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Dive Machines? What are your thoughts?


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Capacity. By placing an MCBR halfway between the first drop and brake run, allows you to run an additional train. It also helps to control the speed into the following 'cliffhanger'-style drop.

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I'd assume it's to get the most "bang-for-your-buck" out of the second near-vertical drop. The train will just keep loosing momentum while maneuvering more track/elements, so placing the MCBR early on in the circuit allows that second drop to be taller than it would be if the train had to traverse a lot of track.

 

It's also for capacity reasons, as the additional block will allow the operation of more trains, but that's a standard practice on coasters, so I'd imagine the first point is much more valid.

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I'd assume it's to get the most "bang-for-your-buck" out of the second near-vertical drop. The train will just keep loosing momentum while maneuvering more track/elements, so placing the MCBR early on in the circuit allows that second drop to be taller than it would be if the train had to traverse a lot of track.

Two things:

 

1. Yes, I'm sure this is a huge part of it. If you didn't have the midcourse so soon, you'd need a second lift hill to get the train up high enough to have a really awesome 2nd vertical drop. And on a "dive machine" roller coaster, having more than one drop is actually an important element. Just ride a coaster like Oblivion or G5 and it really feels like something is missing.

 

2. Please note: 1561993847_ScreenShot2015-09-09at22_45_54.thumb.png.a3a06c21ae4481590ad3abdd5053546c.png

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Also, when you think about it, most B&M's (if not all?) immediately begin the ride after the lift. On dive coasters, there's a ton of time between when the train clears the lift to when it actually begins the moving at high speed. So in return, it may seem early, but it's due to how much time you spend at the top of the lift.

 

Here's a doubler to show how Raptor compares. They actually both are the same amount of time from when they leave the lift to when they enter the MCBR.

 

http://www.youtubedoubler.com/?video1=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DgiY0WhKpnpI&start1=50&video2=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D-Qt1LutrWnY&start2=51&authorName=

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I'd assume it's to get the most "bang-for-your-buck" out of the second near-vertical drop. The train will just keep loosing momentum while maneuvering more track/elements, so placing the MCBR early on in the circuit allows that second drop to be taller than it would be if the train had to traverse a lot of track.

 

It's also for capacity reasons, as the additional block will allow the operation of more trains, but that's a standard practice on coasters, so I'd imagine the first point is much more valid.

 

I agree that it is for capacity. Robb also makes a good point that having a second vertical drop is important to give a fuller ride experience. On a side note, imagine how forceful the second vertical drop would be if the brakes didn't kick in beforehand.

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Also, when you think about it, most B&M's (if not all?) immediately begin the ride after the lift. On dive coasters, there's a ton of time between when the train clears the lift to when it actually begins the moving at high speed. So in return, it may seem early, but it's due to how much time you spend at the top of the lift.

 

Here's a doubler to show how Raptor compares. They actually both are the same amount of time from when they leave the lift to when they enter the MCBR.

 

http://www.youtubedoubler.com/?video1=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DgiY0WhKpnpI&start1=50&video2=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D-Qt1LutrWnY&start2=51&authorName=

 

I think we have a winner... it seems like it has a lot to do with blocking, Robb is right though it does make for another exciting element.

 

Also I love how I say with great authority that rcoaster10 is right when everything I know about dive coaster construction comes from Rollercoaster Tycoon 2.

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^

Also I love how I say with great authority that rcoaster10 is right when everything I know about dive coaster construction comes from Rollercoaster Tycoon 2.

 

Well then that clearly makes you an engineer!!

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On a side note, imagine how forceful the second vertical drop would be if the brakes didn't kick in beforehand.

 

Oh, still my beating heart! Just the thought of an unbraked drop into another vertical drop makes me excited! Too bad it'd probably be WAY too intense for most of the normal coaster riding public to enjoy (as opposed to my crazy ethusiast self!)

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You'd need at least a little braking. I'm pretty sure going that fast into such a small drop radius would kill you or give you literal ejector . Seriously though, the crest of dive machines' drops is really small to ensure the drop is as long as possible, so braking is a must. But if they braked just enough, you could get some El Toro like airtime theoretically.

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I don't think there's a situation where it can end up being a block brake for multiple train operation unless the final brakes go into a shutdown mode, because the lift takes as long as the rest of the ride. It still may be needed then. Mainly it's for a second dive, the train stops entirely for the first dive after all.

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On a side note, imagine how forceful the second vertical drop would be if the brakes didn't kick in beforehand.

 

Oh, still my beating heart! Just the thought of an unbraked drop into another vertical drop makes me excited! Too bad it'd probably be WAY too intense for most of the normal coaster riding public to enjoy (as opposed to my crazy ethusiast self!)

I'm no engineer, but I'd bet anything that the train itself couldn't handle a radius that small at speeds that quick either.

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Eh, no matter how many different ways I look at it I can't seem to get excited about dive coasters. Doesn't seem like enough ride experience for your wait time. I feel the same about Strata coasters; have ridden them and it definitely was a sensation, but I wouldn't willingly wait 2 hours for a ride with so few elements again.

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Eh, no matter how many different ways I look at it I can't seem to get excited about dive coasters. Doesn't seem like enough ride experience for your wait time. I feel the same about Strata coasters; have ridden them and it definitely was a sensation, but I wouldn't willingly wait 2 hours for a ride with so few elements again.

 

You must have missed this post. (read below)

 

 

Valravn is has the same ride time as Raptor.

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  • 7 months later...

Recently, I visited Busch Gardens Tampa over the weekend, as I live 30 min from it, and have a season pass. I rode all the popular coasters in the park i.e. Kumba, Montu, Cheetah Hunt, and Falcons Fury no problem and enjoyed the thrill as usual. But every time I visit, I cannot shake the feeling of intense fear I have just looking at Sheikra! I have ridden all the coasters in the central Florida region in Seaworld and universal, in total, I have probably ridden all these coasters over 200 times! No other coaster I have ever ridden gives me the same amount of anxiousness as Sheikra. I'd like to think I'm a relatively seasoned rider, and have no problem riding any other coaster, but Sheikra genuinely terrifies me. In my early teen years, I was terrified of roller coasters, and wouldn't ride them until I decided to face my fears on Kraken. Eventually, I got hooked, and the temporary feeling of nervousness was replaced with one of excitement and an adrenaline rush, and I rode every coaster I could strap myself into... until it came time to ride Sheikra. I had all the feelings of a first time rider all over again- I was weak at the knees, my hands were shaking, I was sweating profusely, my speech was stuttered, and I almost got out of line, listening to the rider's screams. The minute I climbed into the seat and locked my restraint, I practically wet my pants on the way up the lift hill. The drop made me so scared that I was convinced I would never ride Sheikra again... And then I got back in line. For some reason after riding Sheikra again and again 5 years later, I still get all the symptoms of a first time Sheirka rider! This video sums up my emotions pretty well

 

My question is what makes dive coasters (particularly Sheikra) so much more intimidating than any other kind of coasters? Is it the placement and theming of the ride? Is it normal to feel like this every time? Am I just too nervous? How do I face my fear of Sheikra? Can any of you relate to this?

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I don't personally feel much of what you're describing, but most of my non-enthusiast friends, when I first show them a dive coaster (often, in my case, the new Valravn) they are very intimidated and in awe of it! I think it's likely the dramatic look of the vertical drop, coupled with the sheer size of the coaster's structure in general. The lift hill, in part because it's so large due to the turn, is an imposing presence on a park's skyline, and the track itself is pretty huge, to accommodate the larger than normal 8, or 10 across trains. As for the ride experience, a rider knows going in, the feeling that going down a steep drop causes from other coasters, so the thought of that feeling being compounded on a straight drop, brings on the butterflies and nervousness that you feel looking at the ride, and waiting to ride it. That's my perspective on why, at least...

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You're suspended at the top of a vertical drop for several seconds before being released. Think about the actual absurdity of that for a moment.

 

I don't think it's that complicated or worth overanalyzing.

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