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Tokyo Disney Resort Discussion Thread


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Yeah I agree with Robb.

 

The fact that there isn't crazy rioting, fires, buildings collapsing at an alarming rate speaks so well for the Japanese people and their buildings. Just look at Christchurch, NZ for a comparison with a less severe quake.

 

I don't agree with this as I said why in my post. The epicentre of this earthquake was off-shore which saved many buildings along the coast from collapse, unfortunately it triggered the tsunami. Not all of Japanese buildings have been built to the strict standards imposed in the early 70's, there were quite a few shots today of 4/5 story buildings collapsing.

 

There's no doubt that an earthquake of this magnitude would have significant effects in any populated area, look at Chile in 2010, that was an 8.8 eathquake that devasted a large area of the country.

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Construction is well underway (Source, Source) Layout for one of the rides and vague park layout (Source) Dinseysea appear to be experimenting with projection mapping (Source)

...and I just found two photos released by Disney, on the Beauty/Beast Attraction! This is the unload area of the attraction. The "Be Our Guest" part of the attraction. And you can see Belle a

It's so beautiful. Thanks for posting those pics! And just in general for keeping us updated on TDLR!

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^ After you've lived most of your life and experienced a number of serious earthquakes, come back and talk to me. Until then, as someone who has lived through some of the largest earthquakes in US history, I will without a doubt say you have zero clue as to what you're talking about.

 

Sorry Ed, you're just flat out wrong on this one.

 

--Robb "I refuse to have a discussion about something I've lived through with someone who has an opinion based on what they see on a television." Alvey

Edited by robbalvey
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Yes Ed, it had absoutely nothing to do with the fact that the NZ buildings weren't nearly as prepared and up to code as in Japan.

 

Please just stop arguing, you always do this! If someone says the sky is blue you disagree!

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Like Robb, I've lived with earthquakes my entire life and have actually been through the biggest CA earthquakes the past 25 years ... I was at the WS game in SF in 1989 and I was 3 miles from the epicenter in Northridge in 1994.

 

And while I've never been to Japan, from people I know that visit and live there (and even one that grew up here and now lives there) they are SO much more prepared for things like this.

 

Unfortunately, due to the number of earthquakes they get, they ARE prepared for this. Sure they are going to have issues, the damage is utterly devastating. But if this happened in SoCal, you might as well just close the city for a year.

 

If you want to see actual "good" coverage, the BBC is streaming it online:

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12307698

 

Even they are saying how prepared Japan is.

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Ed, just so you can fully understand where I'm coming from, here is one of the many earthquakes I lived through in So Cal and some of the damage that was done...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My point being is that in every earthquake/hurricane/tsunami/natural disaster there is devastating images and horrific looking damage that no one wants to be a part of. But as someone who has actually LIVED THROUGH a situation like the one I've posted above, and on top of it, having been in Japan during natural disasters, I can tell you with some confidence that if there is anyplace I'd rather be in during a natural disaster like this, I'd much rather be in Japan than in Los Angeles.

 

The photos I posted above were from a 6.7 quake. Just to put things into perspective. And in another 6.6 quake we had, I was less than 10 miles from the epicenter. Tell me, Ed, how many strong earthquakes have lived through and been near the epicenter when they happen? Enlighten me with your personal experience in this topic. I'm all ears.

 

Now like I said before, go live through a few serious earthquakes and then come back and discuss. Until then. Shut up. You don't know what you're talking about, and as a friend of yours, you're comments make you look like a fool.

Edited by robbalvey
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As someone who lived in Tokyo for a year, and experienced many earthquakes from a 3.0-6.5 while there on top of growing up in Earthquake prone areas, I have to agree with Robb, if I were to have to go through another large earthquake I would prefer to be in Japan than in LA or back in Seattle, as they are built for them, remain calm, and just take care of what needs to be done afterwards, which normally isn't much. Those pictures Robb posted were from a 6.7 in LA, I was in Tokyo on the 9th floor of a shopping center when a 6.0 ish struck, people stood, remained calm, a manager came out and assured us all that the building was structurally sound for the magniture of earthquake and then life went on as normal. If that were to happen in the US, well all hell would break loose. Point and case watch the videos where american's are filming and freaking out over whats happening vs a Japanese filmer who simple shows whats happening. In this case I think the far more devastating thing that has happened is the Tsunami that has clearly caused far more damage than any of the inland based quakes would have caused to the country.

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^ Agreed. And even those Tsunamis, as devastating as the images are, still nowhere NEAR as horrific as what we've seen in other parts of the world which aren't as prepared.

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After going back to the live feed, it seems that one of the nuclear plants may be going off... If that happens, things could get much worse for the country.

 

Death toll is ranging from 200-300 (more than NZ's quake), but could be higher, especially if the plant goes into meltdown.

 

Japan is a pretty well-prepared country when it comes to quakes (from what I've read and now from the info Robb and others who have gone to Japan and seen this firsthand), so I think country will bounce back faster than most less-prepared countries. I'm actually a lot more worried about the nuclear plant.

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Amazing statistics coming out of Japan are that they have had nearly 100 aftershocks over magnitude 5. Any one of which would cause a disaster in any other country. Scary thought, Tokyo is still overdue for their "Big One" not that this earthquake has anything to do with that.

 

I remember after the Chino Hills 5.4 a couple of years ago, our phone system stopped working. We don't seem to think that far ahead. We know earthquakes area a part of life but aren't willing spend the dollars to make sure people are safe. At UCLA, they didn't retrofit the most vulnerable buildings until they almost collapsed in 94. If the worst case scenario, an 8 on the San Andreas hit, I would want to leave the area. I don't think people around here would react the same as we are seeing in Japan. In 94 there was looting and price gouging. Really, the worst affected areas only comprised a fairly small part of the metro area. A time to pull together became something else entirely. I can't imagine how bad it will be when the 'Big One" hits and the whole region is affected. All the pigeons will come home to roost with things we could have prevented if we thought like the Japanese.

 

Yes, there is massive damage, but this earthquake was of such an increase in magnitude over anything else, that there is little to prevent some of what happened. An earthquake safe building cannot stand if the ground completely breaks apart, and then gets hit by a tsunami. We will see how bad it really is in the next few days. For now, we have to remember what is being shown is the obvious and most visually affective. We won't see the vast majority of buildings and structures that did survive just fine thanks to their preparations. We will see the injured and most understandably upset, we won't see the people who are going about their lives fairly normal again thanks to their preparations.

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I absolutely agree with redmenace here. While not everything could have been prevented (and obviously, not everything was saved or even unharmed), the Japanese have done a remarkable job of surviving a disaster that would have quickly annihilated a large number of other nations. Their efforts to bring about calm and order in such a dire hour need to be commended.

 

On a different note, however, the current situation at the nuclear reactor up north is very worrying. The turnout of that could be a major deciding factor in the lasting effect this disaster has on Japan.

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For now, we have to remember what is being shown is the obvious and most visually affective. We won't see the vast majority of buildings and structures that did survive just fine thanks to their preparations. We will see the injured and most understandably upset, we won't see the people who are going about their lives fairly normal again thanks to their preparations.

Death, destruction and despair...people dying everywhere... makes for better ratings!

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Coming from an area in the world where earthquakes don't do much damage it is weird to see the damage it can do in other parts of the world. The Netherlands is hit several times a year but the quakes are small and get softened by the loose soil. The biggest quake we had was in 1992. A 5.8 quake hit, epicenter about 100 miles from where I live. We felt nothing. Only the direct area of the quake reported damage. Shifted landscape, cracks in walls, falling rooftiles, but nothing major. Just because the soil here works as a natural safeguard against. So it really depends where you live and how you will deal with it.

We are not being prepared for quakes but when it happens people who are affected shout against politici (but we just like that anyway) and against insurance companies for not paying, and life continues. We much more prepare for great floods and industrial accidents.

 

My point is you never know what nature will throw at you and countries can prepare for what they think will be worst for them. (the dutch like to battle water) Just be prepared, don't panic, clean and go on. You will be amazed what people can live through. Personel losses are sad and it looks like a lot of people lost their lives but Japan as a country and a society will pick up the pieces and go on. Probably sooner then most people in the rest of the world.

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I've been watching this on the news off and on, and SantaCruz has seen a couple surges and caused some damage to the harbor. I'm sure as devastating as it is in Japan, should something happen here we would be far less prepared, more like in panic mode. Those aftershocks puts our 1989 Loma Prieta quake to shame in terms of magnitude. I still remember playing outside until things began to rock 'n roll. I had no clue as to what was going on as I was only 4 years old.

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^Indeed. Most people I know haven't heard about it, as only the cable news networks seem to be covering it as of now.

 

EDIT: Didn't want to make another post, but LMAO at the post below mine! So true!

Edited by Ace Of Spades
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One of my Japanese nurses just heard from her family in Japan (from what I understand they are about 30 miles from the epicenter) this morning yet she came to work and was totally calm as if nothing had happened. She said that when she finally spoke to them they were without electricity and having some other issues but they were most upset because their kids were missing school for a few days and they were worried about getting behind the rest of the country. We all laughed and said they are probably still way ahead of the rest of America even if they had to miss a few years. She moved here about 7 years ago and said that earthquakes are just a part of life for them and it is not in their nature to panic like other cultures.

 

I know a lot of people on TPR can have a reputation for being California or LA-haters. Well, I am a 100% California and LA lover and I still think that Japan is MUCH better prepared than we will ever be for a major earthquake!

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