Jump to content
  TPR Home | Parks | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Instagram 

KMG new rides in 2012 and 2013


Recommended Posts

KMG is currently working on a deal for a “Speed” (Booster) ride about 230-feet tall and holding 24 to 32 riders. The first unit will be delivered in 2013. Also planned for 2013 is a 230-foot Inversion that will premiere in Europe. Both rides will be available in transportable and park versions, travel on 4 semi-trailers, and come with the latest in LED technology, scenery, and sound systems. No crane is required for either attraction. Concept drawings for these rides will be available at the IAAPA Convention.

 

Also from KMG is the tallest transportable chain swing ride to date, The KMG Stratosphere. This new ride is constructed on two trailers and has a telescopic tower reaching a height of 214-feet along the midway. According to KMG, the complete tower rotates during the ride cycle and is equipped with LED lights along the tower, arms, seats, operator booth, and entrance. The ride is comprised of 12 seats, each holding two people. Set up takes between five and six hours, no crane required. The first unit has been purchased by McDonagh’s Amusements and will be ready for the 2012 season.

 

Now ready for the midway is KMG’s XLR8. As described in the March 2011 issue, XLR8 holds 16 passengers in 8 gondolas. During operation, the ride reaches a speed of 65km/hour, offering extreme acceleration and deceleration. “First test runs have been made and were very impressive,” says Peter Theunisz of KMG. “We’re installing a new LED light system and completing artwork now.”

 

Soon available from KMG is the new ride, Sicko. This swing ride is five meters higher than the Fire Ball and has the same set up system as the XXL. The pendulum (swing-arm) is V-shaped and swings up to 120˚ with motorized, rotating seats. The Sicko is constructed on two semi-trailers and can be set up without a crane. The ride swings up to 85 ft. The first Sicko is sold to France and will be delivered in May 2012. The ride will be revealed at the IAAPA Show.

 

 

Link:

http://themepark.nl/ubb/ubbthreads.php/topics/1432486/123.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 23
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

  • 3 weeks later...

Here in germany showmen also get the quite cheap "industrial power" on fairs that only costs a fraction of "private power" for you and me. This way for example we still have aluminum plants....and big rides on fairs....

 

Private users pay higher prices so high-energy industries can be competitve on an international scale.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I was disappointed not to be able to ride KMG's big new Mission Space this year at the Bonn Pützchensmarkt because it apparently didn't get TüV (German safety authority) approval! Hopefully these new rides will be a little more TüV - friendly and will appear at some of the big German fairs as well as the big Dutch fairs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

^ Yeah, since the point of the ride seems to be acceleration, I would guess that they would "pulse" the cycle as shown in that section of the video, switching between the slow relaxing speed and full speed.

 

The thing I'm curious about is how many G's this ride pulls...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guessing that the radius of spin is six meters, you would be pulling 5.5G if the seats were swung to a position parallel to the arms (like an enterprise) and traveling tangentially at 65km/h.

 

EDIT: Eight meters is probably more reasonable though, at which you would be pulling 4.2G.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^Way off. The individual seats look to be two feet wide, so each "pod" is about four feet wide. The radius by measuring with my fingers is approximately four times that width, or 16 feet. Converting that to meters is 4.87 meters. So the circumference of travel is 30.64 meters. It travels one revolution in 3 seconds at max speed, (20 rpm) so the tangential velocity is 10.2 m/s. a = v^2 / r = (10.2^2) / 4.87 = 21.42 m/s^2. One "G" is an integer multiple of 9.8 m/s^2, which is earth's gravitational pull. So, this thing only pulls about 2.2 G's at the rider's heads. In order to pull 4.2 G's, it would have to travel at 14.2 m/s, or one revolution every 2.2 seconds (27 rpm)

 

Your radius and your velocities were off by nearing a factor of 2. Mine are guaranteed to be off by a decent amount, but I'd like to wager I'm within +/- 0.3 G's.

Edited by Tanks4me05
Link to comment
Share on other sites

^More likely the ride's tangential acceleration combined with the swinging caused by that action. Acceleration forces is technically a misnomer (or not accurate enough) because all forces are caused by acceleration. [/nerd.]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whatever, I'm always off. It's still going to be a pretty intense experience.

 

Maybe if it's small enough, I'll buy one to put in my backyard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That 230 foot Booster sounds terrifying. Skycrapers are really the only type of ride that always scare me, and when our Fabbri Booster at a Belgian fair went into "hyper speed" I thought my legs were going to explode. 230 feet? Buhhhh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

^As it has been said elsewhere on the forums a couple of times, the business model is totally different. Independent owners all charge their own admission per ride (usually $10-15 USD). Our system in the U.S. of all you can ride wristband promotions and companies owning multiple rides doesn't encourage huge investment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use https://themeparkreview.com/forum/topic/116-terms-of-service-please-read/