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Weird Coaster Facts


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I believe that when the magnets are aligned, the magnetic field between them will be strong and the brake will be "on". When the upper magnet slides back the field strength is diminished and there is minimal braking force applied when a train rolls through, i.e. the brakes are "off".

 

In the bottom animation, you can see a wheel cluster pulling forward just before the magnets re-align, presumably meaning the brake had just previously turned "off" to let the train through.

 

I find it a poorly-considered implementation of eddy current braking, but as of yet B&M is yet to solicit my opinion - and their safety record's pretty good - so I'll just keep the details of that to myself.

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I find it a poorly-considered implementation of eddy current braking, but as of yet B&M is yet to solicit my opinion - and their safety record's pretty good - so I'll just keep the details of that to myself.

 

Please share how you came to this conclusion.

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Family Inverted Coaster at Happy Valley Shanghai is the one and only B&M without Traditional Friction Brakes

 

↓ And How the B&M controllable Magnets work

Interesting. I wonder it when they're "off" the braking force really is zero or just lower (as opposed to intamin brakes, for instance, where either the fins or the magnets move completely away from the other part).

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^Mack uses the same exact braking system on their most recent Wild Mouse coasters (or at least on Coast Rider), only mounted vertically. When the train hits them, you definitely feel a force while they are engaged, but once the brakes disengage it feels like the braking force is zero (or negligibly small). I'm thinking that sliding the two magnets apart disrupts the magnetic field and significantly reduces its strength.

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^^^ I don't understand why they have to be actuated. I think the magnets should be fixed in place. Since the magnet brake can't bring the train to a full stop on it's own*, I don't understand why they're placed anywhere where it would ever need to be turned off. Seems backwards to take a mechanism whose arguably greatest design feature is its inherent lack of moving parts, and attach it to a moving mechanism with many modes of failure, thereby nullifying that advantage.

 

This is exactly why SFNE Superman crashed in 2001. In that case, the failure mode when pressure in the system was lost was the "brake-off" state. D'oh!! Now, I'm sure much has gone into ensuring that the failure mode of these systems is the "brake-on" state, but it is still, in my mind, a higher-risk design than could otherwise easily be achieved.

 

* = Braking force goes to 0 as train velocity goes to 0 as per Lenz's law. This makes me question the original fact as stated. What brings the train to a complete stop in the station?

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These kind of actuated brakes are usually placed after a row of permanent magnet fins. See:

 

 

Superman/Bizarro failed because the brake run was very short and was (almost) solely constitued of moveable magnets. Hope Intamin learned their lesson.

 

Retractable magnets make the train go quicker to the station (increasing capacity). Or in the case of a tire-driven mechanism as on the B&M invert, it reduces the effort the tire's motor has to produce to propel the train. The more speed you have, the more powerful the braking force is. Try to propulse a train while being engaged in a magnet..!

 

The train is then stopped by tires in the station in case of the invert.

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A set of permanent magnets in front of the actuated ones certainly does eliminate my concerns. Now I see the rationale behind each element of the system and I do like the actuated magnets and drive tire braking here. Thanks.

 

Okay new weird fact. Not sure about now, but as of five years ago or so, the first drop trim calipers on Hellcat at Clementon were programmed to adjust their clamping force based on how fast the previous run went thru. Too fast => more clamp. Too slow => less clamp. It would start the day with an untrimmed run and then would alternate: extremely trimmed, almost untrimmed, extremely trimmed, almost untrimmed..... all day long.

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If you discount the original Batman, no Six Flags park has a custom B&M invert

 

Batman-the dark knight at SFNE is a custom floorless.

 

I understand that, but my point was all Six Flags inverted B&M coasters are clones of the original Batman or Batman mirrored

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  • 2 months later...

Every coaster in the U.S. that features a beyond vertical drop is located in the eastern time zone, except for one (SpongeBob Squarepants: Rock Bottom Plunge). There are none in the western time zone.

 

EDIT: Excluding non-Eurofighters, but there is Cannibal.

Edited by Blatch
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  • 3 months later...

[quote name="thes

man]

If you discount the original Batman' date=' no Six Flags park has a custom B&M invert[/quote']

 

Batman-the dark knight at SFNE is a custom floorless.

 

You are right, it is a "custom" design. But it is quite similar in almost every way, to Insane Speed that opened one year prior at Janfusun Fancyworld.

 

It's the same layout with a few tweaks, just like Nitro at Adlabs Imagica.

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