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Well, I did it that way for a few reasons. I wanted to maintain the character of the original ride, so I turned the first helix into a "lateral buffet" like the Knoebels Twister, and kept the surprise dip at the end. For the second helix, I wanted to focus on strong, sustained positive g's, like the first helix on SNFE's Superman (though I admit an underbank would probably have been better than an overbank there). And then I made the finish completely bonkers to contrast with the sustained forces of the first half.

 

But yeah, I'm perfectly fine with a chain lift, though it wouldn't be as "turbo". Thanks for the review!

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Here is the beautiful engrish translation on that facebook post.

 

In Spring 2019, you will be born as a new coaster in Japan that fused wood and steel. New dimensional hybrid coaster appearance! It is planned to be a great roller coaster, which could not be achieved only by wood, but a twist of rotation (Horizontal Rotation), and the maximum speed and slope of 50 degrees. Enjoy the latest coasters in Japan with wood and steel (Steel).
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At first I thought that a slope of 50 degrees meant that was how steep the lift hill would be, but that's unrealistic. It would be at least 100 meters tall!

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The automatic translations through Facebook are usually pretty wonky, but it left out the characters at the end of the "maximum speed and slope of 50 degrees" in the original Japanese (上回る) that indicate they're pointing out what will be improving with the new version (literally translates as "outweigh"). My best guess with the translation is that the top speed will be increasing and drop will be an additional 50 degrees steeper, but I'm thinking this is a rounded figure to point out the new drop should be near vertical.

 

Definitely not fluent with reading Japanese, but I'm pretty sure that's what it's saying.

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WOW! I'm surprised this wasn't bigger news. I'm like literally drooling right now. Just when I thought rmc made its mark with SV, then I hear about this! And as far as these prediction videos go, I'm sure RMC is going to twist the ever loving f*** out of this ride.

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Japanese people tend to enjoy somewhat milder things than people in America in pretty much all categories. This includes roller coasters. I'm going to guess it will probably have less twists and inversions than people might expect after seeing RMC conversions in America. It will still be a massive improvement. White Cyclone is an awful, brutal ride.

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Japanese people tend to enjoy somewhat milder things than people in America in pretty much all categories. This includes roller coasters.

 

Is that why Dodonpa's launch is so mild? Or how Kawasemi has mild airtime? Or Flying Dinosaur has a mildly forceful layout?

 

Oh wait...

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Japanese people tend to enjoy somewhat milder things than people in America in pretty much all categories. This includes roller coasters.

 

Is that why Dodonpa's launch is so mild? Or how Kawasemi has mild airtime? Or Flying Dinosaur has a mildly forceful layout?

 

Oh wait...

 

Yeah, because three hand selected more extreme coasters are 100% representative of national trends /s. The entire country of Japan has 91 inversions. You can find 89 inversions in three parks in America. Tastes fluctuate between nations, and in Japan tastes are in general more mild than those of Americans.

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^ Is that reason there are sooooo - mannnnny - helixxxxxxxes - and "meandering" in a lot of coasters in Japan?

I have ridden many, that contain these 2 elements. And on and on and on and...

C_07DiavloFromWheel.CentralPark.jpg.ceed4e7beb47ae1091d7f2a546d35d13.jpg

And then we find something like this. Central Park ~ Diavlo. TPR 2007 Japan Tour.

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^ Is that reason there are sooooo - mannnnny - helixxxxxxxes - and "meandering" in a lot of coasters in Japan?

I have ridden many, that contain these 2 elements. And on and on and on and...

It is absolutely the reason. While there are always exceptions, meandering and helixy seems to be the general idea of what coasters should be like in Japan. Maybe White Cyclone will get the full treatment with inversions left and right, but I wouldn't be surprised if NSL asks RMC to tone it down a bit from what we're used to seeing. After riding WC, I suspect the RMC treatment is more about making the ride tolerable than making it overly 'extreme'.

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Japanese people tend to enjoy somewhat milder things than people in America in pretty much all categories. This includes roller coasters.

 

Is that why Dodonpa's launch is so mild? Or how Kawasemi has mild airtime? Or Flying Dinosaur has a mildly forceful layout?

 

Oh wait...

 

Yeah, because three hand selected more extreme coasters are 100% representative of national trends /s. The entire country of Japan has 91 inversions. You can find 89 inversions in three parks in America. Tastes fluctuate between nations, and in Japan tastes are in general more mild than those of Americans.

Or simply not that many modern coasters are built in Japan since Universal and Disney pretty much runs the country’s theme park business. And during the 80s and 90s, Japan has their own manufacturer so what Togo and Meisho were willing to push for represented Japanese general public’s idea of roller coasters. When Meisho can’t do anything and Togo is focusing on more innovative ideas instead of pushing the boundaries of forces like Schwarzkopf, that would result in the general forcefulness of Japanese coasters during that time being lower than the other parts of the world’s. The American and European Coasters that made their way into Japan aren’t tamer or anything.

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Japanese people tend to enjoy somewhat milder things than people in America in pretty much all categories. This includes roller coasters.

 

Is that why Dodonpa's launch is so mild? Or how Kawasemi has mild airtime? Or Flying Dinosaur has a mildly forceful layout?

 

Oh wait...

 

Yeah, because three hand selected more extreme coasters are 100% representative of national trends /s. The entire country of Japan has 91 inversions. You can find 89 inversions in three parks in America. Tastes fluctuate between nations, and in Japan tastes are in general more mild than those of Americans.

 

No, your massive generalizations are ridiculous and stupid. You're generalizing hundreds of millions of people because Japanese coaster companies installed a lot of Jet Coasters 20-30 years ago? Have you even been to Japan?

 

With your logic I can say that the people of Utah tend to love polygamy due to there being 30000 polygamists living in the state. Being a reasonable person and having some basic insight on a culture, I can see that gross generalizations are wrong.

 

Or simply not that many modern coasters are built in Japan since Universal and Disney pretty much runs the country’s theme park business. And during the 80s and 90s, Japan has their own manufacturer so what Togo and Meisho were willing to push for represented Japanese general public’s idea of roller coasters. When Meisho can’t do anything and Togo is focusing on more innovative ideas instead of pushing the boundaries of forces like Schwarzkopf, that would result in the general forcefulness of Japanese coasters during that time being lower than the other parts of the world’s. The American and European Coasters that made their way into Japan aren’t tamer or anything.

 

Thanks for a little insight and nuance into the history of the Japanese theme park market. Also wanted to point out that Togo wasn't only making forceless crap either - Ultra Twisters have some crazy forces/elements, and they made some enormous coasters too (Bandit, Fujiyama, etc)

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Thanks for a little insight and nuance into the history of the Japanese theme park market. Also wanted to point out that Togo wasn't only making forceless crap either - Ultra Twisters have some crazy forces/elements, and they made some enormous coasters too (Bandit, Fujiyama, etc)

Oh yeah absolutely. Fujiyama is my favorite hyper just for how powerful and not perfectly engineered it is. I love it when you can clearly see a company was betting everything on one project and put in their maximum effort with the technology they have available. Much more meaningful than an L shaped out and back hyper.

 

I was trying to say that Togo was doing some really innovative projects, they invented tons of stuff that pushed the whole industry forward. Such an underrated company.

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No, your massive generalizations are ridiculous and stupid. You're generalizing hundreds of millions of people because Japanese coaster companies installed a lot of Jet Coasters 20-30 years ago? Have you even been to Japan?

 

I studied abroad in Japan and I recently spent 3 months there. I've been from the southernmost point to just shy of the northernmost point of the country. I took 2 years of Japanese in America. I have spoken with hundreds of native Japanese people in their own country and have participated in several cultural events (not anime conventions or stupid shit like that). I've heard 2 different native Japanese college professors (one in America, one in Japan) discuss the generally milder tastes of Japanese people in their lectures. I have heard it from other native Japanese people numerous times as well. I have visited amusement parks in both America and Japan with native Japanese friends who have commented on the differences in tastes between the two cultures when it comes to rides. Of course a few of them have mentioned that they like more thrilling rides better, but most don't.

 

There are differences between cultures often involving tastes, perspectives and trends. Understanding these differences actually helps a person to form cultural awareness.

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I mean you should also consider tastes and trends do change over time. I always felt Japan had a much bigger balance in what new rides came out between families vs thrill rides etc. I used to say the same about Korea in my TR's, after T-Express in 2008, almost every new ride in all the parks was ones that the whole family could ride and a lot of media based rides and a few bigger ones got removed with no replacements. The only single high height restriction I saw was a zamperla disko-o and 9 years later, in 2017, E-land added an air-race and a 360 swing and now this year we've seen is a dive coaster and another 360 swing and air race.

 

Do I agree with your opinion... No. Looking at the number of huge rides that have been installed in the last 10-20 years in Japan. But making an argument that going back further that was a trend, I maybe could see it.

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