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Man without hands not allowed to ride roller coaster


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The park is in a no win situation on this one. If the guy got hurt on the ride he probably would sue because that is what we do here in the States and by not letting him ride they are probably going to get sued anyway!

 

By Andrew Tanielian, NBCDFW.com

 

A North Texas man said Six Flags Over Texas staff told him he couldn't ride the park's roller coasters because he does not have hands.

 

Michael Green said he waited in line for an hour Friday only to be told he could not ride the Texas Giant.

 

"I'm very furious, sir," he said. "This is the first time this has ever happened to me."

 

 

Green, who lost his hands when his home caught fire when he was 15 months old, said he has learned to live without them.

 

Read the original story at NBCDFW.com.

 

"[i can do] everything except tie my shoes. I can cook. I can drive. I can clean. I can go to school. I can write with my hand. I can type on the computer about 35, 40 words per minute," he said.

 

After park staff at the Texas Giant would not allow him on the roller coaster, Green went to guest relations, where he was told that he couldn't ride anything.

 

"I always get stared at a lot, but I never get discriminated -- people telling me that I can't do something when they don't even know what I can do," he said.

 

Green said he tried to explain to park employees that he had been to Six Flags Over Texas dozens of times as a child and rode everything. He also said he told staff that he even climbs walls and zip-lines at camp.

 

"I just tried to make my case and explain what the situation was, and they wouldn't have it at all," he said.

 

A Six Flags Over Texas spokesperson declined speak with NBC 5 on camera. Instead, the representative said in a statement:

 

 

"Our disability policies include ride manufacturers' guidelines and the requirements of the federal American Disabilities Act. Our policies are customized by ride and developed for the safety and well-being of our guests. Our policies and procedures are reviewed and adjusted from time to time to ensure we continue to accommodate the needs of our guests while simultaneously maintaining a safe environment. "

 

Green said all he wants is to ride.

 

"I thought I was normal, and then I get treated like I am not, like I'm an outsider again -- and that's the worst feeling in the world, to feel like an outsider," he said.

 

An attorney for a Texas disability rights group said safety can be a reason not to allow someone to participate but that each case must be judged separately.

 

"State law and federal law require that an individual assessment be done," said Susan Motley, supervising attorney for Disability Rights Texas.

 

Motley questioned whether hands are necessary to ride a roller coaster.

 

"There are plenty of kids who wave their arms in the air and they never hold on, so why it's more of a risk for him to ride it with no hands than children who hold their hands up -- even though that's discouraged -- I don't understand that justification," she said.

 

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"There are plenty of kids who wave their arms in the air and they never hold on, so why it's more of a risk for him to ride it with no hands than children who hold their hands up -- even though that's discouraged -- I don't understand that justification," she said.

 

For the most part, I agree with this - I never hold on, and I do just fine. I guess the only difference is that, if it came down to it, I could hold on in the event of an emergency. Shame he couldn't ride, though, considering that he seems perfectly capable.

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This really is a sticky situation. Unfortunately, even though the park wouldn't allow him to ride, they made the right move. I don't know if the park has all the disability requirements listed on their website, but if not, they should do that. This would prevent them from any issues over guests not being aware of the requirements. Pretty much everyone has a computer, or can go to a library that has one these days. It's a shame to see situations like this.

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"There are plenty of kids who wave their arms in the air and they never hold on, so why it's more of a risk for him to ride it with no hands than children who hold their hands up -- even though that's discouraged -- I don't understand that justification," she said.

 

For the most part, I agree with this - I never hold on, and I do just fine. I guess the only difference is that, if it came down to it, I could hold on in the event of an emergency. Shame he couldn't ride, though, considering that he seems perfectly capable.

 

I agree, but in a sue happy country like the United States, they can't take the chance. If they have documentation from RMC, that says you need your hands to be able to ride NTAG, then the park is absolutely within their rights to refuse.

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I don't specifically remember all of the rider requirements from all of the rides I've worked over the years at different parks but I'm pretty sure that at least one functioning hand was required from almost all of them. The park probably made the right decision.

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Yeah, I agree with the park. Most roller coasters in America require riders to be able to brace themselves with both arms and legs, and that could be difficult without the use of hands.

I don't know if the park has all the disability requirements listed on their website, but if not, they should do that. This would prevent them from any issues over guests not being aware of the requirements.

Rider requirements are also posted at the entrance to every ride. If they're ignored that's not really the park's fault.

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Don't parks have a sort of 3-limb rule to go on rides?

 

I feel sorry for that man not being able to ride anything at the park but, considering the Darien Lake incident, SFOver Texas did the right thing

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I don't know if the park has all the disability requirements listed on their website, but if not, they should do that. This would prevent them from any issues over guests not being aware of the requirements.

Rider requirements are also posted at the entrance to every ride. If they're ignored that's not really the park's fault.

 

Yes, but then the guests would probably put up a fuss that they payed all the money to get into the park, just to find out that they couldn't ride. At least with it being online, the park could defend themselves.

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Don't parks have a sort of 3-limb rule to go on rides?

 

I feel sorry for that man not being able to ride anything at the park but, considering the Darien Lake incident, SFOver Texas did the right thing

 

Usually it's 3 full limbs. Sounds like he's only got 2 full limbs.

 

SFOT was right to do this, you just can't gamble with someone's safety even if the odds of something happening are 1 in a million. Just because the guy really wanted to ride a ride doesn't suddenly make it ok. Good for SFOT sticking to their guns(not that everyone in Texas has guns).

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A North Texas man said Six Flags Over Texas staff told him he couldn't ride the park's roller coasters because he does not have hands.

 

...

 

"[i can do] everything except tie my shoes. I can cook. I can drive. I can clean. I can go to school. I can write with my hand. I can type on the computer about 35, 40 words per minute," he said.

 

 

Huh?

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Don't parks have a sort of 3-limb rule to go on rides?

 

I feel sorry for that man not being able to ride anything at the park but, considering the Darien Lake incident, SFOver Texas did the right thing

 

It can actually vary from ride to ride as it has a lot to do with ride manufacturer policies in addition to park policies. I know Dollywood actually has a column specifically for this in their park guide and the number of limbs required varies throughout their rides. I had never noticed that before this year, so I bet it has to do with the Darien Lake incident.

Edited by ernierocker
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I have never understand the rationale behind the requirement of being able to "grasp". If the train unlocks and you are holding on, you are still getting thrown from a fast moving coaster. If you have GI Joe Kung Fu Super Grip, your arm will be ripped from its socket and you are still getting tossed.

 

 

A North Texas man said Six Flags Over Texas staff told him he couldn't ride the park's roller coasters because he does not have hands.

 

...

 

"[i can do] everything except tie my shoes. I can cook. I can drive. I can clean. I can go to school. I can write with my hand. I can type on the computer about 35, 40 words per minute," he said.

 

 

Huh?

 

 

Why the "Huh"? Humans and the human body are quite adaptable. Through hard work and training people with disabilities can do a lot of amazing tasks.

Edited by larrygator
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^^ I don't think the "huh?" is confusion over an amputee still being able to write. It's over the contradiciton between one sentence stating that the man has NO HANDS, followed by a quote saying that the man can write with his HAND. Does he have a lack of hands or not? Lol. I missed that when I first read it as well.

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I don't really have a problem with him riding, though the clearly posted signs say that he can't, and the fact that he's pulling all this whiney bullcrap is what makes me think that they were right to refuse him. Sounds to me like he's sapping it up for the publicity and the (possible) money. Discrimination? Hardly. It isn't like they refused him entry to the park, or required he use a different restroom or something. It's a shame that the public takes such notice to these stupidities.

 

It'd be like me complaining that I can't get on a ride because I'm a little person, hypothetically. I'm not tall, that's how it is. But I'm not gonna blame the park for discriminating against small people. That'd be totally ridiculous.

 

Most people think of height as the only thing that governs if you can get on a ride, and ignore the others cause they don't apply to them. But if it's clearly stated that you need to have hands to ride, then you need to have hands. There isn't any amount of political whining that changes the regulations set forth. It's not discrimination, it's for your safety. I don't see many midgets suing over discrimination, why is this guy?

Edited by grrt
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^^OK, that makes sense.

 

I think people are also overlooking the fact that he claims to have been riding at SFoT for years and now he suddenly can't ride anything. Did SFoT recently changes the rules, or did they not enforce the rules for years, or has this kid never been to the park before in his life?

Edited by larrygator
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Let's back up a year to Darien Lake. If the double amputee had been denied his ride on RoS, perhaps this article would have been about him. I think that hypothetical article would have been much preferable to the one that ended up getting written. I fully support the SFoT decision.

 

My basic opinion on this is: If you have no hands, and the worst thing to happen to you is that you can't ride some dumb roller coaster, you're really fudging lucky.

 

This as well...puts things in perspective.

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