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The End of the Internet.


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Larry, I agree a number of the things he said were distortions of truth or factual errors (yet there was still A LOT of truth in there). That being said, please refer to my original post if you are the type of person (like me) who just appreciates facts.

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^^I totally get it.

 

Here's a couple articles from a media source that I consider pretty informed and objective.

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/16/opinion/firewall-law-could-infringe-on-free-speech.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/02/business/media/the-danger-of-an-attack-on-piracy-online.html

 

And remember how I mentioned GoDaddy as being one of the only companies supporting this?

 

This happened.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-57349913-281/godaddy-bows-to-boycott-now-opposes-sopa-copyright-bill/

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To put it succinctly, a website like TPR or youtube could be immediately blocked and sued if a random member posted a summary of a news article on a park's blog or if a random member even posted a photo of a ride (ride designs are copyrighted) without the express permission of the ride designer and park ahead of time.

 

I read both NY Times' articles and don't see where this is stated. I could see where reposting concept art or ride sketches might fall into a problem area, just as music, movies and books are copyrighted. Although even now without this act, profiting from pictures and vidoes of certain copyrighted materials in parks can bring legal action.

 

I don't see where editorialized product, such as: newspaper articles (digital or online) and online blogs, would fall outside the fair use criteria that currently exists. Unless these editoralized products currently list copyright restrictions.

 

The legal case referenced (Diebold) mentions reprinted company e-mails which are not public domain.

 

If this law passes and the outcome is exactly as you listed in your original post, it will certainly be challenged in court.

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At it's core SOPA removes protection for internet providers or hosts. Previously the DMCA gave a content owner or a website owner protection against a user posting any copyrighted content. I'm going to simplify the issue by using myself and Robb as a case study.

 

In today's world if I post a copyrighted or protected article (including summaries) the copyright holder can send Robb a cease and desist letter. If they aren't cool with my summary then Robb gets an e-mail and takes it down. Life goes on. Even though article summaries or pictures based on content that could be considered newsworthy fall under the "fair use" clause of the copyright law.

 

With SOPA, If I post part of an article or a photo from another website even if I believe it to be "newsworthy or for criticism" and the copyright holder or original source believe it be infringing on their copyright then TPR (or any site) could be immediately black listed (their DNS name would be blocked from hosting servers) and sued without the "due process" of taking it down.

 

In an active forum like TPR (and in the worst case scenario), every post would have to be reviewed by a moderator to protect the owner of the website from being sued and the site blacklisted from the internet. If this law is passed, a moderator would likely always err on the side of caution and delete posts that the courts would consider legitimate for the reasons above.

 

There are already companies that troll the internet looking to stop sites that summarize articles. Righthaven based out of Nevada was a company that sued websites for having independent users just like TPR posting article summaries in the way we do today (which is completely legal). They've even sued a motorcycle website for posting an unreleased photo of a motorcycle concept. I'm sure you can imagine how that could be converted to the roller coaster world.

 

-chris "will update this with sources" connolly

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They've even sued a motorcycle website for posting an unreleased photo of a motorcycle concept. I'm sure you can imagine how that could be converted to the roller coaster world.

I actually fail to see how this is a problem - I have no problem with companies protecting what they want to keep secret. Without looking up the details of the case you're referencing (apparently that group has filed hundreds of suits), I see no reason why a trade secret can't be protected.

 

I'm not crazy about creating a police state on the internet, or giving the government any more power, but if protecting trade secrets is what we're talking about - I dunno. I still think that jobs should be the pressing issue, or maybe all these net cops will solve all of our problems

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To be honest, I'm not concerned about any of this.

 

There's two things I'm convinced the American people will find the willpower to rally together to prevent from happening:

 

1) Food being taken away.

2) The government effing with their internet, and/or television.

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At it's core SOPA removes protection for internet providers or hosts. Previously the DMCA gave a content owner or a website owner protection against a user posting any copyrighted content. I'm going to simplify the issue by using myself and Robb as a case study.

 

If everybody was open about who they are on the internet and people didn't hide behind false identities/personas the user posting the content could be pursued versus the website hosting the posts.

 

That's the problem with this country nowadays, lack of personal accountability.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Since today is the official day to protest SOPA, I thought it might be important to bump this thread with something a friend just shared with me.

 

It makes me think about all of the user generated content I spend time reading here and on other sites.

 

 

Via the www.cynicalbrit.com (no link as he is blacked out today) -via Ian.

 

Let's be honest, the people behind SOPA/PIPA are smart, very smart. They know without a doubt the bill will not put a dent in piracy. The kind of people who pirate and run piracy services are far too smart to be brought to heel by mere legislation and have continued to elude the best efforts of the US and it's lackeys. SOPA/PIPA exists for one reason, to protect an aging and crooked business model, dominated by large corporations who are slowly but surely being eroded by people like you and me. These corporations want to stifle the internet because the internet is the biggest threat to their dominance that has ever existed. For decades, through control of radio stations and television channels, corporations have made bank, but now, all the money in the world can't save them from guys in their bedrooms and home-made studios creating content that is more relevant to the current generation. The variety the big media corporations refused to provide because it "wasn't profitable", is now being provided by hundreds of thousands of amateur, semi-pro and professional independent creators and directors and we're all competing for the most important currency of all, time. The time you spend watching our material is time you don't spend watching theirs. It's money directly out of their pocket that they could have been earning before the internet came along and that's the hilarious thing about this whole deal. Piracy is not what's killing their profits, completely legitimate competition from the internet is. They use the cause of "fighting piracy" as a trojan horse to force through bought and paid for legislation to kill independent content creation for good because they can see the end is nigh for their aging and increasingly irrelevant business model. They know they cannot win legitimately, so they do what they've always done, exploit a corrupt political system to bully and extort their way to what they want.

 

This is what SOPA/PIPA are really about and that is why you should oppose them. You are standing up for what your generation represents, just as previous generations have done the same on a slew of different issues. As much as those in power would like us to believe we are the apathetic, lazy generation. The truth is we are anything but and that scares the shit out of them.

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^They are both looking to go public this year (which requires a HUGE amount of governmental redtape) so they probably don't want to rock the boat (or lose the huge revenue stream for even a day) . They have both actively lobbied the government to stop both bills though.

 

via twitter's CEO - "Closing a global business in reaction to single-issue national politics is foolish," - Though they have spent lots of time and money standing against it. It would have been nice to see either one of them just change their logo for the day, but they probably aren't set up to do that like google is.

Edited by Chroniq
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