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So I want to become a ride op at Six Flags Great Adventure. I've heard so many stories about people being ride ops and having fun, and I want to do the same. My gimmick would be giving DC Comics factoids before sending riders off on rides with a DC theme, combining my comic book obsession and roller coaster obsession. I also have autism, so being repetitive is perfect for me.

 

However, due to the whole coronavirus thing, I'm not so sure if GAdv will be open at all this year, let alone hire people. I'm also only seventeen, and I haven't had any experience holding a job before besides working at my local Petco during job coaching class. But I've read so many things about roller coasters that I think I can do it. What do you guys think?

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um... Concentrate more on just getting the job, first. You can figure out what songs to sing and what rides to go on with your power ranger friends at a later time. Seriously though, don't m

Even with today's announcement that most SFGAdv employees will be making $15 an hour, a bus and Uber every workday will add up (unless you're a non-tipping heathen) and severely cut into your earnings

Yeah, I took NickUni. Gonna fill out the job application in May. One problem is that I will NOT ride Shellraiser during breaks, because I am literally TERRIFIED of the 121.5 degree drop (even if it's

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Everybody's got to start somewhere. Theme parks are a great first job. As soon as Six Flags has their hiring fair, apply! Employers aren't going to care as much about your gimmick as they are about reliability. They will want to know if you have reliable transportation and anything else in your schedule that could conflict with work. For an entry level job like this, you're basically going to be convincing them in the interview that you can:

- Show up on time, every time

- Learn the job quickly and correctly

- Follow procedures exactly and consistently

- Ask for help when needed and not be a know-it-all, but also not try to tell them how to run their business either

- Be willing to do anything they ask you to do, no matter how unpleasant, and never say "it's not my job"

 

If you can do those things, you'll gain some great work experience.

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I'd bet anything they'll be doing another one after this Corona panic is over. If not, just show up at the employment center and apply.

 

I also second Andrew's comments to completely refrain from your fangirl behavior during the hiring and training process.

 

Not trying to be a downer, but your autism, depending on how severely affects your behavior, may preclude you from working in the rides department.

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One thing I always warn people of is that while it is a lot of fun, it is not always glamorous. You will work long hours, you will be stuck in position for hours at a time, you will get screamed at, and you will clean up after gross people (including their vomit). And you won’t be paid great for doing it.

 

That being said it is a great way to meet friends and have fun for a summer if you can tolerate that.

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Have you thought of going to work at Cedar Point? They have dorms. It was a great experience for me (back in the early 90s, whew!). 3 summers, including 2 on the still-manual Blue Streak.

 

Six Flags is fun to work at (I also interned with them after 3 summers at CP), but you will get much better skills at a Cedar Fair park. Six Flags was a very relaxed environment, we did what we wanted when we wanted. CP was opposite; had to work hard, learn how to deal with people, healthy communication, etc. Compare the guest experience at the 2 chains, and that explains it. Completely night and day.

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Employers aren't going to care as much about your gimmick as they are about reliability. They will want to know if you have reliable transportation and anything else in your schedule that could conflict with work. For an entry level job like this, you're basically going to be convincing them in the interview that you can:

- Show up on time, every time

 

These are the best words in this thread.

 

You also may have to prove yourself for a season or so doing another job in the park before becoming a ride operator.

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I also have autism, so being repetitive is perfect for me.

 

Also, I'm not trying to be rude or insensitive whatsoever, but don't volunteer this information. Don't lie about it, but it's nothing you need to disclose unless you're asked about it.

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Just apply, you'll get hired.

 

Amusement parks are ALWAYS hiring when in season, literally I doubt there is any park that stops. Turn over is always high and most can never meet their required numbers anyways.

 

I would submit an application online if you haven't already, they will most likely call, interview and give you a tentative start date, maybe even send you paperwork to fill out to be ready to go and start training as soon as they're allowed to let you be on-site. They will want to open as soon as possible.

 

When you turn 18 you can look at working at parks with dorms, like Disney or CP.

 

EDIT: I'll echo what others are saying as a former ride op and one who made it to a supervisor and hired.

-Be ready to work long hours on hot days. Depending on your states labor laws that could be 12-14 hour days, 5-6 days a week.

-You will work in all weather extremes, hot, cold, raining, etc. Depending on attendance or how extreme they may send you home early, but plan on being there.

-People are a**holes to you for doing your job, don't take it personally. People are just miserable.

 

But be friendly, reliable, show up on time, and you'll have a great experience. Working at SFWoA/GL were the best 5 summers of my life. My best friends to this day are fellow ride ops and park employees. You do really meet the best people and make life long relationships. Half of my friends married people they met working at the parks. Some have even gone onto fulltime director level positions within SF and CF. (and they still won't tell me future ride plans!)

 

Just be yourself!

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  • 10 months later...

The only problem is, I live in Demarest, and my parents think GAdv is too far away. Everyone's telling me to get a job at Nickelodeon Universe in East Rutherford, but I'm not working in that unthemed dump and I like Warner Bros. way better than Nick. I could take a bus to Jackson, then an Uber to GAdv. I do have a debit card now thanks to social security.

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Not to mention that you're looking at minimum a 90-120 minute commute both ways from where you live. It's unfortunate, but it just doesn't sound reasonable. Maybe try something closer.

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I actually considered getting hired (decades ago) at Playland(PNE).... as a park cleaner. You know, the person who sweeps up stuff around the park, etc?

And in later years, seeing several such people around the world (thank you TPR Tours), and how they do their stuff (especially the Asian Disney parks staff), I could easily take on the job and add a bit of hospitality to it. The ones I see cleaning up Playland currently, act totally silent. They don't even make eye contact with the gp. They're boring. Which is sad.

They have the possibility of being more interactive with the public who goes there. I could work with that.  And enjoy it! And get paid for it, too!

And taking responsibility as a Ride Op just didn't agree with me, as far as "working in a park", went.

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Yeah, I took NickUni. Gonna fill out the job application in May. One problem is that I will NOT ride Shellraiser during breaks, because I am literally TERRIFIED of the 121.5 degree drop (even if it's less intense than El Toro's) and I DON'T WANT TO GET OVER IT. I would only ride it if Rorie D. Travis (Devon from Power Rangers Beast Morphers, which is a Nick show) were there with me. That's for another topic, though.

I guess I will just have to quote SpongeBob, as it is my only favorite Nick show (well, sometimes Rocko too.) I CAN sing the campfire song over the all call like someone did on The Dark Knight at SFGAdv (while doped up on painkillers)...

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um...

Concentrate more on just getting the job, first. You can figure out what songs to sing and what rides to go on with your power ranger friends at a later time.

Seriously though, don't mention any of this crap in an interview. Talk about being a responsible and friendly hard worker and not what gimmicks you have in mind for dispatches or what rides you will or will not ride on break.

Let us know how it turns out.

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