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Why doesn't RMC provide a grab/handle bar?


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Was just curious if anyone knew as to why RMC doesn't provide a grab/handle bar on their coasters? Their newer trains (Goliath, Medusa, Outlaw Run) don't have anything to hold onto and their older trains (Giant and Iron Rattler) have the little knob on the t-bar that honestly doesn't do anything and IMO is pointless to even have. I can't think of any other coaster that doesn't provide a grab bar in front of you or at least on the restraint (or both). In no way is this a complaint as I always have my hands up, just something I realized and was just more curious as to why they don't provide it.

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Was just curious if anyone knew as to why RMC doesn't provide a grab/handle bar on their coasters? Their newer trains (Goliath, Medusa, Outlaw Run) don't have anything to hold onto and their older trains (Giant and Iron Rattler) have the little knob on the t-bar that honestly doesn't do anything and IMO is pointless to even have. I can't think of any other coaster that doesn't provide a grab bar in front of you or at least on the restraint (or both). In no way is this a complaint as I always have my hands up, just something I realized and was just more curious as to why they don't provide it.

 

 

There is a small strap on the side of Goliath to hold on to. I guess parks realized that people raise their hands more than hold on.

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This may sound really dumb but if you think about it, it could make sense. If you are really tense and grasp onto the restraints on a coaster, you have a better chance of hurting yourself. If anyone has ever seen the movie Due Date, when Ethan gets into the car accident, he is fine, but Robert Downey Jr, gets hurt because he was awake and tensed up before the accident. I know it sounds unrelated and dumb, but maybe manufacturers encourage less grasping of the grab bars.

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I thought that holding onto grab bars was an actual written rule in some parks. It's somewhere for a rider's hands to go instead of reaching outside of the train. I recall employees going on test runs and people on promo shoots saying that they weren't allowed to put their hands up. I guess it depends on the park since it sounds like grab bars are being left out on some rides.

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^Probably, for some rides, that's the case. Like the ones that say: "keep hands inside the car at all times" or something like that. But I guess there are also many where that isn't the case.

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You'll have to ask RMC about that. I really liked Outlaw Run's original hand grips because they were made of real tan leather. While animal rights people probably weren't too keen on that, there is an abundance of leatherwork going on at SDC and it just made the coaster feel like it was handcrafted. At some point, they switched to a black leather, not sure if it was real or imitation (it felt real). This leather felt a lot more durable than the original tan... a likely reason for the switch. When I went to SDC this season, the grips were totally gone, leaving the threading for the screw exposed. Anyone know if they were brought back?

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This may sound really dumb but if you think about it, it could make sense. If you are really tense and grasp onto the restraints on a coaster, you have a better chance of hurting yourself. If anyone has ever seen the movie Due Date, when Ethan gets into the car accident, he is fine, but Robert Downey Jr, gets hurt because he was awake and tensed up before the accident. I know it sounds unrelated and dumb, but maybe manufacturers encourage less grasping of the grab bars.

 

Yes, because I base all my physics and physiology knowledge on Zach Galifianakis movies.

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Since the trains on Lightning Run are very similar to those by RMC (designer was from RMC anyways), I noticed that the conceptualized train didn't have grab handles. Then they eventually added these seemingly flimsy rubber handles that seem more like an aesthetic piece more than something you can truly grab on to for any type of support during the ride. Maybe it's for comfort of mind for some people?

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Part of the reason has to do with why they use the shin restraints - the cars have completely open fronts, so there's no place to have a grab handle to begin with.

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Weren't the trains on NTAG and IRat made by Gerstlauer and not RMC? If so then I would assume that's why the newer rides like Outlaw Run, Goliath, and Medusa are different, since those are actually RMC trains.

Exactly.

 

 

By the way, it's strictly forbidden to put you hands up on any coasters (I once sent an idea to Mack Rides and their engineers actually had a chat about it, but it was impossible because of that rule... Booh.).

 

Yet SFGA made a post on Facebook saying: "Do you dare to put your hands in the air?" (June 4th). But when I noticed them it was actually against their rules and thus a little bit clumsy to promote that, my comment was deleted.

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Weren't the trains on NTAG and IRat made by Gerstlauer and not RMC? If so then I would assume that's why the newer rides like Outlaw Run, Goliath, and Medusa are different, since those are actually RMC trains.

Exactly.

 

 

By the way, it's strictly forbidden to put you hands up on any coasters (I once sent an idea to Mack Rides and their engineers actually had a chat about it, but it was impossible because of that rule... Booh.).

 

Yet SFGA made a post on Facebook saying: "Do you dare to put your hands in the air?" (June 4th). But when I noticed them it was actually against their rules and thus a little bit clumsy to promote that, my comment was deleted.

Hopefully no park will enforce this rule, because let's say you ride an epic Intamin airtime coaster without hands up, it tames the experience a lot, so you could instead stay seated in your couch at home or ride a B&M to have the same experience.

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LOL If a park were to enforce the no hands rule they'd have to kick at least half the coaster riders in the park out. It's just part of any parks "rules" to simply cover their asses if somehow someone does injure themselves from having their hands up. "Well, we told ya not to do it!" The irony is that its true that usually a drunk driver is more likely to survive an accident than a non-drunk driver because, as discussed, a drunk or sleeping person will not tense up. The same physics apply to coaster riding. I personally always seem to have a more pleasant physical experience while riding hands up and as all around loose as possible and you'll be more likely to injure yourself when tensed up/hanging on for dear life.

Edited by boldikus
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This may sound really dumb but if you think about it, it could make sense. If you are really tense and grasp onto the restraints on a coaster, you have a better chance of hurting yourself. If anyone has ever seen the movie Due Date, when Ethan gets into the car accident, he is fine, but Robert Downey Jr, gets hurt because he was awake and tensed up before the accident. I know it sounds unrelated and dumb, but maybe manufacturers encourage less grasping of the grab bars.

 

Yes, because I base all my physics and physiology knowledge on Zach Galifianakis movies.

 

I was just using it as an example. I know people that hold onto coaster restraints too tight especially on wooden coasters and strain their necks or shoulders. The park is trying to make the ride as enjoyable as possible and if people hurt themselves on the ride, they won't ride it anymore.

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The irony is that its true that usually a drunk driver is more likely to survive an accident than a non-drunk driver because, as discussed, a drunk or sleeping person will not tense up. The same physics apply to coaster riding. I personally always seem to have a more pleasant physical experience while riding hands up and as all around loose as possible and you'll be more likely to injure yourself when tensed up/hanging on for dear life.

 

I learned this back when I was 14, I used to be terrified of big drops and figured out riding with your hands up takes away that feeling in your stomach. There's just something about being unrestricted that makes coaster riding so much more enjoyable.

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