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What is the best place for a coaster enthusiast to live?


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Many coaster enthuesiest think that SoCal and Florida are the way to go. But are there even better places to be near better theme parks? I think that the Jersey Shore is beacuse of 1. LOTS of Piers 2. Near SFGAd, Hershey, Dorney Park, Knoebles, and Lake Compounce are all close by. 3. CONEY ISLAND! What other places around the world can you think of?

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Depends on your age!

 

If you're under 21, England is clearly a superior place to live. More specifically, in and around London. It's easy to get around on public transport, so if you're too young to drive can still get to parks. And even if you're old enough to drive, you'll have to wait till you're 21 to book a hotel in America, not in the UK! It's also cheap to get flights in and around Europe compared to the USA. Also, denser population here means you're more likely to find fellow enthusiasts nearby.

 

But, if you're above 21, the USA is a hell of a lot better for obvious reasons. I think Pennsylvania is a pretty epic location, because you're damn close to a hell of a variety of parks.

 

I personally think it's better to live near a meh park which has a variety of meh rides that you won't ruin by overriding than eing right next to awesome coasters. So Cedar Point sounds like a good place to be local to, until you remember how busy that park is perpetually and how their rides close for rain.

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I would say:

 

Just outside LA, close to SFMM, Disneyland, USH and Knotts

 

Tampa, close to BGA, Disneyworld, USF

 

France, close to Eurodisney, but easy to travel to the UK, Spain, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands.

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An interesting question, and one I've given some thought to in the past. Are we assuming that you'll only go to "local" parks, or are short trips a possibility also? Keep in mind that both Central Florida and Southern California are fairly isolated from most other areas.

 

On the other hand, when I lived in Pigeon Forge, not only did I have Dollywood in my backyard (which operates about 9 months out of the year), I also had a whole range of good seasonal parks within a day's drive: Busch Gardens Williamsburg, King's Dominion, King's Island, Holiday World, Lake Winnie, Six Flags Over Georgia, Carowinds, Beech Bend, Kentucky Kingdom--even Cedar Point if I really pushed it.

 

From Central Florida you might make it up to SFOG--but that's about it, realistically. Southern California is perhaps a bit better, with some parks to the North and Las Vegas to the East. But still, how good are Southern California's actual parks these days, anyway?

 

Speaking of which, what kind of parks do you like? If you're more of a traditionalist, Central Florida may not be your best choice, dominated as it is by high-tech family rides and theming.

 

Is the actual area (you know, like, nature) important? Personally, I can't imagine ever moving back to Southern California (where I'm originally from), because I dislike concrete and the color gray.

 

On the other hand, someplace like Eastern Pennsylvania might be loaded up with great parks within close driving range, but can you handle only having access to them for half the year (and being a Popsicle the other half)?

 

There's more to life than parks, you know.

 

But, for the record, I live in Orlando.

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Depends on your age!

 

If you're under 21, England is clearly a superior place to live. More specifically, in and around London. It's easy to get around on public transport, so if you're too young to drive can still get to parks. And even if you're old enough to drive, you'll have to wait till you're 21 to book a hotel in America, not in the UK!

 

But, if you're above 21, the USA is a hell of a lot better for obvious reasons.

I think you're a bit off the mark here. I'm pretty sure most hotels are 18+, and since kids in the US start driving at 16, road trips to parks are not as difficult as you make them out to be.

 

 

I personally think it's better to live near a meh park which has a variety of meh rides that you won't ruin by overriding than being right next to awesome coasters.

Yeah, having a perfect home park would suck. I pity those people in Orlando and Eastern PA.

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Depends on your age!

 

If you're under 21, England is clearly a superior place to live. More specifically, in and around London. It's easy to get around on public transport, so if you're too young to drive can still get to parks. And even if you're old enough to drive, you'll have to wait till you're 21 to book a hotel in America, not in the UK!

 

But, if you're above 21, the USA is a hell of a lot better for obvious reasons.

I think you're a bit off the mark here. I'm pretty sure most hotels are 18+, and since kids in the US start driving at 16, road trips to parks are not as difficult as you make them out to be.

Well it's just a personal observation. I'm over 21... but the people I went on a road trip with in the US this year were not. I had to book all the hotels because every one required you to be over 21. It's not like we were staying at fancy places either. They were Super 8's and things like that.

 

I don't even think there's an age requirement at home... Certainly NEVER been asked and I've been to hotels on my own at 16.

 

As for 16 year olds doing road trips... I get the impression that most American teens are treated by their parents like 5 year olds. Whether that's a bad thing is debatable, but teens do have more freedom at home generally speaking. How many American parents would let their 16 year olds, who've just started driving, on a road trip out of State? Plenty of UK teens can get about to practically all the major parks by train.

 

For those younger than 16, being an American must really suck. You literally cannot do anything unless you drive in most parts of the US. If you live in London, though, you have easy access to Thorpe and Chessington when mum or dad won't drive you.

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As for 16 year olds doing road trips... I get the impression that most American teens are treated by their parents like 5 year olds. Whether that's a bad thing is debatable, but teens do have more freedom at home generally speaking. How many American parents would let their 16 year olds, who've just started driving, on a road trip out of State? Plenty of UK teens can get about to practically all the major parks by train.

You're also generalizing here. You're taking the mindset of a group of coaster enthusiasts and translating it to all American kids 16-20. Most teens have no need or desire to take long road trips, at least until they're in college.

 

For those younger than 16, being an American must really suck. You literally cannot do anything unless you drive in most parts of the US. If you live in London, though, you have easy access to Thorpe and Chessington when mum or dad won't drive you.

Yes, America is truly a land of socially deprived children under the age of 16, due to the fact that they can't easily access most theme parks out of state.

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Lol.

 

You're twisting everything I say. Since the topic is discussing enthusiasts, it would make sense for me to talk about enthusiasts. As for young American's not having freedom, this could be applied to anything... Visiting shopping malls, parks, sports centres, etc. I don't drive, I've been in the US for 8 and a bit weeks, I can clearly see how it must suck to not drive here. You have to rely on someone else to take you absolutely anywhere. There is no where within distance to walk to and even if there was, there are no sidewalks to get there. What do American kids do when they aren't in school? There's plenty of reasons why individuals under 21 would want to go and stay in a hotel. To visit the beach, concerts, etc. I was using the example of theme parks, since that's what this forum, and specifically this topic, is about.

 

You started by telling me that most hotels are 18+. I told you that I know from experience that this isn't true. We stayed in hotels in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Georgia and all required you to be 21 and have some form of ID to prove it. This is alien in the UK. I can see how it's a good thing, I'm not arguing about that, all I'm saying is that if you're under 21 it's a bit of a bummer.

 

You then changed your argument point completely to most people between the age of 16-21 don't want to book a hotel anyway, which isn't true, and even if it was it wouldn't matter since we're discussing enthusiasts... Not most 16-21 year olds.

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You started by telling me that most hotels are 18+. I told you that I know from experience that this isn't true. We stayed in hotels in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Georgia and all required you to be 21 and have some form of ID to prove it. This is alien in the UK. I can see how it's a good thing, I'm not arguing about that, all I'm saying is that if you're under 21 it's a bit of a bummer.

I stand corrected, as it is actually 21. My other points still stand.

 

 

What do American kids do when they aren't in school?

They obviously dream of living in the UK.

 

 

 

Scott "I still managed to get around just fine from 16-21" B.

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An interesting question, and one I've given some thought to in the past. Are we assuming that you'll only go to "local" parks, or are short trips a possibility also? Keep in mind that both Central Florida and Southern California are fairly isolated from most other areas.

 

On the other hand, when I lived in Pigeon Forge, not only did I have Dollywood in my backyard (which operates about 9 months out of the year), I also had a whole range of good seasonal parks within a day's drive: Busch Gardens Williamsburg, King's Dominion, King's Island, Holiday World, Lake Winnie, Six Flags Over Georgia, Carowinds, Beech Bend, Kentucky Kingdom--even Cedar Point if I really pushed it.

 

From Central Florida you might make it up to SFOG--but that's about it, realistically. Southern California is perhaps a bit better, with some parks to the North and Las Vegas to the East. But still, how good are Southern California's actual parks these days, anyway?

 

Speaking of which, what kind of parks do you like? If you're more of a traditionalist, Central Florida may not be your best choice, dominated as it is by high-tech family rides and theming.

 

Is the actual area (you know, like, nature) important? Personally, I can't imagine ever moving back to Southern California (where I'm originally from), because I dislike concrete and the color gray.

 

On the other hand, someplace like Eastern Pennsylvania might be loaded up with great parks within close driving range, but can you handle only having access to them for half the year (and being a Popsicle the other half)?

 

There's more to life than parks, you know.

 

But, for the record, I live in Orlando.

 

I've been thinking that all of those places are great!(But your right about the parks in the north being closed half the year.) I guess that it just has to be which type of park do you like. Disney, or Six Flags? I've grown up in Dallas so SFOT is the only park within about 5 hours from here (Aside from Frontier City, but that park kind of sucks.) I would have never imagined living close to a big tourist destination like Disney or Universal. So I wouldn't die if I never get to live by one. Another answer that interested me was France. Technically, Paris is almost just a days drive from every major theme park in eastern Europe.They have Disneyland, and Parc Astrix. 5 hours from Thorpe Park, 8 hours from Alton Towers. Within 5 hours from every Walibi park. About 5 hours from Europa Park, Phantasialand, Holiday Park, and Efteling. And about 8 hours from Barcelona and Heide-Park. I mean, thats a lot of parks, plus the hundreds of smaller parks. Now THATS a GREAT year!

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I know a LOT of people say SoCal ... but I think that's mostly from people who haven't lived here for 35 years.

 

Sure, we have some GREAT parks (Magic Mountain, Disneyland/DCA). Some ok parks (Knott's) and some other awesome non-coaster type family parks (Sea World, Legoland). And then the smaller parks (Castle Park, Pacific Park, Adventure City, Belmont Park).

 

But ... while there are a LOT of coasters, IMO, we don't have any "Great" coasters. A lot of "Good" coasters though.

 

And as was said above, from SoCal to get anywhere else you with a great concentration of other parks you are talking a 5-6 hour drive (Bay Area) or a days drive (Texas) or you have to get on a plane. Even getting from LA County even down to Sea World/Legoland is not very easy and getting from where I live to the OC parks can take up to 3 hours with traffic.

 

It just seems to me that once you are on the east coast, you can drive a few hours in pretty much any direction and get to a decent park.

 

Maybe I'm wrong since I've never lived there, but that's what it seems to me.

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Couldn't you argue that no matter where you live, the parks closest to you will be the ones you visit most frequently? Therefore those parks, by definition, will be the ones you get bored of most quickly, no matter how good they are, right? So, in answer to your question, I reckon the best place for a coaster enthusiast to live would be a camper van!

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What do American kids do when they aren't in school?

 

Swim in their parents pool and relax in their hot tub in the morning, at least that's what I do because we live in literally the boondocks. Out here, if you want to do something you practically have to own it. But in all the nearby towns and stuff there are pools and stuff that people go to. They (not me) hunt or camping during the summer, and at my school for two-thirds of the entire student body, summer practically ends in 4 days. Between then and the beginning of regular classes, there are sports tryouts, and training/practicing, academic practices (quizbowl), and marching/field show practices for color guard, instrumentalists, and drum line.

 

I dread that damned alarm clock!

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What do American kids do when they aren't in school?

 

Swim in their parents pool and relax in their hot tub in the morning, at least that's what I do because we live in literally the boondocks. Out here, if you want to do something you practically have to own it. But in all the nearby towns and stuff there are pools and stuff that people go to. They (not me) hunt or camping during the summer, and at my school for two-thirds of the entire student body, summer practically ends in 4 days. Between then and the beginning of regular classes, there are sports tryouts, and training/practicing, academic practices (quizbowl), and marching/field show practices for color guard, instrumentalists, and drum line.

 

I dread that damned alarm clock!

I think you'll be thankful when your older that you did so much. There is no pressure on kids in the UK to really do anything. You can leave school at 16, so many people do. It's actually pretty incredible how culturally different things are between the UK and the USA. As for your comment about having to own something to do it, that was my general observation. I get the impression that out here in the US, people spend their money on having nice things... In the UK, people spend their money on going places to do nice things. Practically all our disposable income when I was growing up went towards holidays abroad in Spain and Greece.

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What do you mean, do so many things? I'm only a trumpeter and on the quizbowl team. It IS impossible to do it all here. You must carefully decide what you want to do. I don't (never [ever {will Never}]) do sports or hunting as I find them extremely pointless. Some do attempt to do as many as possible, but most times they get hit the hardest.

 

But wouldn't some rural places in the UK be similar to the US in general?

 

EDIT: I am never going to drop out of school. I will probably be in college until I am old and gray. Bachelor's, Master's, Specialist's, and hopefully eventually Doctorate.

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What do American kids do when they aren't in school?

Umm, I sit at home and play video games. Sometimes I'll walk to the store, but it's too far to walk there on a daily basis. When I'm at my dads place, I'll go swimming, he lives in a condo complex with a pool But otherwise my summers are epically boring. I'm just glad my dad has such a flexible schedule that he can drive me and my friends around town

 

And about 16 year olds taking road trips, me and a few friends are already planning on taking a road trip to a theme park (as soon as we are of age ), I just have to convince the girls to sleep in the car... They would pay for a hotel

Now convincing my parents to let me go, that's another story...

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What do you mean, do so many things? I'm only a trumpeter and on the quizbowl team.[/qupte]

More than I ever did for extra curricular activities!

 

But wouldn't some rural places in the UK be similar to the US in general?

Whilst places like that undoubtedly exist in very rural areas, I've never been somewhere that bad. I've stayed with a friend up north, who doesn't drive, and we have to walk 40 mins to the train station. There is a bus, but it never runs as early as we needed to leave. I guess that's similar, but the point is you can still walk to the train station... and along the route you'll find plenty of shops and such.

 

Public transport, even at it's worst, can still get you around here fairly easily... I only know a handful of people in my age group who drive, because it's simply not worth it.

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In the US, unless you can drive, SoCal and Orlando are the best places to be. You have several parks nearby, and unless you have flexible parents, you won't be traveling much, so you might as well have the most close-by, easy-to-get-to parks around possible.

 

Once you're old enough to start traveling frequently, SoCal and Orlando will get boring because you don't have too much variety, you'll most likely be tired of the parks already, and other than your little area, it takes a lot of effort to get anywhere else. For example, I've completed California, plus Las Vegas, Lagoon, and Castles n' Coasters. Now what do I do? My only option is to drive 20 hours to Texas... which isn't exactly ideal. I've always thought Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia are perfect places as you can make weekend trips to several parks, as opposed to being stuck and bored with the same parks for years.

 

In the end, though, weather plays the biggest factor into where I want to live, so to avoid the humidity, I'd prefer to just stick with SoCal... I mean, KBF will probably get something interesting in a few years, right?!

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I'm actually partial to where I live, outside Philly.

 

45 minutes from Dorney

1.5 hours from Hershey, and Six Flags Great Adventure

2 hrs (at most) from Knoebels

2 hrs from Jersey Shore, Deleware Shore, and Ocean City Maryland Shore points

2.5 from Six Flags America

 

Then there's all the little parks up towards new england ways that are anywhere from 1-3 hours depending on traffic and construction.

 

And heck pushing it you can go 5 hours out and head up to all the Western Pa parks.

 

Living here you kind of take it for granted how much is right around here.

 

(and travel times are based upon my slight tendency to speed. )

 

 

Nicole

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As someone who spent a ton of time traveling starting right after I graduated high school (a week after my 18th birthday), I honestly can't remember ever being denied a hotel because of my age - and I probably spent a good of 50-60 nights in hotels between the ages of 18 and 21, taking trips all over the east and Midwestern US. In fact, I think there were only 2 or 3 times where I was even asked for my ID, and I am hardly mature looking (some 16-year-olds look older than me!). Yes, there ARE some that require you to be 21 (Universal Orlando's resort comes to mind) but you can always find an alternative.

 

And Americans love road trips, and that feeling is especially ripe in the college years.

 

As for the original question, Orlando. Great local parks and access to flights that go nearly anywhere.

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I'd have to say living in the eastern US is pretty sweet. I kind of live in the "Mid Atlantic," but find myself spending more time coaster wise in the north east/PA. I couldn't imagine a better place to live in the U.S. than New England. You have Compounce and SFNE which means Boulder Dash and SROS...some people argue to be the best wood and steel coasters in the world...in your back yard. And your withen a reasonable drive from El Toro. The downsize is you live in the North East, get lots of snow, and speak in the ugliest accent ever!

 

Other places that look like they would be awesome to live, though I've been to none of them, are California, Florida, and Germany....so you get to live in fairly cool looking places and have great parks.

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I live in one of the worst places in relationship to amusement parks.

 

Michigan's Adventure: 1.25-1.5 hours

SF Great America: 5.5-6 hours

Cedar Point: 6 hours

Wisconsin Dells area: 7-8 hours (involves ferry travel)

Kings Island: 8 hours

Holiday World: 9-9.5 hours

Valleyfair: 11-12 hours (involves ferry travel)

 

I've only been to the first three.

 

In my opinion, the best place for a coaster enthusiast to live (during the summer) is in the Philadelphia area. You have Dorney Park and SF Great Adventure about 1 hour away, Hershey Park about 1.5 hours away, Knoebels and SF America about 2.5 hours away, Kings Dominion about 4.5 hours away, Kennywood and the other Western PA parks about 5 hours away, and Busch Gardens about 5.5 hours away. Even Cedar Point is within 8 hours. During the winter, the best place is either Southern California or the Lakeland, Florida (halfway between Tampa and Orlando) area. In Southern California, you have SF Magic Mountain, Universal Studios Hollywood, Disneyland, California Adventure, Knott's Berry Farm, Legoland, and Sea World San Diego within three hours. In Lakeland, Florida, Busch Gardens, Disney World, Universal Orlando, and Sea World Florida are all within one hour.

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