens of thousands of times I’ve witnessed it, but this is the reason for the rule, I’m sure.


I have not yet ridden an air-launched coaster, but undoubtedly the force based on the speed to second ratio means the launch is just as, if not more aggressive than the hydraulic launches. I could understand the parks having that warning just to save their butts if a dislocated shoulder from a rider were to happen.

I'm a pretty tough guy but as I'm getting older injuries suck. I imagine they have that policy just to cover their butts if someone does hurt themselves while riding. I keep my hands down on most launches these days, and honestly it does not affect the ride experience at all.

I still have not seen a response to the question about that little bump after the launch, does it give a pop of air at all?


No, there really is no air on the bump after the launch that I noticed. It is just there for the track to pass under after coming back down from the double inversion. It does create a head chopper effect coming back down.

Re: Six Flags Great America (SFGAm) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 2:28 pm
by ilrider
ilrider wrote:
SteVeUrkle wrote:
southpuddle wrote:As a former TTD ride op, I’ve seen a handful of dislocated shoulders from people who had their hands up on the launch, so I understand. Granted, that’s only a handful out of tens of thousands of times I’ve witnessed it, but this is the reason for the rule, I’m sure.


I have not yet ridden an air-launched coaster, but undoubtedly the force based on the speed to second ratio means the launch is just as, if not more aggressive than the hydraulic launches. I could understand the parks having that warning just to save their butts if a dislocated shoulder from a rider were to happen.

I'm a pretty tough guy but as I'm getting older injuries suck. I imagine they have that policy just to cover their butts if someone does hurt themselves while riding. I keep my hands down on most launches these days, and honestly it does not affect the ride experience at all.

I still have not seen a response to the question about that little bump after the launch, does it give a pop of air at all?


Deleted due to duplicate post.