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Over The Shoulder Restraints. (OTSRs)


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RMC does have super fast transitions, but there is airtime during the transitions so your body doesn't experience as much lateral G as heartline transitions. RMC coasters take certain transitions while the heartline is on a zero G or negative G parabola and the top view is also two halves of parabola facing opposite directions, like how the off-axis airtime hill on Storm Chaser works. It's probably a bit confusing but let's just say this is RMC magic. While Intamin also does super fast transitions when the heartline is on a parabola, the top view is a straight line that's why Intamin transitions has a lot more lateral G.

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There is a restraint classification system where certain restraints are necessary due to acceleration or force in an axis.

 

The document you're looking for is F2291, which does contain the aforementioned force limits for motion constrained at the hip (lap bar) vs at the shoulder (OTS). No, they're not enforceable, they're just engineering standards. But almost every manufacturer follows them.

 

but there is airtime during the transitions so your body doesn't experience as much lateral G as heartline transitions. RMC coasters take certain transitions while the heartline is on a zero G or negative G parabola and the top view is also two halves of parabola facing opposite directions

 

What you're describing here is actually a higher net lateral force on RMC transitions. However, it feels different because your entire body experiences a lateral force in the same direction. In the case of a heartline transition, even though rotation is the same for your head and feet, they feel equal and opposite lateral forces, not unlike that of a force couple. Because your body is rotating slightly behind the train, the opposing force causes a feeling of higher jerk, but not a higher value.

 

tl;dr - Kinetics

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RMC transitions are just as snappy as Maverick's if not more snappy. Maybe not every transition on every RMC coaster, but I can think of a few transitions on Outlaw Run that make Maverick feel like a wacky worm.

 

What?? Please show me exactly what transitions you are talking about.. Maverick pretty much set the bar for insane transitions that I have only seen other intamins compete with.

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^ The 2 smartest, most hilarious people on the forums right here. The limit on G force and how much support a person needs to avoid injury is a relative one, it's different for different people. As a coaster enthusiast, this should be obvious if one has at least a high school education. The back rows on Outlaw Run and Goliath can cause smaller riders to slam into the sides of the car upon exiting the rolls and stalls, but in general the vast majority won't be injured. But remove the OTSR vests on Maverick and I305, you would see several cases of whiplash and lesser injuries due to impact with the seat or person seated next to them.

 

Your attitude is toxic. Lighten up dude.

 

This post is realatively sensible aside from you taking personal offense to every single post anyone makes about anything ever but your last post implied some imaginary and ultra specific g force limit that you're somehow aware of and then informed us exactly how far above and below said limit certain coasters were when obviously none of us have a clue. When you routinely spew things you made up as fact then people are going to call you out on it like thrilladdict did. The funny thing is the 2 people who you're mad at aren't even the ones that called you out.

 

You consistently follow the same pattern of making things up, and then when people question it you respond with insults rather than an actual response because (since you just make things up) you have no actual sources or argument for anything you say. Even if there is an ultra specific limit you have no idea what that ultra specific limit is and how far above or below the limit each coaster is. Period. None of us do.

 

I'll actually give you credit, this reeks of bull*** but there are actually sources for it being true. I don't know how credible they are but I've seen variations of this story in a few places after searching it.

When I was writing it, I knew it sounded like BS, however I said it was just a story. If true, it shows how good a simple lap bar can be.

 

It's actually a cool story though, I'm glad you turned me on to it.

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There is a restraint classification system where certain restraints are necessary due to acceleration or force in an axis.

 

The document you're looking for is F2291, which does contain the aforementioned force limits for motion constrained at the hip (lap bar) vs at the shoulder (OTS). No, they're not enforceable, they're just engineering standards. But almost every manufacturer follows them.

 

but there is airtime during the transitions so your body doesn't experience as much lateral G as heartline transitions. RMC coasters take certain transitions while the heartline is on a zero G or negative G parabola and the top view is also two halves of parabola facing opposite directions

 

What you're describing here is actually a higher net lateral force on RMC transitions. However, it feels different because your entire body experiences a lateral force in the same direction. In the case of a heartline transition, even though rotation is the same for your head and feet, they feel equal and opposite lateral forces, not unlike that of a force couple. Because your body is rotating slightly behind the train, the opposing force causes a feeling of higher jerk, but not a higher value.

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^ The 2 smartest, most hilarious people on the forums right here. The limit on G force and how much support a person needs to avoid injury is a relative one, it's different for different people. As a coaster enthusiast, this should be obvious if one has at least a high school education. The back rows on Outlaw Run and Goliath can cause smaller riders to slam into the sides of the car upon exiting the rolls and stalls, but in general the vast majority won't be injured. But remove the OTSR vests on Maverick and I305, you would see several cases of whiplash and lesser injuries due to impact with the seat or person seated next to them.

 

Rider position on Maverick and I305 is also quite a bit different than on the RMC trains. Also, as anyone coherent enough to apply thoughts to a keyboard or voice recognition apparatus for recording might recognize, you'll have great sensation of lateral force with an OTSR that is in constant contact with the body simply because it exists. This has absolutely nothing to do with whether or not greater force is applied.

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With the old Intamin OTSR's on Maverick the top part never touched my upper body, only the lap bar part. This is one of the reasons why I never had an issue with them since they didn't feel like a typical OTSR. Honestly with those old restraints, it felt like you rode Maverick with simply a lap bar.

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RMC transitions are just as snappy as Maverick's if not more snappy. Maybe not every transition on every RMC coaster, but I can think of a few transitions on Outlaw Run that make Maverick feel like a wacky worm.

 

What?? Please show me exactly what transitions you are talking about.. Maverick pretty much set the bar for insane transitions that I have only seen other intamins compete with.

 

The first two that come to mind are: The exit from the first inversion, and the airtime hill directly below the lift hill.

 

Both provide crazy sideways lateral forces that give Maverick a run for its money.

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After reading and thinking, I think the reason why RMC coasters are still comfortable without OTSR is because the seats are in a bucket shape so support your body during lateral transition forces. The old seats like on Intamin Maverick have little to lo lateral supports meaning the riders will be thrown around lots more. By having the OSTR there it means your body is supported laterally.

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After reading and thinking, I think the reason why RMC coasters are still comfortable without OTSR is because the seats are in a bucket shape so support your body during lateral transition forces. The old seats like on Intamin Maverick have little to lo lateral supports meaning the riders will be thrown around lots more. By having the OSTR there it means your body is supported laterally.

 

*Ding ding ding* We have a winner!!

 

I was thinking the same thing in regards to RMC coasters. The seats very much so wrap around the sides of your body providing a type of lateral support. However, seats like Maverick don't really have the same sideways support, so the OTSR's help out with the lack of good lateral support of the seats.

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^ Is that sarcasm or genuine approval of a point?

 

Given that I followed up the "*ding ding ding* we have a winner," with a clear example of how RMC's seats provide lateral support that other seats lack, I'd say it's "genuine approval of a point."

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With the old Intamin OTSR's on Maverick the top part never touched my upper body, only the lap bar part. This is one of the reasons why I never had an issue with them since they didn't feel like a typical OTSR. Honestly with those old restraints, it felt like you rode Maverick with simply a lap bar.

 

They touched the hell out of my neck, and I know I'm hardly the only one with that opinion. Thank god for the vests.

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  • 9 months later...

I like OSTRs, and if a looping ride doesn't have an OSTR, I won't get on it.

Can I ask why you feel that way? It's been proven time and time again that OTSRs are not really needed on looping coasters as long as a lap bar is adequate enough to keep you in place while inversions occur.

I'm aware of what you are saying.

I've experienced what you're talking about on the Joker's Jinx at Six Flags America.

Most inverting coasters I get on have an OTSR and that's what I'm used to.

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I like OSTRs, and if a looping ride doesn't have an OSTR, I won't get on it.

Can I ask why you feel that way? It's been proven time and time again that OTSRs are not really needed on looping coasters as long as a lap bar is adequate enough to keep you in place while inversions occur.

I'm aware of what you are saying.

I've experienced what you're talking about on the Joker's Jinx at Six Flags America.

Most inverting coasters I get on have an OTSR and that's what I'm used to.

 

I rode Flight Of Fear with the original OTSRs and I don't think you'd ever get used to it. The fact people can actually talk about the ride instead of dismissing it as a headbanger is entirely due to the restraints change. At least they were padded though, unlike Drachen Fire's. That ride may have had a lot of problems, but I never could figure out why no one else could see the obvious: steel is hard!

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