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Kings Dominion (KD) Discussion Thread

P. 767: WinterFest Media Night Report

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Here's a pop quiz: Can you figure out the height of RMC Hurler?

 

The only info I will give you is that the height of the old Hurler is 83 feet, the angle of ascent on the old Hurler is 25 degrees, and the angle of ascent on RMC Hurler is 32 degrees.

According to this data, RMC Hurler should be around 111 feet, as long as the ground length of the lift remains the same.

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Oh sure, why not, I'll do your math homework for you.

 

Assuming the distance at ground level is staying the same, and assuming those angles are taken at ground level, then it comes to 112 feet.

 

Tan (25°) = 0.4663

Tan = o/a

.4663 = 83/a

a = 83/.4663

a = 179.15

 

Tan (32°) = 0.6249

Tan = o/a

.6249 = o/179.15

o = 179.15 (.6249)

o = 111.95

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How DARE you try to bring math into my coaster loving escapism hobby!

 

Roller coasters are basically physics, which is primarily math.

 

Example: You know what "Gs" actually mean? That's how many times the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 m/s^2 or 21.94 mph) the coaster will reach. It's NOT the same as velocity. The reason you get airtime is because you're getting the opposite; negative acceleration due to gravity.

 

One of the reasons why Skyrush is so fast despite the drop being smaller than many other hypercoasters is because the cable lift will already yield a higher amount of KE to add on to the existing drop. Conversely, of the reasons why dive coasters are always slower than hypers despite similar drops is because the amount of KE at the top is near zero thanks to the holding break.

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How DARE you try to bring math into my coaster loving escapism hobby!

 

Roller coasters are basically physics, which is primarily math.

 

Example: You know what "Gs" actually mean? That's how many times the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 m/s^2 or 21.94 mph) the coaster will reach. It's NOT the same as velocity. The reason you get airtime is because you're getting the opposite; negative acceleration due to gravity.

 

One of the reasons why Skyrush is so fast despite the drop being smaller than many other hypercoasters is because the cable lift will already yield a higher amount of KE to add on to the existing drop. Conversely, of the reasons why dive coasters are always slower than hypers despite similar drops is because the amount of KE at the top is near zero thanks to the holding break.

 

Please tell me you're not seriously trying to explain to me that roller coasters utilize physics, which is math??? Or questioning whether I know what "Gs" mean??? I'm just saying when I'm tooling around TPR looking for a good time enjoying my coaster hobby, figuring out math problems, no matter how significant or insignificant, is the last thing I'm looking to do!

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How DARE you try to bring math into my coaster loving escapism hobby!

 

Roller coasters are basically physics, which is primarily math.

 

Example: You know what "Gs" actually mean? That's how many times the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 m/s^2 or 21.94 mph) the coaster will reach. It's NOT the same as velocity. The reason you get airtime is because you're getting the opposite; negative acceleration due to gravity.

 

One of the reasons why Skyrush is so fast despite the drop being smaller than many other hypercoasters is because the cable lift will already yield a higher amount of KE to add on to the existing drop. Conversely, of the reasons why dive coasters are always slower than hypers despite similar drops is because the amount of KE at the top is near zero thanks to the holding break.

 

Please tell me you're not seriously trying to explain to me that roller coasters utilize physics, which is math??? Or questioning whether I know what "Gs" mean??? I'm just saying when I'm tooling around TPR looking for a good time enjoying my coaster hobby, figuring out math problems, no matter how significant or insignificant, is the last thing I'm looking to do!

 

What if I told you that it's scientifically possible for a 40 mph coaster to have a more forceful launch than a 100 mph coaster?

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But in all seriousness I think the RMC will be a bit taller than mathematically estimates because they'll probably extend the base a bit, reaching a height in the 115-120 range.

 

Still, that's tall enough to reach the skyline when you enter the park off I-95 as well as increase the speed of the ride (practically) to around 57-60 mph or so.

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Im guessing an overbank after the first drop instead of the current low to the ground turn around.

 

If you are going to use a photo from someone elses IG page can you at least give credit? Thanks!

 

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But in all seriousness I think the RMC will be a bit taller than mathematically estimates because they'll probably extend the base a bit, reaching a height in the 115-120 range.

 

Still, that's tall enough to reach the skyline when you enter the park off I-95 as well as increase the speed of the ride (practically) to around 57-60 mph or so.

That seems a good estimate. The 112 assumes that the lift begins on the ground, which it likely will not do. For comparison, Shivering Timbers is 122 feet, so a similar height is definitely enough speed to be exciting.

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How DARE you try to bring math into my coaster loving escapism hobby!

 

Roller coasters are basically physics, which is primarily math.

 

Example: You know what "Gs" actually mean? That's how many times the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 m/s^2 or 21.94 mph) the coaster will reach. It's NOT the same as velocity. The reason you get airtime is because you're getting the opposite; negative acceleration due to gravity.

 

One of the reasons why Skyrush is so fast despite the drop being smaller than many other hypercoasters is because the cable lift will already yield a higher amount of KE to add on to the existing drop. Conversely, of the reasons why dive coasters are always slower than hypers despite similar drops is because the amount of KE at the top is near zero thanks to the holding break.

 

Did this seriously just happen?

 

Don't get me wrong, I love the enthusiasm, but maybe 1% of TPR doesn't understand basic physics.

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How DARE you try to bring math into my coaster loving escapism hobby!

 

Roller coasters are basically physics, which is primarily math.

 

Example: You know what "Gs" actually mean? That's how many times the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 m/s^2 or 21.94 mph) the coaster will reach. It's NOT the same as velocity. The reason you get airtime is because you're getting the opposite; negative acceleration due to gravity.

 

One of the reasons why Skyrush is so fast despite the drop being smaller than many other hypercoasters is because the cable lift will already yield a higher amount of KE to add on to the existing drop. Conversely, of the reasons why dive coasters are always slower than hypers despite similar drops is because the amount of KE at the top is near zero thanks to the holding break.

 

Actually not a very good explanation. You get airtime because it lets you fall with the acceleration of gravity, or pulls you down even faster. If there wasn't normally gravity, airtime would be the norm. If there were still coasters, I guess we'd rave about the ones with the most gravity.

 

The speed of the lift has a minor effect on ride speed. Using a free fall calculator, a 10 MPH lift increases the theoretical max. speed from 77.35 MPH to 77.99 MPH, that's all*. But then, I didn't feel like there was anything faster about about Skyrush's drop than other hypers either, except being over quicker. The speed of the ride is due to to no other part going near as high so it never slows down.

 

* I can check this for conservation of energy easily, 10^2 + 77.35^2 = 77.99^2 . Since kinetic energy varies as velocity squared, 10 MPH just isn't much energy.

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How DARE you try to bring math into my coaster loving escapism hobby!

 

Roller coasters are basically physics, which is primarily math.

 

Example: You know what "Gs" actually mean? That's how many times the acceleration due to gravity (9.81 m/s^2 or 21.94 mph) the coaster will reach. It's NOT the same as velocity. The reason you get airtime is because you're getting the opposite; negative acceleration due to gravity.

 

One of the reasons why Skyrush is so fast despite the drop being smaller than many other hypercoasters is because the cable lift will already yield a higher amount of KE to add on to the existing drop. Conversely, of the reasons why dive coasters are always slower than hypers despite similar drops is because the amount of KE at the top is near zero thanks to the holding break.

 

Actually not a very good explanation. You get airtime because it lets you fall with the acceleration of gravity, or pulls you down even faster. If there wasn't normally gravity, airtime would be the norm. If there were still coasters, I guess we'd rave about the ones with the most gravity.

 

The speed of the lift has a minor effect on ride speed. Using a free fall calculator, a 10 MPH lift increases the theoretical max. speed from 77.35 MPH to 77.99 MPH, that's all*. But then, I didn't feel like there was anything faster about about Skyrush's drop than other hypers either, except being over quicker. The speed of the ride is due to to no other part going near as high so it never slows down.

 

* I can check this for conservation of energy easily, 10^2 + 77.35^2 = 77.99^2 . Since kinetic energy varies as velocity squared, 10 MPH just isn't much energy.

 

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You, of all people, want to mock someone's mathematical speculation for the crime that it was written with too much authority?

 

EDIT: Oh wait, I see. You're involved in that thread of quotes. It's personal now. You have to switch sides when it's personal, right? But wait - this post of yours was more BS. So now that it can be seen that you were of the essentially the same ideas the solution changes to hypocrisy, right?

 

ps — bill_s I don't think that of your post. I'm just saying that's AustrumSpark's intent.

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You, of all people, want to mock someone's mathematical speculation for the crime that it was written with too much authority?

 

EDIT: Oh wait, I see. You're involved in that thread of quotes. It's personal now. You have to switch sides when it's personal, right? But wait - this post of yours was more BS. So now that it can publicly be proven that you were of the same ideas the solution changes to hypocrisy, right?

 

ps — bill_s I don't think that of your post. I'm just saying that's AustrumSpark's intent.

 

Um that's not my intent. It was a joke. Stop acting offended for no reason.

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^^-- I got that he was saying pie on his face (probably). But it was a good enough segue to get in a slightly deeper.

 

One thing I wouldn't argue is that with a fast lift, if you change it but nothing else you will be able to feel the difference, even if the speed number change is small.

 

Another thing I didn't think about, in my example of a weightless environment coaster you can still get ejector airtime ( -G's), or is it then ejector gravity?

P.S. had to look to remember which thread this is.

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