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Six Flags Great Adventure (SFGAdv) Discussion Thread


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Just to clear this up, airtime is the sensation of being forced into the restraint, not specifically being lifted off the seat.

 

No airtime is when your butt actually leaves the seat. Being forced into a restraint without your butt leaving the seat is not airtime.

 

Airtime = time in the air. If you don't leave the seat there is not airtime.

 

If this was the case, very few modern roller coasters would be considered to have airtime. Airtime can also refer to the lightness your body feels (like the feeling of being in the air) your body experiences during negative G moments. When youre free-falling on a seat, you feel weightless even though youre on a platform. If you hit 0 G's or less, you feel weightless, which = airtime.

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Just to clear this up, airtime is the sensation of being forced into the restraint, not specifically being lifted off the seat.

 

No airtime is when your butt actually leaves the seat. Being forced into a restraint without your butt leaving the seat is not airtime.

 

Airtime = time in the air. If you don't leave the seat there is not airtime.

 

I completely disagree with this. By your definition Skyrush has no airtime (If you think this, you're very mistaken...). Your definition of "airtime" is arbitrary and merely depends of tightness of the restraint and can vary person to person, even on the same cycle.

 

I certainly feel my body leaving the seat on SkyRush as I get lifted into the restraint .

 

Arbitrary is not the proper word choice. My definition is far from random. It might be a personal definition, but it far from arbitrary. I believe I adequately described how I defined airtime. I am not denying the existing of g-forces on some rides only saying that if I'm not lifted in the air I don't consider it airtime.

 

f you don't leave the seat there is not airtime.

 

That's a needlessly ananacronistic way to define airtime...

 

I believe the word you are searching for is anachronistic. And, yes I certainly feel that if you have two identical rides and one has tight restraints and the other has minimal restraints the latter will provide more airtime.

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Adding to this discussion. You know how the Voyage technically has the most (measured) airtime, around 25 seconds or so? That's because it has the most and most drawn out portions of negative g's than any other coatser. Now, I haven't heard many people say they leave their seat on a The Voyage. Take this as you will, but this tells me that airtime is negative g's, not physically leaving your seat. If it was the latter, The Voyage would not retain this record.

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I certainly feel my body leaving the seat on SkyRush as I get lifted into the restraint .

 

I must not understand what you mean, as this coaster notoriously "staples" riders on every ride, and stapling seems to be a large deterrent of your idea of airtime.

 

You're right, arbitrary was the wrong word. My point is that your version of airtime is completely subjective, and personally, I view airtime as something that's existence shouldn't vary with opninion. But it doesn't really matter anyway!

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I believe the word you are searching for is anachronistic. And, yes I certainly feel that if you have two identical rides and one has tight restraints and the other has minimal restraints the latter will provide more airtime.

 

Hah! I guess my fingers were wandering, or I meant to describe old bananas.

 

How many rides in the world are there that you can leave your seat on? A tiny portion of rides with negative G's, I'd imagine. A handful of oldies like Phoenix, Gravity Group rides, three or four GCI's, only a few steels. Maybe more that I'm not thinking of. Very few being built this decade, even the high profile woodies use pneumatic restraints.

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Regardless of whether seat is touching you or not the force acting on you is the same. Negative force feels like negative force.. The only case where I can argue that this isn't the case is with floater airtime, in which case the only way to really sense that the airtime is taking place is when you lift out of your seat.

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Regardless of whether seat is touching you or not the force acting on you is the same. Negative force feels like negative force.. The only case where I can argue that this isn't the case is with floater airtime, in which case the only way to really sense that the airtime is taking place is when you lift out of your seat.

 

Exactly. You feel "weightless" whenever experiencing 0 G's or less, regardless of if youre "floating" or not. Also, I think a lot of psychological factors play into this whole floating sensation...you may *think* youre being lifted out of your seats on certain rides, but the fact is you aren't...youre just hitting your restraint with a lot more pressure than normal.

 

Bottom line, seatbelts are not going to change the negative G's Diamondback, Behemoth, Intimidatot, etc. pulls, therefore will have no affect on the feeling of "airtime" because your body will feel the same independent of how much space is between you and the lapbar. Its all in your guys' head

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Exactly. You feel "weightless" whenever experiencing 0 G's or less, regardless of if youre "floating" or not.

Once again, I suppose the definition is interpreted differently by different people.

For me, it's simple:

0 G = weightlessness

<0 G = airtime

That's it.

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Exactly. You feel "weightless" whenever experiencing 0 G's or less, regardless of if youre "floating" or not.

Once again, I suppose the definition is interpreted differently by different people.

For me, it's simple:

0 G = weightlessness

<0 G = airtime

That's it.

totaly agree , my opinion is when X is the "felt" force to you, then i am calling that:

-X = negative Gs

X = 0 ...weightlessness (like zero G roll )

1>X>0 ...air time

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Exactly. You feel "weightless" whenever experiencing 0 G's or less, regardless of if youre "floating" or not.

Once again, I suppose the definition is interpreted differently by different people.

For me, it's simple:

0 G = weightlessness

<0 G = airtime

That's it.

 

Right, but even so, a tighter lapbar or seabelts is not going to change the G-forces of the ride. If it at any point pulls less than 0 G's, no matter how tightly youre stapled into the seat youre going to feel weightless. So I think we are actually in agreement here, really. Seatbelts can not affect airtime.

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Exactly. You feel "weightless" whenever experiencing 0 G's or less, regardless of if youre "floating" or not.

Once again, I suppose the definition is interpreted differently by different people.

For me, it's simple:

0 G = weightlessness

<0 G = airtime

That's it.

 

Right, but even so, a tighter lapbar or seabelts is not going to change the G-forces of the ride. If it at any point pulls less than 0 G's, no matter how tightly youre stapled into the seat youre going to feel weightless. So I think we are actually in agreement here, really. Seatbelts can not affect airtime.

It's obviously not going to change the forces on the ride, but it can change what you feel drastically. For example, on gatekeeper's big airtime hill I know that there is some floater air there (not much less than 0 G) but I couldn't really feel it because I was glued to my seat.

When it comes to ejector air, it's a smaller difference but when we're talking about floater ( 0 to -0,5 Gs, more or less) it does make a difference.

But, to me, it doesn't affect what I consider airtime, just how you feel it.

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Forces (G's) are the forces you feel, regardless of whether you leave the seat or not. Airtime is a loose term for negative G's, but some of us define them different now because rides are built different now. You're body does move upward, but there isn't much "real airtime" when you are strapped tightly to your seat.

 

Until the debut of the PTC ratchet bar (Thunder Run at Kentucky Kingdom, I think), airtime was always the type where you popped out of your seat (but were held in the car safely by a higher restraint). There was never any stapling before that; restraints usually only went so far down.

 

Now we have rides were you must be stapled in for safety (Skyrush, El Toro, etc.). It's a good thing that we have those great rides, but the trade off is you have to be one with the seat. We also have plenty of coasters where you dont need to be stapled in, but are due to the newer restraints (I'm primarily thinking about the PTC ratchet bars, as well as the retractable locking seatbelts that Cedar Fair loves on their woodies. Those seat dividers restrict movement, too. But that is more about lateral forces.)

 

They're still good rides, it's just that some of us like to differentiate between the two types of airtime (or uplift force and airtime; we're not debating that the G's basically stay the same). Some people prefer to get that bounce out of the seat; some people don't care. It's all good.

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^ I was there today and very little work on Z. They were working like crazy last Sunday. Today being (finally) a beautiful day very little progress. Maybe they were off. They were laying more cement walk paths back to the ride, but I'm sure that's not what you were asking.

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Does El Toro really need track work? Wasn't Plug and Play supposed to be maintenance free?

 

Nothing is maintenance free my friend. In my opinion, El Toro did not need any track work. The ride is still nearly as smooth as when it first opened. Sure there's a few more bumps on it here and there but it's still smoother than most steel coasters I've ridden. Whatever the case, the park or Intamin probably thought this would be the best move.

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