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Six Flags Over Texas (SFOT) Discussion Thread

P.. 420: Pirates of Speelunker Cave announced for 2022!

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^with the track work so far along now, who's to say they won't spend the next couple of months beefing up the structure? No doubt there will have to be a few things done to it but I'm betting if they are they aren't focusing on it just yet.

 

I drove by the park today and the first actual overbank has track in it (the second turn after the first drop). It's really tight as it curves over the top. Looks pretty wild!

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I'm not sold on some of the supports either, but I think they'll beef them up once they finish the track. As far as the G-forces, by the looks of it, it will be crazy, but I don't think outside of any extremes. Just pushing the envelope. No part of the ride screams "More intense than Rolling Thunder turn around on El Toro" or more G-force than Titan's helix. If anything, they may be equal to, but I don't see it being a huge issue. The cars look like they were designed to handle a significant uplift force, and the steel track won't wear as easily.

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You know all of this armchair engineering is really kind of silly and pointless. Do you think they'd spend 10 million dollars on a project and casually forget that part of the track won't be able to support the forces? Or that they'd not run dynamic simulations and FEA on the structure and forces experienced by the passenger? I'm sure minor changes are likely, but major re-profiling and trimming? I'll say unlikely, assuming they did all the correct modeling and simulation.

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Anybody here been checking out the IAAPA thread? It has been confirmed by Rocky Mountain themselves that the bolt plates on Giant's track are there to stay.

 

Well, that surely means that any worries that they won't correct the bowing-out on some sections of track is unfounded. If the bolts stay, that car has got to be PRECISELY in the right spot on the rails at all times with very little side-to-side variance.

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Anybody here been checking out the IAAPA thread? It has been confirmed by Rocky Mountain themselves that the bolt plates on Giant's track are there to stay.

 

Well, that surely means that any worries that they won't correct the bowing-out on some sections of track is unfounded. If the bolts stay, that car has got to be PRECISELY in the right spot on the rails at all times with very little side-to-side variance.

 

That's what I said too, in the IAAPA thread - there can't be any tolerance for error. I'm no expert, but I do have some knowledge of roller coaster engineering - I've been nerding out on the subject for years in preparation for a hopeful career in the amusement park industry after I graduate in Mechanical Engineering.

 

But, I am not knowledgeable on Rocky Mountain's system, and so I have no idea how wide the running wheels are. They've most likely already thought of that though.

 

I really want to see some testing soon...

Edited by A.J.
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I would thank that no sound observations could be made from pictures or structures alone. Doubt could be cast (such as in the case of the overbank supports) by one's preconception of what "practical engineering (or application of physics)" should look like. The reality of engineering though, is that the math paints a different, and certainly truer picture. You may think a certain thing looks incongruent with your idea of sound construction, when the pages and pages of calculations at Rocky Mountain engineering are sound, and the structure will be sound accordingly.

 

Such are the dangers of "armchair engineering".

 

(Or it could fall apart and you can laugh at me)

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From the Rocky Mountain guys themselves: The gap between the bolts is much wider than the typical metal running rail wooden coaster wheels run on. Do real wooden coasters fall off the top rails? No! They are doing an amazing job with this project and I can't wait to see the final product!

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^That point right there I think really settles this. Nobody could tell before that there was that much room between those bolts, but if there is than there's no reason to worry.

 

Plus, riding over those bolts would be a smoother ride than riding right off the regular wooden rails...

 

I've actually stated previously in this thread that there appeared to be enough room between the plates to mount a regular steel running rail, it just gets ignored, much like this will. In a month or so, people will be talking about the plates again.

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Do real wooden coasters fall off the top rails? No!

 

Boardwalk Bullet has at least one place in the layout where the wheels are partially on and partially off the edge of the steel rail. Granted, it's between the final brake and the station, but it's there.

 

But Boardwalk Bullet is a true woodie right? It's not a steel coaster like the Texas Giant now is.

 

If you ever look at a steel track, you can see the wheel marks and there is barely any movement.

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^My post was in response to a comment about "real wooden coasters" and that's why I brought up the Boardwalk Bullet. It's also a coaster that I know jakizle is familiar with.

 

As for steel coasters and movement on the rails, the pipe rail system and the trains that run on them are very different than this steel boxbeam system and the wooden coaster-style trains. I see no reason that they couldn't engineer a bit of jitter into the ride to make it feel more like a wood coaster. Otherwise, why not just go with a proven steel system and make it like Gemini?

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^My bad

 

 

As for steel coasters and movement on the rails, the pipe rail system and the trains that run on them are very different than this steel boxbeam system and the wooden coaster-style trains. I see no reason that they couldn't engineer a bit of jitter into the ride to make it feel more like a wood coaster.

 

Hmmmm, I wonder.....

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From the Rocky Mountain guys themselves: The gap between the bolts is much wider than the typical metal running rail wooden coaster wheels run on.

 

Thanks for clearing that up. That's all I was asking about...

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^My bad

 

 

As for steel coasters and movement on the rails, the pipe rail system and the trains that run on them are very different than this steel boxbeam system and the wooden coaster-style trains. I see no reason that they couldn't engineer a bit of jitter into the ride to make it feel more like a wood coaster.

 

Hmmmm, I wonder.....

 

They can talk to Vekoma for ideas.

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^Me too, except there we were chastised for not being "coaster experts"!

 

You weren't being chastised, it was simply brought up that the assumption was the wheel wouldn't fit, or that it would have a super tight tolerance. But if you make the wheel skinnier...then your margin for movement become bigger. And in normal steel coasters, they don't really move around to much on the track because they are able to hold tighter tolerances.

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According to the interview on the IAAPA thread, they want the new Giant to still feel like a wood coaster, only with far less maintenance issues and a consistent ride feel from year to year.

 

So there will still be some "wiggle room" (or "shuffle space", if you prefer) in the interaction between train and track. This is going to be veeeeeeeeeery interesting.

 

ONE MONTH till train testing???? Holy crap! I will head up there on New Year's weekend and try to get some pics. How much excitement would be generated by SFOT if, on the last operating day before winter break, they had YouTube blowing up with videos of testing trains taken by excited park guests?

 

One of the things I was most excited about in the interview, though, was the "topper track". A much less inexpensive solution for problem wood coasters. Hello, Kemah?

 

If Giant turns out as well as they hope, I'm going to be really excited to see what kind of mayhem can be created when designers like Gravity Group or GCI start cranking out designs from scratch with this track system in mind.

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Just to clear all of the speculation up; RMCC has added their newest invention to the new Giant. I'm not quite sure how it works, but they call it "guide wheels" or something of the sort. They say they could make sure the train doesn't move sideways off the track. It seems like a long shot, but I hope this new idea works! It could bode well for people who dislike riding over bolts.

 

I highly doubt any company in their right mind would engineer a coaster to mess up purposely (excluding Intamin in some cases...)

 

^^I am excited to see this start testing too, that first drop should be quite a thriller!

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Well as far as the wheels go, don't the "guide" wheels on the inside of the rails keep it from shuffling? In my wicked perception those wheels should hold the trains in a more true position on top of the rails so as to avoid those nasty bolts. Below is a crappy pic from Wikipedia, but it shows what I am talking about by the guide wheels. If they are somewhat snug against the inside or outside of the rail that the train is running on, there should be no reason for said train to "get out of the groove" and on the bolts.

 

 

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

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