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Safest/Most reliable drop tower systems


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I don't think there is any major difference between the systems. I don't recall ever hearing about a drop tower having a brake failure, although I might be mistaken. The real danger is in maintenance of the systems, not the systems themselves.

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I wish Intamin 1st Gens were still made. They are freaking amazing!

 

Me too! I want intamin to combine the concept of the first generation drop tower and merge it with the ZacSpin concept. A 200 foot tall vertical lift, that transfers to a holding brake, and then a drop. At the bottom of the drop you level out and rise into a zacspin style layout. A roller coaster with a drop tower experience.

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I wish Intamin 1st Gens were still made. They are freaking amazing!

 

Me too! I want intamin to combine the concept of the first generation drop tower and merge it with the ZacSpin concept. A 200 foot tall vertical lift, that transfers to a holding brake, and then a drop. At the bottom of the drop you level out and rise into a zacspin style layout. A roller coaster with a drop tower experience.

Yes please

 

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I thought pneumatic, like S&S, were held up up by a constant cushion of air so even if the cables failed the carriage wouldn't plummet to the ground.

 

Those pneumatic towers still rely on the cables to somehow connect the cars to the pneumatic system.

 

ARM/Larson towers use large permanent magnets on the cars. So unless something wonky happens to how physics works, they'll always come to a slow crawl before reaching the ground.

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I thought pneumatic, like S&S, were held up up by a constant cushion of air so even if the cables failed the carriage wouldn't plummet to the ground.

 

Those pneumatic towers still rely on the cables to somehow connect the cars to the pneumatic system.

 

ARM/Larson towers use large permanent magnets on the cars. So unless something wonky happens to how physics works, they'll always come to a slow crawl before reaching the ground.

I know Acrophobia uses magnets as brakes, so I imagine Intamin uses magnets on other drop towers as well.

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I thought pneumatic, like S&S, were held up up by a constant cushion of air so even if the cables failed the carriage wouldn't plummet to the ground.

 

Those pneumatic towers still rely on the cables to somehow connect the cars to the pneumatic system.

 

ARM/Larson towers use large permanent magnets on the cars. So unless something wonky happens to how physics works, they'll always come to a slow crawl before reaching the ground.

 

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I thought pneumatic, like S&S, were held up up by a constant cushion of air so even if the cables failed the carriage wouldn't plummet to the ground.

 

Those pneumatic towers still rely on the cables to somehow connect the cars to the pneumatic system.

 

ARM/Larson towers use large permanent magnets on the cars. So unless something wonky happens to how physics works, they'll always come to a slow crawl before reaching the ground.

I know Acrophobia uses magnets as brakes, so I imagine Intamin uses magnets on other drop towers as well.

Yes, all Intamin gen 2 and up towers use magnetic brake except for Phantasialand's and the indoors one at Lotte World.

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I remember reading somewhere that Intamin supplied the magnetic fail-safe brakes to Fabbri for their drop towers. I wonder if Intamin supplies the brakes to other drop tower manufacturers as well?

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I remember reading somewhere that Intamin supplied the magnetic fail-safe brakes to Fabbri for their drop towers. I wonder if Intamin supplies the brakes to other drop tower manufacturers as well?

I read that somewhere too, and I would not be surprised if they did sell them to other companies.

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I remember reading somewhere that Intamin supplied the magnetic fail-safe brakes to Fabbri for their drop towers. I wonder if Intamin supplies the brakes to other drop tower manufacturers as well?

I read that somewhere too, and I would not be surprised if they did sell them to other companies.

 

I just found where I had read that. It was on Fabbri's website.

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Clearly first gen intamin towers. Certainly no overshooting or overheating brake issues to be found on those.

 

On a serious note, I'd say any tower that uses permanent magnetic brakes fitted on the tower. As others have mentioned, unless the laws of physics change, those brakes /will/ stop you before you hit the ground.

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I'd say the Intamin magnetic brakes. Anything that can stop a ride vehicle as heavy as Acrophobia's while falling straight down 200 feet is a win in my book. Still the scariest drop ride I've ever been on and it never stops wowing me. Better than Zumanjaro haha.

I haven't been on Zumanjaro (I was there when it was delayed and supposed to be open) but I agree Acrophobia is surprisingly intense with the standing position, tilt, and the stop at the bottom always feels like it engages too late. Scares the hell out of me every time and none of the other Intamin drop rides scare me (except the first gen, RIP to the one at SFOG, but Demon Drop is alive and well anyways). The Larson ones are great too for smaller drop towers.

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They're all dangerous and you're going to die.

 

Which is why I will never ride a drop tower.

 

it's weird the first drop tower I ever went on is Lex Luthor's drop of Doom at Magic Mountain and i'm scared of heights. While the ride was being lifted to the top of the tower just the wind alone caused the tower to sway. nervous laughter to say the least, but i survived just fine. been on it like at least 4 times now, at least once on both sides.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I thought pneumatic, like S&S, were held up up by a constant cushion of air so even if the cables failed the carriage wouldn't plummet to the ground.

 

Those pneumatic towers still rely on the cables to somehow connect the cars to the pneumatic system.

 

ARM/Larson towers use large permanent magnets on the cars. So unless something wonky happens to how physics works, they'll always come to a slow crawl before reaching the ground.

I know Acrophobia uses magnets as brakes, so I imagine Intamin uses magnets on other drop towers as well.

Yes, all Intamin gen 2 and up towers use magnetic brake except for Phantasialand's and the indoors one at Lotte World.

 

Lotte World's tower is outside now, but putting it near the bigger gyro drop (sadly now with scream shields) does make it very overshadowed and although it is mainly pneumatic it actually has magnetic brakes at the bottom and top in case of emergencies but you are correct in that it doesn't really use them as its main brakes.

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