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Sexual Orientation


GAcoaster
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What's your orientation?  

2,134 members have voted

  1. 1. What's your orientation?

    • I'm a guy who likes girls
      1225
    • I'm a guy who likes guys
      472
    • I'm a girl who likes guys
      114
    • I'm a girl who likes girls
      17
    • I'm a guy who likes guys and girls
      163
    • I'm a girl who likes girls
      35
    • I haven't figured out what I like yet...
      64
    • Hobosexual (I'm a person who likes hobos)
      22
    • Hoosexual (I'm a person who likes owls)
      46


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People are so stereotypical now. I know some great gay people. Some of the nicest people you'd ever meet.

 

For me, I'm straight as a bat. I score home runs all the time! (Okay, that was a total lie.) It's hard though finding someone (a girl) that likes Roller Coasters in South Dakota though. But it doesn't matter anyway since we don't have any.

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My parent's seem to be OK with it for the most part, but I can tell they don't 100% approve, but I think that will get better over time. I have my bf over at my house alot, and my parents and siblings like him, so thats good.

The thing that bothers me though, is kids in my school seem to have this "if your a gay guy your a girl" view, which isn't true. I don't think you could tell if you looked at me or anything, and I don't "act" gay at all really, except for the fact that me and bf kiss sometimes in the hallway at school..

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^Some people at my school have the same view. I have been asked why I don't wear dresses (yes, dresses) because I am gay. She was dead serious too.

 

I'm also asked some other reasonable questions, yet dumb at the same time. They ask why I'm not a label whore. And I tell them that clothes are clothes. I'm not going to pay $120 for words on a shirt.

 

They seem so confused

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^Hey man, that's a step up from what the gay kids in my high school had to deal with. Most of them were just called derogatory names and ignored.

 

...I don't "act" gay at all really, except for the fact that me and bf kiss sometimes in the hallway at school..

 

Well, that is about the "gayest" thing you can legally do in high school, is it not? I'm not saying that your peers are justified in their comments, but it's hard to argue that you don't act gay if you kiss your boyfriend in the halls. It doesn't matter if it's "sometimes," because high school kids will dwell on anything that they can. Personally, I don't see why kissing a companion in high school is necessary. I never cared to see it, which is why I never did it.

 

Again, I'm not supporting your ignorant classmates because I'm sure they display affection publicly. I just personally don't care for any of it, no matter what your sexuality may be.

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I recently came across this and thought I'd share it. I found it to be quite interesting... a close look inside the 'gay' brain. Anyone read this before?

 

What makes people gay? Biologists may never get a complete answer to that question, but researchers in Sweden have found one more sign that the answer lies in the structure of the brain.

 

Scientists at the Karolinska Institute studied brain scans of 90 gay and straight men and women, and found that the size of the two symmetrical halves of the brains of gay men more closely resembled those of straight women than they did straight men. In heterosexual women, the two halves of the brain are more or less the same size. In heterosexual men, the right hemisphere is slightly larger. Scans of the brains of gay men in the study, however, showed that their hemispheres were relatively symmetrical, like those of straight women, while the brains of homosexual women were asymmetrical like those of straight men. The number of nerves connecting the two sides of the brains of gay men were also more like the number in heterosexual women than in straight men.

 

Just what these brain differences mean is still not clear. Ever since 1991, when Simon LeVay first documented differences in the hypothalamus of gay and straight men, researchers have been struggling to understand what causes these differences to occur. Until now, the brain regions that scientists have come to believe play a role in sexual orientation have been related to either reproduction or sexuality. The Swedish study, however, is the first to find differences in parts of the brain not normally involved in reproduction — the denser network of nerve connections, for example, was found in the amygdala, known as the emotional center of the brain. "The big question has always been, if the brains of gay men are different, or feminized, as earlier research suggests," says Dr. Eric Vilain, professor of human genetics at University of California Los Angeles, "then is it just limited to sexual preference or are there other regions that are gender atypical in gay males? For the first time, in this study it looks like there are regions of the brain not directly involved in sexuality that seem to be feminized in gay males."

 

Vilain, who studies the genetic factors behind sexuality and sexual orientation, notes that it may turn out that the brains of gay men possess only some 'feminized' structures, while retaining some masculine ones, and this is reflected in how they act on their sexuality. "We know from studies that men, regardless of their sexual orientation, retain masculine characteristics when it comes to their sexual behavior," he says. Both gay and straight men, for example, tend to prefer younger partners, in contrast to women, who gravitate toward older partners. Most men are also more likely than women to engage in casual sex, and to be aroused by visual stimuli. "So I expect that some regions of the brain will remain masculine even in gay men," says Vilain. For something as complex as sexual orientation, it's no surprise that everything from genes to gender to environment may play a role in ultimately determining your perfect partner.

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So 20% of the respondents so far are gay men, which, while not overwhelming, confirms the idea that we're overrepresented in the "coaster community." An interesting question is "Why?" Coastering certainly doesn't fit the stereotype of an archetypically queer pursuit.

 

Is it because we're more naturally thrill seekers/risk takers? Or because we're trying to "prove" something? Maybe the fact that we mostly don't have wives and kids to deal with makes extensive riding simpler? (My partner's a coaster fan, too, greatly enhancing my parkgoing, and making it easy to plan trips.) And - with all due respect to sharktums - why the hell are there so few women, straight or not, here? Certainly a higher proportion of riders are female. Is there maybe something about the enthusiast schtick - obsessing over the details of lift hills and helices - that appeals to the teenage boy in us all?

 

I don't think a lot of women would think to find a website/forum such as this.

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I recently came across this and thought I'd share it. I found it to be quite interesting... a close look inside the 'gay' brain. Anyone read this before?

 

What makes people gay? Biologists may never get a complete answer to that question, but researchers in Sweden have found one more sign that the answer lies in the structure of the brain.

 

Scientists at the Karolinska Institute studied brain scans of 90 gay and straight men and women, and found that the size of the two symmetrical halves of the brains of gay men more closely resembled those of straight women than they did straight men. In heterosexual women, the two halves of the brain are more or less the same size. In heterosexual men, the right hemisphere is slightly larger. Scans of the brains of gay men in the study, however, showed that their hemispheres were relatively symmetrical, like those of straight women, while the brains of homosexual women were asymmetrical like those of straight men. The number of nerves connecting the two sides of the brains of gay men were also more like the number in heterosexual women than in straight men.

 

Just what these brain differences mean is still not clear. Ever since 1991, when Simon LeVay first documented differences in the hypothalamus of gay and straight men, researchers have been struggling to understand what causes these differences to occur. Until now, the brain regions that scientists have come to believe play a role in sexual orientation have been related to either reproduction or sexuality. The Swedish study, however, is the first to find differences in parts of the brain not normally involved in reproduction — the denser network of nerve connections, for example, was found in the amygdala, known as the emotional center of the brain. "The big question has always been, if the brains of gay men are different, or feminized, as earlier research suggests," says Dr. Eric Vilain, professor of human genetics at University of California Los Angeles, "then is it just limited to sexual preference or are there other regions that are gender atypical in gay males? For the first time, in this study it looks like there are regions of the brain not directly involved in sexuality that seem to be feminized in gay males."

 

Vilain, who studies the genetic factors behind sexuality and sexual orientation, notes that it may turn out that the brains of gay men possess only some 'feminized' structures, while retaining some masculine ones, and this is reflected in how they act on their sexuality. "We know from studies that men, regardless of their sexual orientation, retain masculine characteristics when it comes to their sexual behavior," he says. Both gay and straight men, for example, tend to prefer younger partners, in contrast to women, who gravitate toward older partners. Most men are also more likely than women to engage in casual sex, and to be aroused by visual stimuli. "So I expect that some regions of the brain will remain masculine even in gay men," says Vilain. For something as complex as sexual orientation, it's no surprise that everything from genes to gender to environment may play a role in ultimately determining your perfect partner.

 

Do you think having part of the brain larger is our gaydar?!?!

I have PERFECT gaydar. I look at someone and know if they are attracted to the same sex. So far I have predicted eight people in my school and have got every single one right. YAY!!! And mind you, these are all closet ones who told a couple friends, friends of whom I know lol.

 

My friend was telling me last night that he went swimming with a friend who told him that he is in love with his best friend, who's straight. I feel bad for him He's closet too. But it's not my business lol.

 

On the subject of gaydar, why is it that we can tell if they are gay or not? I mean, it seems weird that we can tell if someone is attracted to the same sex.

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Do you think having part of the brain larger is our gaydar?!?!

I have PERFECT gaydar. I look at someone and know if they are attracted to the same sex. So far I have predicted eight people in my school and have got every single one right. YAY!!! And mind you, these are all closet ones who told a couple friends, friends of whom I know lol.

 

My friend was telling me last night that he went swimming with a friend who told him that he is in love with his best friend, who's straight. I feel bad for him He's closet too. But it's not my business lol.

 

On the subject of gaydar, why is it that we can tell if they are gay or not? I mean, it seems weird that we can tell if someone is attracted to the same sex.

 

Damn, maybe you can help me, can you tell me if this guy's a flamer.

http://www.myspace.com/68583410

 

I am so totally in love with him, I know I don't have a chance, but I still want to know.

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^^I read in a Psychology magazine how gaydar works. According to a study, it's based on scent. A gay man gives off a chemical in their sweat that other gays can detect through scent, although it's not something you can actually smell, you just sense it. Same thing for lesbians. They said it's built into our systems to guide us in finding mates.

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^^Maybe that's why when I took an online gay-dar test, i got 1 out of 20 I've also noticed that once I developed my gay-dar, not ONCE did I have a crush on a straight guy. If I like them, they ARE gay or bisexual, even if they are closet. Do you happen to have a link to that magazine's website or a similar article? That would be interesting to read.

 

^^^And like I pretty much just implied, I'm not good with "virtual gaydar" lol. I don't think I can help you here. Sorry!! Have a hug ... *hug* But judging by one of the pics on his profile, I think he might have a slight bit of homosexual attraction

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I just want to start by saying I have horrible "gaydar."

 

I also read this very intresting article posted to New York Magazine from last year that goes into some detail about different physical traits between the sexes and the different orientations. It is a long read, but very intresting. Also here's the article about scent based gaydar. And finally, here's a video from 60 minutes based upon one of the studies done mentioned in the first artilce.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHT9RevQV88

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I'm usually able to tell whether or not a guy is gay. For me, it's all about the mannerisms. The way a guy talks and expresses himself gives it away for me instantly. Men (heterosexual and homosexual) tend to have a sub-conscious feeling whether a guy is gay or not. For example, when I first came to the States, none of my female roommates thought that I was gay, just European (which still boggles my mind why they associate European with gay!) but my guy roommates knew straight away even though I don't act 'typically' gay.

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Just to carry on with all the scientific reports, I found this one rather interesting. Homosexuality and Darwinism don't seem to be so contradictory after all.

"Gay Genes" May Be Good for Women

 

By Michael Balter

ScienceNOW Daily News

18 June 2008

As gay couples race to the altar in California this week, scientists may have found an answer to the so-called gay paradox. Studies suggest that homosexuality is at least partly genetic. And although homosexuals have far fewer children than heterosexuals, so-called gay genes apparently survive in the population. A new study bolsters support for an intriguing idea: These same genes may increase fertility in women.

 

Despite some tantalizing leads over the past 2 decades, researchers have yet to isolate any genes directly linked to homosexuality. Nevertheless, a number of studies have shown that male homosexuals have more gay male relatives on their maternal lines than on their paternal lines, leading some scientists to suggest that gay genes might be found on the X chromosome. And in 2004, a team led by evolutionary psychologist Andrea Camperio Ciani of the University of Padua in Italy reported that women related to gay men had more children than women related to heterosexual men. The differences were striking: The mothers of gay men, for example, had an average of 2.7 children, compared with 2.3 children for the mothers of heterosexual men. A similar trend held for maternal aunts.

 

In new work, reported online this week in PLoS ONE, Camperio Ciani and his colleagues used mathematical modeling to see what kinds of genetic scenarios could explain these results. The team looked at more than two dozen possibilities, such as the number of "gay genes" (one or two), how much of a reproductive advantage the genes provided, and whether the genes were located on the X chromosome or other, nonsex (autosomal) chromosomes. The model that best explained the data consisted of two "gay genes," with at least one on the X chromosome. These genes increased the fertility of women but decreased it in men--a phenomenon previously studied in insects and mammals called "sexual antagonism."

 

Camperio Ciani's team suggests that these gay genes may actually increase how attracted both men and women are to men rather than making gay men more "feminine," as some researchers had earlier proposed. Although this is bad for male fertility, it is good for female fertility and allows such genes to survive at low but stable rates in a population, the authors say.

 

Dean Hamer, a behavioral geneticist at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, who pioneered the search for gay genes, calls the study "an elegant mathematical analysis." He adds that the team has come up with a "simple solution" to the Darwinian paradox posed by homosexuality: "What is a 'gay gene' in a man is a 'superstraight gene' in a woman," he says.

 

Now I can say: "I'm gay but at least my mom is superstraight!" *lol*

 

I really don't know about the whole gaydar thing. Thinking of it, of course there are guys where it is totally obvious that they are gay. But I don't think that you necessarily have to be gay yourself to recognize them.

 

The more I know someone, the less I'll be surprised if he tells me he's gay. The first impression is sometimes helpful but not more than a wild guess, imo. And it can fool you. My gaydar didn't do anything when I first met my boyfriend.

 

But probably my gaydar just sucks.

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For example, when I first came to the States, none of my female roommates thought that I was gay, just European (which still boggles my mind why they associate European with gay!)

 

Maybe this is why

Starts at 3:00

http://youtube.com/watch?v=WYHUiBt8Jgo

 

I posted something about this in the random forum. And then I said Europeans are better than Americans anyway. Lol.

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