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Rich parents skipping lines at Disney!


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When I worked at Rhino Rally back in 2001-2002 our handicap policy was the disabled person and 3 others may ride at once. They also had to wait for the designated "handicap" vehicle. If they had more than 3 people with them, and they all wanted to ride, the group was split, and the "handicap" person had to ride with each group.

 

I am not sure of the whole policy for the coasters, but I do know that at Kumba and Montu, guests boarding from the exit were not allowed in rows 1 or 8.

 

We have the same policy at SWSA and depending on the ride and how many people you can fit in one row, determines how many people can ride with that disable.

 

I also noticed at work how people like to abuse our Ride Admission policy(R.A.P) for disabled guest. Guest services gives a R.A.P paper to the family stating the name of the disabled, his/her disability, Height of the disabled and what ride he/she can bored. I find Families trying to use the R.A.P to skip lines, while that disabled isn't present with them for what ever reason. Its kinda funny when you look at the R.A.P stating that the disabled is 42" inches while the group is claiming that their 60"inch son is the disabled.

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While I don't doubt that this happens, I'm skeptical of the "This is how the 1 percent does Disney" quote...I can't imagine anyone being dumb and/or arrogant enough to utter that offensive line (though, this is America). If this article is true, then I'm guessing that some rich folks are accumulating some bad karma. I mean, to specifically use someone's handicap to cut lines...that's a special kind of low.

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Honestly, this is one of the most difficult issues to take a stance on. On one hand, I always see massive amount of people abusing the system at all park chains. On the other hand, I do believe that truly disabled people deserve special privileges. If you are truly disabled, and you want to cut me in line, that is fine with me.

 

On the other hand, people paying for use of a disabled person is a major low, and eleven people joining a single disabled person does not seem too justifiable, either.

 

If only there was a way to distinguish the actual disabled people from able-bodied people who are faking or piggybacking. This would make this system a lot easier. Faking disability to get to the front of the line is something I consider to be an insult to actual disabled people.

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I can't judge how much truth this article contains...

 

...but for us over the pond it's another colorful news item were we chuckle about the non-existent US health-system and how it drives ill or disabled people to get the money for their doctor's bill. How sad this might be for the people affected...

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A) I've been around and worked for my fair share of the 1%, and there's absolutely no doubt in my mind that this exists in some form. As long as extremely wealthy, morally devoid people can spend money to distance themselves from the 99%, things like this will happen. It's not widespread by any means, but it happens.

 

B) Where's all the hatred towards the other side of the equation? It takes two to tango, and the act of whoring out handicapped services is just as reprehensible in my book.

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See... Movie World had the perfect policy in Australia for disabled guests... If they couldn't use the entrance to a ride they would go to the exit of the ride with someone to accompany them while the rest waited in the queue... then when they got to the front of the line the rest of the party joined them... IMO that's the way it should be for all theme parks... no special queue jumping unless it's a paid thing like Flash Pass!

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Where's all the hatred towards the other side of the equation? It takes two to tango, and the act of whoring out handicapped services is just as reprehensible in my book.

 

Agreed. A disabled person capitalizing on their disability in this way is not exactly on the moral high road. I could see a disabled person having the mindset of "I have been cursed with this unfortunate condition, I may as well make some profit off it". While I can sympathize, renting yourself out to help wealthy people avoid waiting in line is morally ambiguous at best.

 

Take my sister as an example. She had her entire left arm amputated as part of cancer treatment back in 2004. She went to Six Flags Magic Mountain with some friends, and was told by guest relations that she could take advantage of a disabled pass (along with her friends). She chose not to do it, as she thought that would be taking advantage of her disability. Now, she can obviously stand in long lines, as her body is perfectly intact in every other way. However, the juxtaposition of my sister and someone using their disability to make money makes it difficult to approve in any way of this profiteering.

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Over the course of my time at the Disney College Program, I saw a disheartening amount of abuse of GACs.

 

I do think the GAC for Make-A-Wish is acceptable. It gets the Make-A-Wish child and their family immediately to the front of the line.

 

One incident reminded of is when an angry woman screamed at a family of guests using the Make-A-Wish pass. She literally said "What makes them so special that they get to go to the front?" I explained why guests get that particular version of the GAC and she asked "How do I get one of those passes?" I looked at her and said "You don't want to have this pass ma'am." That was heartbreaking.

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^I've heard similar "what's wrong with them" or "they look fine to me" comments. Thing is, we don't really know who has what problems and who is taking advantage of a privilege (I'm speaking from a Six Flags/Cedar Fair point of view; I haven't been to a Disney park in years (but want to get back!))

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I was at Disneyland a couple of weeks ago, the handicapped line for Pirates was HUGE! All the way through the exit corridor and extending past the Blue Bayou entrance. The regular line was only 10 minutes so I don't think those people were saving much time. Unfortunate for the people who have a genuine need though.

 

I guess once MyMagic+ is fully rolled out disabled people will be able to book ride times like everyone else, and then only need to enter via the exit where the regular queue isn't accessible.

 

Pirates has been like that for YEARS. So unnecessary. There are no stairs and the boats aren't pulled off to let GAP people on. The only people who should be using that entrance are people in actual wheelchairs who can't get through the narrow parts of the queue.

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^My parents need to use ECVs to get around Disneyland, and trying to get them on Pirates is always a bit tricky. The exit is often clogged with wheelchairs, ECVs, and strollers.

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Where's all the hatred towards the other side of the equation? It takes two to tango, and the act of whoring out handicapped services is just as reprehensible in my book.

 

Agreed. A disabled person capitalizing on their disability in this way is not exactly on the moral high road. I could see a disabled person having the mindset of "I have been cursed with this unfortunate condition, I may as well make some profit off it". While I can sympathize, renting yourself out to help wealthy people avoid waiting in line is morally ambiguous at best.

 

Take my sister as an example. She had her entire left arm amputated as part of cancer treatment back in 2004. She went to Six Flags Magic Mountain with some friends, and was told by guest relations that she could take advantage of a disabled pass (along with her friends). She chose not to do it, as she thought that would be taking advantage of her disability. Now, she can obviously stand in long lines, as her body is perfectly intact in every other way. However, the juxtaposition of my sister and someone using their disability to make money makes it difficult to approve in any way of this profiteering.

Why are rich 1% saving money anyways? It seems silly for multi millionaires to be saving $1000 a day, while on a 4 day trip.

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Where's all the hatred towards the other side of the equation? It takes two to tango, and the act of whoring out handicapped services is just as reprehensible in my book.

 

Agreed. A disabled person capitalizing on their disability in this way is not exactly on the moral high road. I could see a disabled person having the mindset of "I have been cursed with this unfortunate condition, I may as well make some profit off it". While I can sympathize, renting yourself out to help wealthy people avoid waiting in line is morally ambiguous at best.

 

Take my sister as an example. She had her entire left arm amputated as part of cancer treatment back in 2004. She went to Six Flags Magic Mountain with some friends, and was told by guest relations that she could take advantage of a disabled pass (along with her friends). She chose not to do it, as she thought that would be taking advantage of her disability. Now, she can obviously stand in long lines, as her body is perfectly intact in every other way. However, the juxtaposition of my sister and someone using their disability to make money makes it difficult to approve in any way of this profiteering.

Why are rich 1% saving money anyways? It seems silly for multi millionaires to be saving $1000 a day, while on a 4 day trip.

Um, what? Honestly, what does your point (confusing as it is) have anything to do with the text you quoted?

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Where's all the hatred towards the other side of the equation? It takes two to tango, and the act of whoring out handicapped services is just as reprehensible in my book.

 

Agreed. A disabled person capitalizing on their disability in this way is not exactly on the moral high road. I could see a disabled person having the mindset of "I have been cursed with this unfortunate condition, I may as well make some profit off it". While I can sympathize, renting yourself out to help wealthy people avoid waiting in line is morally ambiguous at best.

 

Take my sister as an example. She had her entire left arm amputated as part of cancer treatment back in 2004. She went to Six Flags Magic Mountain with some friends, and was told by guest relations that she could take advantage of a disabled pass (along with her friends). She chose not to do it, as she thought that would be taking advantage of her disability. Now, she can obviously stand in long lines, as her body is perfectly intact in every other way. However, the juxtaposition of my sister and someone using their disability to make money makes it difficult to approve in any way of this profiteering.

Why are rich 1% saving money anyways? It seems silly for multi millionaires to be saving $1000 a day, while on a 4 day trip.

Um, what? Honestly, what does your point (confusing as it is) have anything to do with the text you quoted?

 

Er, yeah. This whole thread is about rich people spending lots of money to skip lines. Are you referring to them avoiding the more expensive Disney VIP tours?

Edited by cfc
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Where's all the hatred towards the other side of the equation? It takes two to tango, and the act of whoring out handicapped services is just as reprehensible in my book.

 

Agreed. A disabled person capitalizing on their disability in this way is not exactly on the moral high road. I could see a disabled person having the mindset of "I have been cursed with this unfortunate condition, I may as well make some profit off it". While I can sympathize, renting yourself out to help wealthy people avoid waiting in line is morally ambiguous at best.

 

Take my sister as an example. She had her entire left arm amputated as part of cancer treatment back in 2004. She went to Six Flags Magic Mountain with some friends, and was told by guest relations that she could take advantage of a disabled pass (along with her friends). She chose not to do it, as she thought that would be taking advantage of her disability. Now, she can obviously stand in long lines, as her body is perfectly intact in every other way. However, the juxtaposition of my sister and someone using their disability to make money makes it difficult to approve in any way of this profiteering.

Why are rich 1% saving money anyways? It seems silly for multi millionaires to be saving $1000 a day, while on a 4 day trip.

Um, what? Honestly, what does your point (confusing as it is) have anything to do with the text you quoted?

 

Er, yeah. This whole thread is about rich people spending lots of money to skip lines. Are you referring to them avoiding the more expensive Disney VIP tours?

 

I'm glad I'm not the only one who was confused by this post. Some clarification would be nice.

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Where's all the hatred towards the other side of the equation? It takes two to tango, and the act of whoring out handicapped services is just as reprehensible in my book.

 

Agreed. A disabled person capitalizing on their disability in this way is not exactly on the moral high road. I could see a disabled person having the mindset of "I have been cursed with this unfortunate condition, I may as well make some profit off it". While I can sympathize, renting yourself out to help wealthy people avoid waiting in line is morally ambiguous at best.

 

Take my sister as an example. She had her entire left arm amputated as part of cancer treatment back in 2004. She went to Six Flags Magic Mountain with some friends, and was told by guest relations that she could take advantage of a disabled pass (along with her friends). She chose not to do it, as she thought that would be taking advantage of her disability. Now, she can obviously stand in long lines, as her body is perfectly intact in every other way. However, the juxtaposition of my sister and someone using their disability to make money makes it difficult to approve in any way of this profiteering.

Why are rich 1% saving money anyways? It seems silly for multi millionaires to be saving $1000 a day, while on a 4 day trip.

Um, what? Honestly, what does your point (confusing as it is) have anything to do with the text you quoted?

 

Er, yeah. This whole thread is about rich people spending lots of money to skip lines. Are you referring to them avoiding the more expensive Disney VIP tours?

 

I'm glad I'm not the only one who was confused by this post. Some clarification would be nice.

Sorry for the confusion. It's my mistake.

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I think making the wheelchairs or other disabled guest wait just as long as everyone else is the only way to get the abuses to stop. Disney has been good at getting more and more attractions wheelchair accessible. The best is when a guest in a wheelchair is told that there is no wheelchair entrance, and they can just use the main entrance. They look so offended and disgusted (most, not all).

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