Jump to content
  TPR Home | Parks | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Instagram 

SeaWorld Orlando (SWO) Discussion Thread

P. 266: Reef Plunge and more announced for Aquatica!

Recommended Posts

The thing about the activists are they are so unrealistic. These whales, even if SW were ever to close, would most likely NEVER be released into the ocean. They would most likely go to other parks throughout the world like Marineland Canada, Mundo Marino, Loro Parque, Marineland Canada, Sea World Kamogawa and perhaps other parks that would like to have Killer whales on display with no knowledge of how to care for them. SW closing would only complicate things.

 

 

Maybe the best option is to stop all further captivity of large creatures such as the whale? I like how the article put it, It's a big bathtub. It'd be like enclosing you inside a mansion all of your life. Sure, it's big, sure you can get your exercise and survive, but give it a while and you will go insane. That's just my humble opinion and I respect everyone's viewpoints on the subject,

But your opinion isn't factual or have any substance at all. In short, you SHOULDN'T be allowed to have an opinion on this because it's clear you don't even know what you are talking about!!!

 

There hasn't been any captivity of these creatures in over 40 years. The tanks aren't "bathubs", don't be stupid, they are plenty big to house the animals, they are some of the biggest in the world, and they are only going to get bigger.

 

It really bothers me that people watch a "movie", one that was slanted towards an agenda, and then think they can stand on their soapbox and preach about how much room a whale needs or how to solve the problems.

Edited by robbalvey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Maybe the best option is to stop all further captivity of large creatures such as the whale? I like how the article put it, It's a big bathtub. It'd be like enclosing you inside a mansion all of your life. Sure, it's big, sure you can get your exercise and survive, but give it a while and you will go insane. That's just my humble opinion and I respect everyone's viewpoints on the subject,

 

 

The best option to accomplish what? The gargantuan loss of public awareness of orcas and by extension marine life in the ocean as well? Videos on the internet can never and will never replace the experience of seeing these creatures live and close up. No whale watching trip will ever be able to duplicate that experience. If orcas were not visible at SeaWorld, it would make for a huge loss in public education, connection, and awareness of marine life. How many marine biologists are there today who would instead have gone into other professions had they not had childhood experiences at SeaWorld? How many marine animals have been rescued and nurtured back to health by adults who chose that profession or hobby because of having been able to see and make contact with marine life instead of just looking at pictures or YouTube videos? The gains that are made by SeaWorld and the orcas in their shows go far beyond the shows themselves, but all some people see are walls and fences.

 

Moreover your comparison crashes against the rocky shores of reality. Most of the orcas at SeaWorld did not come from the ocean, but were born and bred at SeaWorld. They live far less dangerous and much healthier lives than they ever could in the wild. It's not perfect, but it isn't like living in a bathtub all your life at all. But if you insist on making that comparison, remember than while you might go insane in that mansion, you'd also die if you were unexpectedly forced out of it one day. While you might not be a big fan of captivity, I'm sure you're much less of a fan of the idea of killing these orcas by setting them "free" in the wild.

 

Activists should be praising SeaWorld for all the good they have done for marine life in their history. They really have no idea how much they are cutting off their nose to spite their face by attacking Sea World, to say nothing of the outright lies and deceit that the propaganda piece "Blackfish" is overflowing with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't really think about it until I looked from above on Google maps, but there's actually a TON of room for them to do this expansion at SWO.

 

-It really shouldn't affect Happy Harbor, Wild Arctic, or the existing stadium. Even the Dine with Shamu area doesn't really need to be changed.

-There is a path running behind the stadium currently, but it is a seldom-used pathway as it is with only the Shamu viewing area between the park bridge and Happy Harbor along that path.

-The area between the Nautilus Theater and the Shamu Stadium is dead as it is, this will completely transform the path along that pond from the deadest spot in the park to maybe the biggest draw.

-That pond is already partially dug out, saving on costs if they choose to use this entire area, though there is some existing elevation change there.

-On the other side of the path, where Terrace and the Sea Garden currently are can still easily be converted into new attractions, and I've heard from good sources that this is an area of focus in the near future.

568414068_ShamuExpansion.thumb.png.183c9f5735fd57b822c0416a8d1d9bde.png

If you click the Image you can see an Orca in the back pool, for size comparison to how large SWO can actually go here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/travel/attractions/os-seaworld-ceo-jim-atchison-20140819,0,373725.story

 

Bvh0C7qIcAAWB_S.jpg-large.jpeg.be375d6d7119826da0d632b8ad12e53e.jpeg

SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. should have done more to counter the anti-captivity documentary "Blackfish" and in the future will promote its rescue and conservation efforts more aggressively, Chief Executive Officer Jim Atchison said Wednesday.

 

In a wide-ranging interview with the Orlando Sentinel, Atchison also discussed the public pressure his Orlando-based company has been under. Last week, SeaWorld stock plunged 33 percent after a weak earnings report, and the company announced that it would nearly double the size of killer-whale habitats at its three SeaWorld parks.

 

Here are excerpts from the interview, which has been edited and condensed:

 

In hindsight, do you wish you had come out more forcefully, sooner, against "Blackfish"?

 

In hindsight, yeah, we probably do, because the movie was so misleading, so full of falsehoods and so unfair in its framing and characterizing of what we do and how we do it and even our history. It's a delicate balance, though, because one of the worst things you can do is to turn it into the movie SeaWorld doesn't want you to see. Reacting too early to it might have made it more newsworthy, made it more of a marketing endeavor.

 

Some people might look at the new whale habitat you have announced and see that as sort of a concession that what you have now for the whales is not ideal.

 

You know, I recognize that. There's probably little we can do or say to kind of unwind that. We've kind of recognized that's just something we have to kind of accept and deal with and people are going to say that. The reality is, we conceived of these habitats before "Blackfish" was ever created. ... Our first drawings go back to 2010, so it's hard to call it a reaction to that when the reality is we started work before that. We're going to continue to kind of evolve what we do, just as everyone in society should.

 

These won't open for another few years. Is there a concern you need the benefit of these from a public-relations standpoint earlier?

 

We're not building these pools, these projects, for that purpose. We're building them because we want to make sure we continue to evolve and create a dynamic environment for the animals we care for and an equally dynamic environment for the guests to connect with it. At the end of the day, we're focused on doing it right as well — really building something remarkable and special.

 

Are there any concerns you are making these huge investments and you may be facing a shift in public opinion, where more mainstream people don't feel comfortable with the idea of whales in captivity, period?

 

We don't feel that way. Our view is that there's probably never been a more important time to connect people with animals than now. Here's some perspective: 130 species go extinct every day on this planet — 130 today, 130 tomorrow, 130 the next day. Our view is, I think to maybe rephrase your question, has the time for zoos and aquariums passed? I don't know about all zoos and aquariums, but it's never been more important for us to do what we do right now. The world gets more and more and more complicated with respect to population growth and the imperiled environment and the wild. Heightened sensitivity around animals or environmental causes, we don't think that's inconsistent with what we do. We think that's a great benefit to what we do.

 

But do you see the tide changing? Do you see more people in the mainstream feeling uncomfortable with SeaWorld having whales in captivity?

 

No. I don't. There will be efforts, there will be propaganda, there will be messaging about trying to get people there, but we have a beloved brand.

 

So what happened in California during the last quarter, then? [Attendance was weak at the San Diego park, which SeaWorld attributed partly to news coverage of state legislation regarding animals in captivity.]

 

Really, the amount of media attention associated with that bill really started to just affect the demand around the park for that period of time, and that's what created a problem for us. Ironically, we ended up having a terrific year last year, led by the SeaWorld-branded parks and through any matters you want to attribute to intensity of coverage last year, our SeaWorld parks led record performance and we had a record fourth quarter …What really hurt us in San Diego was just the intensity of the news cycle around that bill.

 

Do you think those people who stopped visiting in California are going to come back, and how are you going to get them back?

 

Well, that's our job, and I wish I could open a door and figure it out and have them all there tomorrow. Yes, I do think we'll get them back. We have an enormity of repeat visitors in our parks, and so I think some people who may have just put off a visit for any number of reasons — maybe they just wanted to do something else that year or they decided that it wasn't that they didn't like us anymore, they just wanted to try something different and new. I think they'll find a way back to us as we continue to innovate our parks and our messaging and the offerings we have. I'm not worried about our long-term ability to kind of [lure back those visitors]. I think it's just our job to figure out how to keep doing that.

 

You're looking toward international growth. Will you be opening parks such as Discovery Cove or will there be more SeaWorlds?

 

Or it could be something else, right? I don't mean to be coy about it. But our discussions involve those brands. It also involves new concepts that we have in mind … that are different from what we do today.

 

Where would you get the whales if you open more SeaWorld parks?

 

We haven't collected whales since the '70s. We're fortunate to have a successful, thriving breeding program within our parks. We certainly have those capabilities with our current collection of killer whales.

 

So would they come just from your current collection?

 

In all likelihood, yes. We don't collect whales in the wild and we have 29 whales in our care, so we certainly have the resources to develop and build more parks as it sits.

 

There has been news about some captures of whales in Russia. Could any of those end up in some of your parks?

 

I've got to tell you, the news on all that is pretty sketchy…we actually probably don't know a lot more than you about it. We have no formal, official knowledge around it. There's a lot of speculation, a lot of rumor of what's been done. What I have heard through that rumor, through that speculation, through those media reports appalls me. I hope none of it's true. ... I would have no interest in .. any animals that were brought in that fashion.

 

Why did you decide not to further pursue an appeal of the federal OSHA citation that keeps trainers from performing in the water with whales? [The citation followed the 2010 death of trainer Dawn Brancheau.]

 

We didn't agree with it, and it had more to do with our reputation and our brand. The removal of our trainers from the water we did voluntarily [before the citation was issued]. It was more a matter to set history straight, if you will, so in that respect, the analysis we looked at was: Does it make sense to appeal this further? It doesn't. It doesn't change our business model.

 

But having the whales and trainers performing together — that was a big part of your brand, right? You've said as much in legal filings.

 

It's certainly part of our history — how we've exhibited and connected people to these animals before. We realize when we voluntarily moved away from that in 2010, it was a historical and kind of quintessential part of the SeaWorld experience for a long time, but ... we felt like we were still doing a great job connecting people with these amazing animals in ways that were still moving and inspiring and commercially viable.

 

So you won't have trainers performing in the water with whales anymore. Now you will have new whale habitats with natural settings and these awe-inspiring views of whales just swimming. Does this represent a shift in direction for SeaWorld?

 

I wouldn't say a shift. We are constantly, constructively restless about the care we have with our animals. We always want to get better. We always want to move and improve and raise the bar. We really think getting people more connected with animals is good for everybody. This is a different way to do it. …We'll still have shows in our park, although those evolve and change over time, too. This will just be a new and different way to connect with those animals.

 

You have talked about wanting to ramp up communications to protect your brand and counter media attention on Blackfish and legislation as a result of that. How are you going to do that?

 

Whether we feel that attacks on our brand and business model and what we do and how we do it are unfounded or unfair … we can't change that. What we have to do is do a better job of telling our story. We have to do a better job of sharing the good work we do every day, our massive efforts in animal rescue programs ... sharing those efforts, sharing how we can work with the scientific community to do amazing research with animals in our care because you just can't do them in the wild. You can't do a study of the metabolic rate of killer whales in the wild because ... you can't collect their exhaust when they exhale. There's things we can only do because we have animals in our care. So it's important for us to share those rescue efforts, those research efforts, those conservation efforts, the enormity of work and the millions of dollars we've spent on conservation around the world. Not just marine animals but all kinds of animals.

Edited by jedimaster1227
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Maybe the best option is to stop all further captivity of large creatures such as the whale? I like how the article put it, It's a big bathtub. It'd be like enclosing you inside a mansion all of your life. Sure, it's big, sure you can get your exercise and survive, but give it a while and you will go insane. That's just my humble opinion and I respect everyone's viewpoints on the subject,

 

 

So I am guessing you do not go to any SeaWorld park? or Disney, Six flags, Dollywood, Hershey park, heck even Universal for that matter.

A bunch of Animals died at Disney Animal Kingdom the first year it opened, and nobody made a movie about it.

People seem too sensitive towards whales, but not any other animals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cetacean-captivity on Tumblr made a diagram of a potential new stadium complex for SWO.

 

 

I personally think this would be awesome. Clearly by the image this would be a huge job because not only would they have to build it, but completely drain and fill in the one side of the lake. The plus is, this gives them way more land to use and would finally get rid of that long awkward boardwalk-bridge to get to the one side of the park. It would also definitely help balance the park out a lot. Obviously the dolphins would take over the current Shamu stadium, a full blown Blue Horizons set would be amazing in that stadium. So they could demolish the current dolphin stadium, or even use it for something else but I don't think the sea lions need that much water since most of their behaviors are on land.

 

Maybe a new coaster? A second chance at a dark ride? Expansion of the dolphin cove?

 

It's so much fun to imagine stuff like this, especially since this probably won't happen. There is hope though! They did say that the Blue World project at Orlando was a new addition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I spent the day at SeaWorld Orlando on Friday and had a few thoughts to share.

 

First off the place was packed, I was expecting light crowds for a weekday in the "off season" but all of the shows were full, most of the rides had a wait. Manta and Kraken were 10-15 minutes when I rode but Antartica was 30-45 minutes all day. Not sure if this was because of $55 weekday tickets or not but it was nice to see the park stil drawing decent crowds.

 

Finally got to experience Antartica, and uh yeah, it was about as average as I was expecting. I really really wanted to like the ride but it just didn't work. Couldn't follow the story, the ride vehicles are so cool but do so little, overall it was just meh. It's a shame the ride was so uneventful because the rest of the section is nice, i mean REALLY nice. The animal viewing area, the dining space, the restaurant, the themeing in the que line and rest of the section. Everything looked great but the ride was a bit disappointing.

Also, I'm not one to complain very often about operations, but when were were grouped in Antarctica I was with my wife and my 2 year old and we were directed to pod 4 of the "Mild" version of the ride with another group of three and a group of 2. So our party got split up and I filled the empty single space in the front row while my wife and daughter sat in the back row, and a A 2 year old in the second row couldn't see a thing the whole ride. So yeah, for a "family" attraction seems like they could do a better job grouping the families together.

 

Friday was also the first time I had a chance to see the new One Ocean Shamu show, it was fine but not as good as Believe used to be. Blue Horizons is still my favorite show in the park.

 

Another note, I noticed in a few different places SeaWorld was kind of going out of their way to mention their conservation efforts and their animal rescue operations, which is fine but it almost felt forced a bit. In the pet show, I remember that they used to bring out a dog for a few tricks and mention he was a rescue and encourage the audience to rescue pets, but Friday they said that every animal in the show was a rescue. If that is true it's great but I hope it is not an embellishment of the truth for the sake of appeal. Also, they had a few miniature horses in the gardens section near the old brewery that before we could get the viewing area the attendant was telling the story of how these horses were pets that were abandoned and SeaWorld rescued them. Again, I hope that is true but either way it felt a bit forced. Do it because it's the right thing to do, not because you have to do it so you can promote yourself for doing it.

 

Overall we had a great day, SeaWorld is still a very nice park. Kraken is still a beast of a steel coaster, Manta is a nice flyer (I forgot how nasty that pretzel loop can be), Antartica is a beautiful section with a below average ride, and the animal exhibits are still very well done. Take advantage of the $55 weekday tickets while you still can!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^Thanks for the mini TR on your day at SWO. Too bad about Antarctica being a letdown. I haven't been to SWO in over a decade but the two times I visited I really loved it. I'm an animal lover but them making a big deal about every animal being a rescue is overdoing it and most likely not true. I understand their reasoning in doing so. I talked at length with an animal trainer at BGW one time about their animals and they confirmed that there are quite a few bred in house but a few, such as one of the dogs, a couple cats, and a potbellied pig, were rescues. (I'd love to see SWO try to explain how their captive-bred orcas are rescues LOL.)

 

I can't wait until I can get back down to Florida to see how the place as changed. Overall they do a lot of good with educating the public and rehabbing injured animals. If they didn't exist there would be a giant hole in what we as the general public would know about important and very large oceanic animals. There would most certainly be more extraordinarily tiny stadiums taking absolutely terrible care of their orcas, dolphins, sea lions, etc. but because of SW more people are educated and therefore a lot of those places probably make efforts to improve the living and dietary conditions. On the whole, if a small percentage of captive animals can teach people about wild animals and how to keep the oceans thriving then it is greatly beneficial.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another note, I noticed in a few different places SeaWorld was kind of going out of their way to mention their conservation efforts and their animal rescue operations, which is fine but it almost felt forced a bit. In the pet show, I remember that they used to bring out a dog for a few tricks and mention he was a rescue and encourage the audience to rescue pets, but Friday they said that every animal in the show was a rescue. If that is true it's great but I hope it is not an embellishment of the truth for the sake of appeal. Also, they had a few miniature horses in the gardens section near the old brewery that before we could get the viewing area the attendant was telling the story of how these horses were pets that were abandoned and SeaWorld rescued them. Again, I hope that is true but either way it felt a bit forced. Do it because it's the right thing to do, not because you have to do it so you can promote yourself for doing it.

 

That's not really anything new or different for SeaWorld. They've always touted their rescue and conservation efforts to their audience.

 

There's really no way they can mention it without it feeling at least a bit forced and self-promotional. But to some extent they have to do that, especially with the lunatic fringe out there that will create BS like Blackfish. SeaWorld itself has the loudest voice and the biggest spotlight to draw attention to the good that they do. Can't really blame them for using it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

There's a pretty awesome program called "Building Penguin Paradise" on Nat Geo Wild right now. It's an hour long special on the building of SeaWorld Orlando's Antarctica: Empire of the Penguin area. So far it has been very detailed on the planning, design, and building of the new area, as well as tying the design in with the needs of penguins and the trackless ride system.

 

Unfortunately my guide says there are no scheduled re-airings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

SeaWorld Shares Tumble on Lower Earnings

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-11-12/seaworld-entertainment-profit-falls-more-than-estimates.html

 

SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. (SEAS) slid to a record low after third-quarter results fell more than analysts estimated, hurt by shrinking attendance at its parks during the peak season.

 

SeaWorld, criticized by animal-rights groups over its use of killer whales in shows, slumped 9.4 percent to $16.85 in New York, its lowest closing value since the shares began trading in April 2013. The stock plunged 33 percent on Aug. 13 after the company posted lower sales and acknowledged the growing impact of the protests.

 

The theme-park operator attracted 8.4 million visitors in the quarter, a half million less than a year earlier. The decline for the period, typically the biggest of the year for SeaWorld, underscored the impact of “Blackfish,” a critical documentary about its performing orcas. Three airlines have cut ties to the company in recent months.

 

“The decline resulted from a combination of factors, including negative media attention in California, along with the challenging competitive environment, particularly in Florida,” Chief Financial Officer James Heaney said on a conference call today.

 

Earnings excluding some items shrank to $1.01 a share, Orlando, Florida-based SeaWorld said today in a statement. The per-share results missed the $1.13 average of analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Revenue fell to $495.8 million, missing projections of $496.4 million.

 

Private Equity

Third-quarter net income declined 28 percent to $87.2 million from $120.7 million a year earlier, SeaWorld said.

 

“Our current estimates for SeaWorld are under review,” Robert Fishman, an analyst at MoffettNathanson LLC in New York, said in a research note today. “The stock is a show me story whether 2015 top line results can rebound off this year’s depressed levels.” He rates the stock a buy.

 

SeaWorld, which had been owned by the private-equity firm Blackstone Group LP (BX), went public in April 2013, selling shares at $27 each. Blackstone continues to own 22 percent of the company, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

 

The company, which operates 11 theme parks, said in August it would build new, larger habitats for the animals, with the first set to open in San Diego in 2018.

 

Still Opposed

That plan hasn’t changed the view of animal-rights groups opposed to captive breeding of the whales or their use in shows.

 

“Unless and until SeaWorld ends its orca breeding program and ceases its exploitation of orcas for entertainment purposes, AWI believes the whales at SeaWorld will continue to suffer,” Naomi Rose, a marine mammal scientist with the Washington-based group Animal Welfare Institute, said in an August e-mail.

 

The company hired outside advisers to help develop a $50 million cost-reduction plan, SeaWorld Chief Executive Officer Jim Atchison said on the call. The reductions, which will begin this quarter, are focused on centralizing administrative and support functions and will not affect guests or employee safety, he said.

 

SeaWorld will divert some of the savings, about $10 million next year, into increased marketing for its namesake parks that have seen weaker attendance. The company also increasing capital spending by as much as $30 million, some of that focused on the larger habitats for the killer whales.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know about the rest of you, but to me it really seems like the biggest mistake SeaWorld is making lately is how much they are promoting their rescue, care and conservation for their animals and orcas.

 

Look, SeaWorld, we get it...Blackfish was a load of crap and anyone who isn't a pro-peta activist knows this. We realize this was a huge upset and people are making claims that aren't true, and you guys are fully in the right to defend yourself. We support that. But you guys are a THEME PARK and you need to start acting like one again! Instead of constantly tweeting about your new orca habitats coming in 2018 or whenever, how about tweeting about how awesome your Manta roller coaster is? Or how much fun your dolphin show is? Or how cool it is to hang out with your family at your theme parks?

 

If you look at SeaWorld's Twitter feed over the last few months, you would have NO IDEA AT ALL that they were a theme park, and instead you'd think they are some sort of animal conservation group, and that's ALL they are. I feel like SeaWorld has completely lost touch with the fact that they are a theme park and their recent message totally reflects this.

 

Remember "Sea of Surprises?" Yeah, neither do we! This was supposed to be their huge 2014 promotion. When was the last time they promoted it?

 

Look, I love SeaWorld and I 100% stand by them. But they need to remember what they are and get back to those roots. Quickly!

Edited by robbalvey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know about the rest of you, but to me it really seems like the biggest mistake SeaWorld is making lately is how much they are promoting their rescue, care and conservation for their animals and orcas.

 

Look, SeaWorld, we get it...Blackfish was a load of crap and anyone who isn't a pro-peta activist knows this. We realize this was a huge upset and people are making claims that aren't true, and you guys are fully in the right to defend yourself. We support that. But you guys are a THEME PARK and you need to start acting like one again! Instead of constantly tweeting about your new orca habitats coming in 2018 or whenever, how about tweeting about how awesome your Manta roller coaster is? Or how much fun your dolphin show is? Or how cool it is to hang out with your family at your theme parks?

 

If you look at SeaWorld's Twitter feed over the last few months, you would have NO IDEA AT ALL that they were a theme park, and instead you'd think they are some sort of animal conservation group, and that's ALL they are. I feel like SeaWorld has completely lost touch with the fact that they are a theme park and their recent message totally reflects this.

 

Remember "Sea of Surprises?" Yeah, neither do we! This was supposed to be their huge 2014 promotion. When was the last time they promoted it?

 

Look, I love SeaWorld and I 100% stand by them. But they need to remember what they are and get back to those roots. Quickly!

 

That's a really good point. People's minds are already made up if they're pro-Blackfish and anti-SeaWorld…no amount of promotion by the park will change their minds. They may as well stop trying to defend themselves on that front and market themselves as a theme park rather than a conservation/research facility. People are going to be adamant on their views about the animals in captivity, but it's hard to have such an opinion on roller coasters. Although they may find it hard to justify, a big new investment in a ride that does not feature animals would be a big step in the right direction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This. I understand that the park is trying to counteract the bad press by promoting their conservation and research efforts, put they won't be able to continue if the parks don't do well. There are very few people that animal rights activists, most people don't care about it, but those few are very loud. SeaWorld does some great things, heck most people have never seen an orca before going to the park, but they are a theme park and need to focus on that because that is what is going to bring the guests in, not rescuing another seal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The major question is will they ever make the effort to build new attractions at the destination SeaWorld parks?

We should be over Blackfish by now. Honestly, just like Kony, like SuperSize Me, etc. all things die out eventually. Unfortunately, by upsetting the pot, SeaWorld is trying to defend themselves instead of focusing on their parks.

For example, remember the "Rosa" incident at Six Flags? Everybody forgot about that and now they're operating normally.

Unfortunately, SeaWorld has chosen not to add attractions and has not disregarded the controversy, which is probably the reason why activists think they're an easy target.

Like Rob said, they're A THEME PARK, not an aquarium. They can operate normally had they chosen to focus on more desirable factors such as a Rollercoaster

 

I will continue to support SeaWorld/Busch Gardens, but something needs to change. And Fast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I totally agree. The Orlando news is also citing one of the main reasons for the decline is that the Universal and Disney parks have major TV channels behind them and basically get all the free advertising they want.

 

Luckily, TV commercials are becoming less and less important to companies' advertising/marketing strategies. So if SeaWorld really tries, and invests in something substantial to promote, they can be successful. It will take a lot of work and money, but at the rate they're going that's probably their only option.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use https://themeparkreview.com/forum/topic/116-terms-of-service-please-read/