Jump to content
  TPR Home | Parks | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Instagram 

SeaWorld San Diego (SWSD) Discussion Thread


Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Replies 1.4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Bubbles was a Pilot Whale. She died a few days ago and was estimated to be in her 50's. Despite the name, a pilot whale is actually much more similar to a dolphin than a whale, this is also true of orcas also but it's much more noticeable with pilot whales.

 

 

Very sad news... rest in peace Bubbles.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bubbles was a Pilot Whale. She died a few days ago and was estimated to be in her 50's. Despite the name, a pilot whale is actually much more similar to a dolphin than a whale, this is also true of orcas also but it's much more noticeable with pilot whales.

 

 

Very sad news... rest in peace Bubbles.

They are all ceteceans. There are three kinds of ceteceans, whales, porpoises, and dolphins. Pilot whales, right whale dolphins, false killer whales, melon headed whales, pygmy killer whale, and orcas are all dolphins.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad to hear about Bubbles We used to have this VHS, "A Day at Seaworld" and there was this whole song about Bubbles in it that my family still brings up to this day. It went, "B-b-b-b-Bubbles is her name, blowing lots of Bubbles her favorite game. B-b-b-b-Bubbles is her name, and Bubbles are her favorite game!" She will be missed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

https://seaworldcares.com/en/2016/08/SeaWorld-San-Diego-Breaks-Ground-on-Ocean-Explorer/

 

Today SeaWorld San Diego broke ground on an exciting and much-anticipated new attraction, the Ocean Explorer.

 

“I’m extremely excited about Ocean Explorer and I know our guests, of all ages, are going to love this fun, interactive and educational new area of the park,” said Marilyn Hannes, SeaWorld San Diego’s park president.

 

[fbvideonew]

[/fbvideonew]

 

The Ocean Explorer will debut in 2017 and will “create an expedition of wonder across the seven seas.” A few of the can’t miss features include:

 

Mini submarines, the signature ride of the attraction, will turn visitors into researchers on a mission to collect data and learn how they can help animals.

A series of undersea research bases that will bring visitors eye-to-eye with Giant Pacific octopuses, Japanese spider crabs and Moray eels

And a number of cephalopod themed rides.

 

Be sure to check back for the latest updates as SeaWorld San Diego gets closer to opening the park’s newest encounter in summer 2017.

thumb_ocean_explorer_-_submarine_ride.jpg.05cfffbcd619fc2c41dbdc66f8bb9166.jpg

Edited by jedimaster1227
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a photo of the groundbreaking ceremony. Glad to see Sea World getting something new.

SeaWorld1.thumb.jpg.ab3dafe53952f354a8fec7e99504b5e6.jpg

From left: San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Jerry Sanders, SeaWorld® San

 

Diego Park President Marilyn Hannes, San Diego City Councilmember Lorie Zapf and San Diego Tourism

 

Authority President and CEO Joe Terzi took part in a special groundbreaking ceremony for an exciting

 

new attraction, Ocean Explorer, which is scheduled to debut at SeaWorld® in late spring 2017.

 

Photo credit: Mike Aguilera/SeaWorld® San Diego

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Well we knew Seaworld announced they would end their orca shows and breeding, but now it is officiall illegal in California

 

California has banned SeaWorld’s killer whale breeding program and entertainment shows under a new measure signed by Governor Jerry Brown on Tuesday.

 

The decision follows the park’s promise earlier this year to end its controversial orca shows.

 

Under the new measure, a bill titled SB839, corporations, and individuals are prohibited from breeding killer whales in captivity. Those who break the new law can be fined up to $100,000.

 

The bill’s author, Democratic Assemblyman Richard Bloom from Santa Monica, made an exception for educational institutions who intend on researching and rehabilitating the marine mammals. Mr Bloom celebrated Governor Brown’s decision on Twitter late Tuesday night.

 

“Very pleased to announce that my law protecting #orca from captive breeding in California was signed by @JerryBrownGov today,” he wrote.

 

The company still holds 24 orcas in captivity at parks in California, Texas, and Florida. In a statement, SeaWorld said that the new law is in line with the company's views. They also pointed out that they are legally permitted to capture new whales with the intentions of returning them into the wild.

 

"The bill does allow for SeaWorld to rescue and rehabilitate stranded orcas, with the goal of returning them to the wild, as is the case with all animals we rescue." the company said on its website. "And, if the federal government determines that the orca is not releasable, that animal could stay in SeaWorld’s care.

 

SeaWorld’s attendance has plunged since the documentary Blackfish was released in 2013, which criticized the park’s treatment of its whales. The company’s shares have also dropped more than 62 per cent in the past three years and are down 37 per cent year-to-date.

 

In March, SeaWorld promised to abandon its breeding programs and entertainment performances to focus on educational endeavors. The park’s San Diego branch plans to unveil their first new orca display by 2019.

 

"SeaWorld has been listening and we’re changing,” the company said in a statement. “Society is changing and we’re changing with it. SeaWorld is finding new ways to continue to deliver on our purpose to inspire all our guests to take action to protect wild animals and wild places.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
"The bill does allow for SeaWorld to rescue and rehabilitate stranded orcas, with the goal of returning them to the wild, as is the case with all animals we rescue." the company said on its website. "And, if the federal government determines that the orca is not releasable, that animal could stay in SeaWorld’s care.

 

This is really the direction I see this parks heading in but this is the first time I've seen them actually acknowledge it. They'll always have orcas and honestly I think that's great news.

Link to post
Share on other sites

^Out of genuine curiosity, when was the last time they actually had to rescue an orca?

 

I don't think I've ever heard of an orca being rescued, rehabilitated and released. I remember JJ the baby gray whale down in San Diego that got rehabbed and released, as well as dolphins, pilot whales, turtles, sea lions, etc. Seaworld is definitely really good at rescue and rehabilitation. But an orca? As long as we don't eff up the oceans too much, orcas are very resilient. They beach themselves on purpose to grab seals and scoot back into the ocean. I've heard that it is risky and they can get stranded if they don't calculate it correctly, but if one was found, they might just help it back into the water rather than capture it. I'd really like to know if Seaworld has actually rescued and captured an orca in recent years.

Link to post
Share on other sites
^Out of genuine curiosity, when was the last time they actually had to rescue an orca?

 

I don't think I've ever heard of an orca being rescued, rehabilitated and released. I remember JJ the baby gray whale down in San Diego that got rehabbed and released, as well as dolphins, pilot whales, turtles, sea lions, etc. Seaworld is definitely really good at rescue and rehabilitation. But an orca? As long as we don't eff up the oceans too much, orcas are very resilient. They beach themselves on purpose to grab seals and scoot back into the ocean. I've heard that it is risky and they can get stranded if they don't calculate it correctly, but if one was found, they might just help it back into the water rather than capture it. I'd really like to know if Seaworld has actually rescued and captured an orca in recent years.

 

They certainly haven't rescued one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
^Out of genuine curiosity, when was the last time they actually had to rescue an orca?

 

I don't think I've ever heard of an orca being rescued, rehabilitated and released. I remember JJ the baby gray whale down in San Diego that got rehabbed and released, as well as dolphins, pilot whales, turtles, sea lions, etc. Seaworld is definitely really good at rescue and rehabilitation. But an orca? As long as we don't eff up the oceans too much, orcas are very resilient. They beach themselves on purpose to grab seals and scoot back into the ocean. I've heard that it is risky and they can get stranded if they don't calculate it correctly, but if one was found, they might just help it back into the water rather than capture it. I'd really like to know if Seaworld has actually rescued and captured an orca in recent years.

 

You're entirely correct, but it's probably going to be 50 years (minimum) before this generation is gone so my guess would be that they would shift their focus into rehabilitation or housing non releasable orcas in order to keep them part of the parks. There were certainty some examples of whales that should have been deemed non releasable. Wasn't there an effort to bring Luna (the whale in the Puget Sound who kept trying to interact with humans) to Sea World or a similar park at one point? I'm not speaking with any authority on this but I could see them putting more focus on these types of things down the line, especially because it's a foregone conclusion that humans will continue to treat the ocean like crap, leading to more marine animals that need rehabilitation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do we know if the definition of "Rescue" is strictly limited to the Ocean? I know I have seen lots of whales; while with the TPR on trips, that Sea World could "Rescue". Sea World offers much better habitats and engagement programs for their animals. So, I could see them getting an animal from other parks that want or need to give up their animals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

^You mean land animals like they have at Busch Gardens? Then they would probably go to Busch Gardens.

 

It seems rare that an orca would need rescuing. Even an orphaned calf would probably be cared for in the pod. However, there are lots of other cetaceans that get into trouble. It would actually be really cool if they took care of a gray whale again or a humpback that we could view. Orcas are my favorite, but there are some really endangered other types of whales, dolphins, and porpoises that Seaworld might be able to help.

 

I wonder if California would bend on their rule of "no breeding" if it was for an endangered species of cetacean. Something like that might not even be covered in this bill, which seems to directly apply to orcas.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Do we know if the definition of "Rescue" is strictly limited to the Ocean? I know I have seen lots of whales; while with the TPR on trips, that Sea World could "Rescue". Sea World offers much better habitats and engagement programs for their animals. So, I could see them getting an animal from other parks that want or need to give up their animals.

 

Unless those facilities sold the animals to SeaWorld, it isn't like they can go demanding them from people.

Link to post
Share on other sites

^Yes, I know that...

 

^You mean land animals like they have at Busch Gardens? Then they would probably go to Busch Gardens.

 

It seems rare that an orca would need rescuing. Even an orphaned calf would probably be cared for in the pod. However, there are lots of other cetaceans that get into trouble. It would actually be really cool if they took care of a gray whale again or a humpback that we could view. Orcas are my favorite, but there are some really endangered other types of whales, dolphins, and porpoises that Seaworld might be able to help.

 

I wonder if California would bend on their rule of "no breeding" if it was for an endangered species of cetacean. Something like that might not even be covered in this bill, which seems to directly apply to orcas.

 

 

I was talking about if a facility were to sell an animal or close down entirely, not that Sea World would demand they be given an animal to "Rescue" it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
^Yes, I know that...

 

^You mean land animals like they have at Busch Gardens? Then they would probably go to Busch Gardens.

 

It seems rare that an orca would need rescuing. Even an orphaned calf would probably be cared for in the pod. However, there are lots of other cetaceans that get into trouble. It would actually be really cool if they took care of a gray whale again or a humpback that we could view. Orcas are my favorite, but there are some really endangered other types of whales, dolphins, and porpoises that Seaworld might be able to help.

 

I wonder if California would bend on their rule of "no breeding" if it was for an endangered species of cetacean. Something like that might not even be covered in this bill, which seems to directly apply to orcas.

 

 

I was talking about if a facility were to sell an animal or close down entirely, not that Sea World would demand they be given an animal to "Rescue" it.

I read your post wrong, thought you were talking about other animals besides ocean animals.

 

It wasn't what I'd call a rescue, but SFDK sold/traded their orca to SWSD. (I still miss Shouka ) So I don't see why they couldn't do it again. It would be up to the other park, but SFDK gave Shouka to SeaWorld because of pressure regarding a law that said marine mammals couldn't live alone, and SFDK couldn't get a hold of another orca. If the other park was pressured by Seaworld (or offered enough money), then it does seem likely. However, it would still be a dead end in the long run, as I don't think facilities capture wild orcas anymore.

Link to post
Share on other sites

^Yes, it is still only prolonging the inevitable. Because if Sea World did purchase a recently caught Orca, there would be another outcry. But I think they will slowly move away from the large animal stuff (Orcas, Dolphins, any others?) and become a more traditional theme park.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to say I can't see them doing that, but then I remembered a rumor I heard about Seaworld looking into showcasing animals via state of the art technology. With tech getting more and more amazing each year, and the VR catching on so hot, it probably won't be too long before we could have a super realistic interactive tour of the ocean. It still wouldn't be the same, and Seaworld is such a big part of animal research and rescue, I don't think (and really hope this won't be true) that they will veer completely into a conventional theme-park and no longer have animals. Or if that does happen, it'll probably accompany a large revolution in zoos that would see many other zoos close up shop.

 

Honestly, I can see a time in the not-so-distant future where many species of animals exist only in zoos. Last I heard, the Yangtzee River dolphin was so endangered in the wild that its only hope was repopulating in zoos. Some people that say "survival of the fittest" might not agree with the concept of keeping a species alive solely in zoos, but if that's the only way for a species to survive, I think most people would agree that it's the best scenario for that animal. Busch Gardens and Seaworld do so much for animal conservation that we don't even really see or hear much about, of course they would be a part of one of these types of efforts if they can.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Honestly, I can see a time in the not-so-distant future where many species of animals exist only in zoos. Last I heard, the Yangtzee River dolphin was so endangered in the wild that its only hope was repopulating in zoos. Some people that say "survival of the fittest" might not agree with the concept of keeping a species alive solely in zoos, but if that's the only way for a species to survive, I think most people would agree that it's the best scenario for that animal. Busch Gardens and Seaworld do so much for animal conservation that we don't even really see or hear much about, of course they would be a part of one of these types of efforts if they can.

 

Agreed 100%, and sadly it's already happening. Great Adventure for example is one of the only places in the world where you can see scimitar horned oryx, a species that's completely extinct in the wild. We're absolutely heading towards more and more species being extinct in the wild, making zoos, safari parks and aquariums even more important than they already are and Sea World / Busch are some of the best in the business with amazing, unappreciated conservation efforts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use https://themeparkreview.com/forum/topic/116-terms-of-service-please-read/