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I was at SeaWorld saturday and could have sat in the viewing area for hours just watching the orcas swim and play, dind't even feel the need to watch the show.

 

If you need the orcas to pushing humans in the water to be entertained, maybe be honest with yourself and admit you really don't care much about them?

 

I don't think that's entirely true, I meant I could have sat and watched them swim all day and dind't feel the need to see the One Ocean show becuase I'm not a huge fan of it, but the old Believe show that included the interaction was one of the best live shows I've ever seen in a theme park, it was spectacular.

 

There's no doubt that it is a spectacle, but if you're really interested in seeing the animals and care about their well being, do you need to see someone flying 30 ft in the air?

 

I'm not sure what me as a guest enjoying the trainer interaction aspect of the show has to do with the animal's personal well being, but again It was pretty cool......

 

Back to Seaworld and it's increasing competition in sealife. Still don't understand why it didn't developed an aquarium/Sesame Street combo like Sealife/Lego for me to markets. I can think of several places like St. Louis or Nashville where this might work.

 

I don't know a thing about the aquarium industry but I do know that Shamu and killer whales are integrally associated with the SeaWorld brand, so any smaller regional aquarium parks that had the SeaWorld name associated with it would have to have killer whales which may or may not be feasible for a smaller location (size and budget reasons).

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Look, what makes Orcas more special than any other animal in a zoo?

 

There's a number of reasons why they were chosen, but the biggest difference between them and 99.999% of zoo animals in the United States is that orcas perform tricks and most zoos are long since out of the circus act business. Even circuses have had to change; Ringling Bros. is retiring the elephant tricks after years of complaints about their treatment of the animals. A fair amount of those complaints stem from entirely legitimate causes.

 

Are there some people who would like to see all zoological parks closed down? I'm sure. There's a very long, steep slope from "End orca breeding program" to "close all the zoos and end pet ownership".

 

Back to Seaworld and it's increasing competition in sealife. Still don't understand why it didn't developed an aquarium/Sesame Street combo like Sealife/Lego for me to markets. I can think of several places like St. Louis or Nashville where this might work.

 

They were slow to the punch and lack the finances to really gun for this due to being saddled with so much debt from the Blackstone acquisition and spinoff.

 

 

Zoo's are out of the animal show business? Really? There's Sea Lion shows everywhere. Even the Aquarium in Atlanta has a dolphins show which is a bit ironic considering it's relationship with CNN

 

Ringling has morphed into an arena show not much different fron a Disney on Ice production consisting of two to three different versions out on the road at the same time that occasionally come together for a combined show instead of a more traditional circus act. Elephants are large and burdensome not to mention expensive to care for, feed, train and transport. I'm sure its a logistical nightmare as the whole train transporting the animal concept went bye bye. It should come as no surprise to see them ditched as fuel prices surged thus increasing already high costs during a recessionary economic period where the ability to pass that along via tickets prices was impossible. I don't really give the animal rights folks as much credit as they claim on that, it was 90 percent economic but why not squeeze in some perceived good pub as a result. Too many folk buy the whole ban on bull ring nonsense so Ringling relented spin., it's always about the bottom line in a tough environment and then you spin for the most positive outcome that might sell a few more.tickets. SeaWorld will do the same. If they think it will help the parks more than hurt to keep the Orca shows they'll fight to keep them, which they seem to think is the case. The shows seem to still be a big draw for those that go there.

 

SeaWorld need to come up with a hotel concept that includes aquarium views from the room, if a hotel in Germany can surround an elevator with an aquarium, SeaWorld needs Aquarium rooms as a premium lodging experience.

 

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Zoo's are out of the animal show business? Really? There's Sea Lion shows everywhere. Even the Aquarium in Atlanta has a dolphins show which is a bit ironic considering it's relationship with CNN

 

I go to a ton of zoos. A *ton*. I rarely see performing animal shows (maybe 15-20% of them?), and when I do, we're generally discussing a single species of animal like sea lions or dolphins. Most zoos are eschewing those sorts of things in favor of constructing larger and more "realistic" enclosure spaces for their animals. That's been a trend ongoing now for a couple decades. Animals are happier, more likely to breed (which is an income source for zoos, let's be realistic here), and it gives visitors a much more thematically interesting area. The African exhibits at Columbus and Binder Park Zoo, just to name a couple in the midwest, are outstanding and can be put against destination themers for content.

 

Ringling has morphed into an reana show consisting of tow and three different versions that occasionally came together for a combined show instead of a more traditional circus act. Elephants are large and burdensome not to mention expensive to care for, feed, train and transport. It should come as no surprise to see them ditched as fuel prices surged thus increasing already high costs during a recessionary economic period where the ability to pass that along via tickets prices was impossible.

 

Oil prices are now diving below $50 a barrel and I don't see them making the call to reverse that decision. No matter what the "actual cause", I think it's the right thing to do and makes them more of a contemporary product.

 

SeaWorld need to come up with a hotel concept that includes aquarium views from the room, if a hotel in Germany can surround an elevator with an aquarium, SeaWorld needs Aquarium rooms as a premium lodging experience.

 

There's something like this in Sentosa too. I'd love to see it.

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Zoo's are out of the animal show business? Really? There's Sea Lion shows everywhere. Even the Aquarium in Atlanta has a dolphins show which is a bit ironic considering it's relationship with CNN

 

I go to a ton of zoos. A *ton*. I rarely see performing animal shows (maybe 15-20% of them?), and when I do, we're generally discussing a single species of animal like sea lions or dolphins. Most zoos are eschewing those sorts of things in favor of constructing larger and more "realistic" enclosure spaces for their animals. That's been a trend ongoing now for a couple decades. Animals are happier, more likely to breed (which is an income source for zoos, let's be realistic here), and it gives visitors a much more thematically interesting area. The African exhibits at Columbus and Binder Park Zoo, just to name a couple in the midwest, are outstanding and can be put against destination themers for content.

 

Ringling has morphed into an reana show consisting of tow and three different versions that occasionally came together for a combined show instead of a more traditional circus act. Elephants are large and burdensome not to mention expensive to care for, feed, train and transport. It should come as no surprise to see them ditched as fuel prices surged thus increasing already high costs during a recessionary economic period where the ability to pass that along via tickets prices was impossible.

 

Oil prices are now diving below $50 a barrel and I don't see them making the call to reverse that decision. No matter what the "actual cause", I think it's the right thing to do and makes them more of a contemporary product.

 

SeaWorld need to come up with a hotel concept that includes aquarium views from the room, if a hotel in Germany can surround an elevator with an aquarium, SeaWorld needs Aquarium rooms as a premium lodging experience.

 

There's something like this in Sentosa too. I'd love to see it.

 

They have already planned for life without the elephants, life with cheaper fuel(at the moment) doesn't change the increased difficulties on the logistics end for just a few elephants in what was once asically a traveling zoo.

 

Back to zoos, it's out of the operational cost for many zoos to not have any shows of any kind. It is a lot easier to bring out a python to let the kids touch than carry a staff of trainers.for a 15 minute sea lion show but your bigger zoos still do. Folks are still adding nice new areas for Sea Lion shows and so on. Zoos,particularly.are getting more inventive, I recently saw one where the Tigers could cross bridge over the pedestrian pathway that separate two different areas for them.

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Back to zoos, it's out of the operational cost for many zoos to not have any shows of any kind. It is a lot easier to bring out a python to let the kids touch than carry a staff of trainers.for a 15 minute sea lion show but your bigger zoos still do. Folks are still adding nice new areas for Sea Lion shows and so on. Zoos,particularly.are getting more inventive, I recently saw one where the Tigers could cross bridge over the pedestrian pathway that separate two different areas for them.

 

To me, there's a world of difference between doing animal encounters with smaller or docile species versus trained and often unnatural behaviors performed for crowds. Same with advertising feeding times or enrichment item disbursement vs. (as an example) One Ocean. There's no need for reward/punishment type training when you give a tiger a block of ice or a big ball in their enclosure, whereas there most certainly is when you're trying to teach it tricks. But in any case, zoos are moving away from that and we're seeing things that I find much, much more interesting in their place (canopy tours, ziplining, amusement rides, etc).

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Back to zoos, it's out of the operational cost for many zoos to not have any shows of any kind. It is a lot easier to bring out a python to let the kids touch than carry a staff of trainers.for a 15 minute sea lion show but your bigger zoos still do. Folks are still adding nice new areas for Sea Lion shows and so on. Zoos,particularly.are getting more inventive, I recently saw one where the Tigers could cross bridge over the pedestrian pathway that separate two different areas for them.

 

To me, there's a world of difference between doing animal encounters with smaller or docile species versus trained and often unnatural behaviors performed for crowds.

Which behaviors are unnatural? The majority of the "tricks" you speak of in the shows are behaviors wild orcas do too. Zoos still do trained behaviors with other animals but they try to stick to natural behaviors and those necessary for husbandry. Jumping through a hoop isn't natural for a tiger per se but jumping and flipping are pretty natural orca behaviors.

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Back to zoos, it's out of the operational cost for many zoos to not have any shows of any kind. It is a lot easier to bring out a python to let the kids touch than carry a staff of trainers.for a 15 minute sea lion show but your bigger zoos still do. Folks are still adding nice new areas for Sea Lion shows and so on. Zoos,particularly.are getting more inventive, I recently saw one where the Tigers could cross bridge over the pedestrian pathway that separate two different areas for them.

 

To me, there's a world of difference between doing animal encounters with smaller or docile species versus trained and often unnatural behaviors performed for crowds.

 

Which behaviors are unnatural? The majority of the "tricks" you speak of in the shows are behaviors wild orcas do too. Zoos still do trained behaviors with other animals but they try to stick to natural behaviors and those necessary for husbandry. Jumping through a hoop isn't natural for a tiger per se but jumping and flipping are pretty natural orca behaviors.

 

Jumping, sure. Doing synchronized flips? Less so. And yes, zoos do some trained behaviors, but nothing remotely like what you'd see in a circus. No one at an AZA zoo is teaching a bear to ride a unicycle. I think the difference then is pretty obvious.

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From the trainers I have spoken to, a lot of them say that the shows and training sessions are important for the animals and logistically, I agree. They help to mentally stimulate the animals which is obviously important. Some of the more intelligent whales like Takara, I have been told, really enjoy the training process almost like trying to figure out a puzzle.

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http://www.seaworldinvestors.com/news-releases/news-release-details/2015/SeaWorld-Entertainment-Inc-Announces-New-Partnerships-and-Business-Initiatives-During-Investor-and-Analyst-Day-Presentation/default.aspx

 

SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc. (NYSE: SEAS), a leading theme park and entertainment company, held the company's Investor and Analyst Day today. The event was also webcast live via the investor relations section of the company's website.

 

A SeaWorld Animal Rescue-theme ride concept announced in today's SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc. Analyst and Investor presentation.

During the presentation, President and Chief Executive Officer Joel Manby shared with investors and analysts a plan to build on the company's strong business fundamentals by evolving the guest experience to align with consumer preferences for experiences that matter -- to learn more about the natural world, the plight of animals in the wild, along with family entertainment and attractions.

 

The plan includes a new approach to in-park activities as well as greater connection to the company's award winning television programming that highlights SeaWorld Entertainment's world-class veterinary care and animal rescue operations. Other elements of the plan include a more simplified approach to value-based pricing, investment in new attractions, and an ongoing focus on cost control as part of a larger commitment to financial discipline.

 

In addition, Manby announced several new business initiatives, including partnerships with Panasonic and Evans Hotel Group.

 

As a part of a multi-year partnership with Panasonic Enterprises Solution Company, Panasonic will become an Official Technology Partner of SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment and its Parks. Panasonic Enterprises Solution Company provides advanced technology solutions serving sports, entertainment and retail industries.

 

"Panasonic is very pleased to be chosen by SeaWorld Entertainment as their new technology partner," said Jim Doyle, President of Panasonic Enterprise Solutions Company. "There are endless possibilities when it comes to adding technology to update and enhance the guest experience throughout all of the parks. Panasonic looks forward to delivering the most cutting-edge technology solutions to impress and amaze."

 

Manby said after the presentation that a key objective of the Panasonic partnership is to use technology to better connect park guests with animals and the company's 23,000 employees, now known as ambassadors, with the larger goal of inspiring a shift in behavior.

 

"We hope that experiencing animals in our parks moves our guests to a deeper understanding of the plight of all animals – and an increasingly threatened natural environment -- and inspires those guests to help conserve the world we share," Manby said.

 

The company also announced Monday that it has signed a letter of intent with Evans Hotels Group to explore development of a resort hotel on SeaWorld's leased land in San Diego. Evans owns and operates well-known resorts and attractions in San Diego County, including The Lodge at Torrey Pines, Catamaran Resort Hotel and Spa, the Bahia Resort Hotel and the Bahia Belle and William D. Evans sternwheelers. The Evans partnership is part of SeaWorld Entertainment's strategy to look at opportunities and partners to develop resort properties in or near some of its parks.

 

"We are delighted to partner with Panasonic and Evans Hotels, companies that have such well-established reputations for quality and innovation," Manby said. "We are excited to begin deploying Panasonic technology solutions to enhance the guest experience in our parks and to explore resort development opportunities on Mission Bay with Evans Hotels."

 

"Evans Hotels and SeaWorld Entertainment have been pioneers in helping to make Mission Bay the leisure and entertainment destination it is today. Our companies have each served the local community and visitors to San Diego for more than half a century. This project is an exciting opportunity for our iconic brands to join together to create the ultimate resort experience," said Robert H. Gleason, President and CEO of Evans Hotels.

 

SeaWorld Entertainment's management also announced that the Company's Saturday morning family television programs, Sea Rescue and The Wildlife Docs, have been renewed by Litton Entertainment through summer 2018. The award-winning and Emmy-nominated shows are number one in ratings in their respective Saturday morning timeslots on ABC. The shows document the Company's long-standing commitment to assisting wild animals in need – more than 27,000 to date -- and the sophistication of animal husbandry and veterinary care in its zoological parks.

 

"Animal rescue is part of what we have always been and a key way we are different from other theme park companies. These shows are part of a larger strategy and we are looking to transform what guests experience in our parks and what the public learns about us," Manby said. "In developing new experiences in our parks we want guests to explore, to be inspired and, ultimately, to act and we feel our parks are uniquely suited to creating meaningful and fun vacations -- experiences that matter.

 

"The overwhelming majority of adults – nearly 95 percent according to research we have seen -- tell us that they believe that visiting a zoo or aquarium can inspire conservation," Manby said. "We see a growing trend within our core guest demographic that a vacation can and should be more than just fantasy and entertainment. Guests want to know that they're making a difference for the world we share and our parks deliver on that promise."

 

As part of that commitment, Manby announced the company has initiated production on a new orca presentation for its San Diego park. The new experience will engage and inform guests by highlighting more of the species' natural behaviors. The show will include conservation messaging and tips guests can take home with them to make a difference for orcas in the wild. The current show, One Ocean, will run through 2016.

 

Manby also provided investors and analysts details of new attraction concepts and seasonal events, including a SeaWorld Rescue-themed roller coaster and the addition of holiday shows and experiences featuring characters from the Christmas classic, "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer."

 

A replay of the webcast and the related presentation materials will be available beginning at 12 p.m. Eastern Time on November 10, 2015 via the investor relations section of the company's website at http://www.seaworldentertainment.com.

 

- See more at: http://www.seaworldinvestors.com/news-releases/news-release-details/2015/SeaWorld-Entertainment-Inc-Announces-New-Partnerships-and-Business-Initiatives-During-Investor-and-Analyst-Day-Presentation/default.aspx#sthash.TWmmEapr.dpuf

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Edited by jedimaster1227
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Didn't see that coming but I guess with the recent developments legally it shouldn't be a huge surprise. I think asked in the SeaWorld Orlando thread recently that if the BlueWorld project was going to phase out the existing show or be an addition to it, which was a dumb question at the time since the concept art on the previous page showed the stadium in the project, but maybe long term the show isn't part of the plan.

 

If the new killer whale habitat is half as impressive as it looks in the concept art it may be a better attraction than the show ever can be. I know I don't enjoy the new show as much as the old one without the trainers interacting in the water, so if that portion is never coming back might as well move onto to a different type of experience.

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Ethically (IMO) it was the right thing to do, and I think even if you don't necessarily agree with me, it is clear that for the California market it is most certainly an appropriate business measure. Now the obvious question: When do they start moving orcas to Texas? Given Texas' stance on exotic animals, I have to imagine they're looking at it.

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Well this will be sad for me as seeing the orca show and getting soaked was a large part of my childhood, but this kinda seemed inevitable in lieu of all the backlash lately.

 

It's interesting that they're going to reallocate funds for a "new attraction." Coaster?

 

Do you think this means they're shelving Blue World for now too? And if they do, does that mean they won't have to agree to the stipulation that they can no longer breed orcas?

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I don't have an issue if orcas somewhere in the future were to be completely phased out of SeaWorld parks. I enjoy the show, but there are plenty of other awesome things in the sea that SeaWorld can showcase. It will take some adjusting from SeaWorld, but I don't think the survival of SeaWorld depends on orcas. While we aren't excactly there yet, I wouldn't be surprised if that were to be the final outcome.

 

However what I have a HUGE issue with is that a bullshit movie like Blackfish is going to get the credit for it....

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This is probably the best decision that could've been made given the circumstances. I'm all for SeaWorld, and I find the shows fun, but this is a change I can accept. Keeping the orcas around and putting them in a giant marquee exhibit should be good for those that still want to see them up close. Orcas have been a key part of the SeaWorld experience after all, so I'm not sure SeaWorld is ready to phase orcas out completely yet.

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I think it is interesting looking at how this story is being covered by CNN, since they produced Blackfish.

 

Its single-day tickets will be just $21, down from $79.

 

Yup that makes sense, Blackfish has completely destroyed Seaworld so they will only charge $21 for a ticket. At least that is what the article seems to say. At least they point out that CNNFilms produced Blackfish.

 

In reality the ticket is $79 which is $21 cheaper then the average of their competition which the park had listed the average ticket price of the competition at $100.

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This is not a change I can accept. SeaWorld needs to continue to fight. Seems like some people in this thread have been drinking the "Blackfish" kool-aid when you say, "This is a change I can accept".

 

What is going to be the argument? "I demand animals perform shows for me!" I doubt you're gonna get tons of people behind that.

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Do you think this means they're shelving Blue World for now too? And if they do, does that mean they won't have to agree to the stipulation that they can no longer breed orcas?

 

Does anyone know the answer to this? Is the breeding ban simply a stipulation of the Blue World approval that they could ignore assuming they don't move forward with it or are they 2 mutually exclusive things that came out of the same hearing?

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This is not a change I can accept. SeaWorld needs to continue to fight. Seems like some people in this thread have been drinking the "Blackfish" kool-aid when you say, "This is a change I can accept".

Unfortunately this isnt how business works. The market has spoken (whether for better or wose) and Seaworld needs to adapt accordingly based off market demands if they want to survive. The conservation show approach might actually be better and more interesting anyways.

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Can we talk about the attractions coming to the parks? I for once am excited that San Antonio is getting a new coaster and that they are looking into more dark rides, I hope they turn out better than Antarctica. And to finally branch out to hotels, will definitely help out the parks.

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The way the proposed 'law' is written it indicates Orcas can't be bred for entertainment purposes, so, you adjust a few things, call it education, and presto! A better experience for all! I'm sure that wasn't the intent, but that's what the reality will be. So now California 'lawmakers' will have a nice struggle in their efforts to ban only orcas from breeding in captivity. It will now be a much tougher nut to crack now without shutting down all zoos, aquariums, and pet stores.

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This is not a change I can accept. SeaWorld needs to continue to fight. Seems like some people in this thread have been drinking the "Blackfish" kool-aid when you say, "This is a change I can accept".

 

What is going to be the argument? "I demand animals perform shows for me!" I doubt you're gonna get tons of people behind that.

 

Why does it have to be "perform or nothing"? I'm not for elephants performing ridiculous tricks, but I'm all for experiencing elephants at animal kingdom. If they have appropriate tanks, they don't capture any from the wild, and they breed their own simply for observation and education- I see zero wrong in that.

Animals in an incredible (Albiet artificial) environment are great to observe. And the money generated by sea world does a ton of good. Yes, it pays salaries of CEOs and janitors, but also funds the research and rescue facilities that are severely underfunded if it weren't for them.

Sea world going under is bad for sea life, regardless of what brainwashing extremists like PETA say. If orcas bred and raised in captivity are what keep them afloat- I'm all for it. But only in a great environment.

It's not black and white. There is a middle ground. Or we can see 21k employees go unemployed while watching the last handful of orcas die all by themselves. Wait to go peta.

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