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Kennywood (KW) Discussion Thread

P. 157: Kangaroo returning for the 2022 season!

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This company is going to put such a squeeze on the Kennywood parks that eventually service is going to fall and then everything that comes with it. Mark my words, yes the same management will be in place but they will be put in positions where it's almost impossible for them to run their parks the way they have been and should be. This company exemplifies corporate America. They're gonna demand blood from a stone.

 

How does a Spanish company exemplify corporate America?

 

Despite his problems with semantics, he is more or less on point. The Spaniards didn't buy Kennywood out of an appreciation for the rich, carefully preserved history behind the park. They bought Kennywood to make a buck. And, as others have said here, big corporate efforts to maximize the performance of smaller parks usually wind up ruining everything that was great about the park.

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Is it just me? It seems as though the current generation of the family are out to make a quick buck instead of having to put years of hard work into making money like their parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc. before them had done. Its like these people who try to get their parents commited so they can get their hands on their inhertance earlier! I think that this sale is the current family slapping all of their ancestors squarely in the face.

 

It's just you.

 

It is a business deal plan and simple. You just don't happen to like the fact the park may change, none of us do. It is pretty childish to expect this to continue as a family business and deny the owners a chance to make a lot of money on the sale.

 

I'm sure that if someone offered you a few million for your house you would turn it down if your neigbors didn't want you to move.

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Parque Reunidos have already bought a large number of parks in Europe, most noticeably Bobbejaanland and Mirabilandia, and none of them has lost their charm nor identity. Parque Reunidos just wants the money to get in and don't care about global expansion plans, uniformization, massive investment or whatsoever. Each park does it the way it choses to.

 

Contrary for example to the "Compagnie des Alpes" which bought out all the walibi parks and quite a few others, and on which there is no investment, and where they put one general manager for three parks!

 

Believe me, from what we saw in Europe, Parque Reunidos definitely is the corporate that gives most freedom to their parks (if they ever take any, by the way). It's as if the parks were still independent, but the money simply goes elsewhere. Of course any sale of a park to a corporate, is no good news, but Kennywood was clearly lucky that it was Parque Reunidos instaead of SF, Cedar Fair, Merlin, Compagnie des Alpes, or any other one.

 

And once again, when Mirabilandia in Europe got sold to them, the fans were all bragging it was the end, the park wouldn't ever be the same, it was scandalous, a petition should be made etc etc. Well nothing has changed since. Investment are made on the same rate as before with the same spirit as before. I'd suggest you wait to see how the park evolves, before doing any criticizing, because you could very well see no change at all

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It's just you.

 

It is a business deal plan and simple. You just don't happen to like the fact the park may change, none of us do. It is pretty childish to expect this to continue as a family business and deny the owners a chance to make a lot of money on the sale.

 

I'm sure that if someone offered you a few million for your house you would turn it down if your neigbors didn't want you to move.

 

I wouldn't sell it if it had been in my family for over 100 years!

 

PS: Oh and thank you for telling me that I am childish for having an opinion- I needed a good laugh during Finals week.

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My home park, known for it's charm, Voted #2 best kid's park, home to the world's only Vekoma Mouse(Ok, maybe THAT's not the best thing...),

 

I thought that mouse was the best thing at Idlewild. Made the trip out there worthwhile to me.

 

I don't like this purchase either. Although hopefully I won't notice any difference.

 

Or on the bright side, maybe they'll staff the park with lots of Spanish women.

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Or on the bright side, maybe they'll staff the park with lots of Spanish women.

 

Highly doubt any Spanish woman will come to America to work at an amusement park. At least the pretty ones. lol.

 

Ok everybody get over it. Yes they were bought. oh well what can you do. moving on...

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Bring on the reversing log flumes. The US needs one.

 

Although I love Kennywood, but I will reserve judgment until further notice.

 

I mean the old regime changed Old Mill to Garfield and got rid of the GoldRusher (among other recent changes).

 

So let's be careful and remember that the old Kennywood was not above making changes that pissed off many enthusiasts opposed to change.

 

I'm glad I'm not the only one who felt this way. While this isn't exciting, this isn't the end of Kennywood and it's charm.

 

I think Idlewild probably has the most to lose out of the K-Ent parks being acquired. Hopefully they don't plop any massive rides in there.

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This news makes me want to vomit.

 

I just hope that future trips to the park aren't filled with changes that triggers statements that begin with, "Things were better when..." I don't want to spend a day at KW only pointlessly yearning for the days of old. That would be a terrible day at the park.

 

Although I haven't been too happy with the last couple ride additions, I don't think they need a B&M at all...they need NEW wood.

 

 

Here's to hoping for a bright future for KW. [phil raises his thumb]

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Who would have thought the group that owns Boomers would buy Kennywood it's a huge shock!

 

Parque Reunidos just wants the money to get in and don't care about global expansion plans, uniformization, massive investment or whatsoever. Each park does it the way it choses to.

 

I really agree with olimonn's point, whether you like or dislike Parques Reunidos existing collection of theme parks you can't deny that they are all individual, since acquiring its current parks it hasn't tried to make them the same or install the same rides, therefore I don't think we have to be too worried about the new owners destroying any of Kennywoods charm or originality

 

This is because Parques Reunidos realises the importance of the local knowledge and will leave the existing management team to carry on what they were already doing, as it has with their other attractions

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I feel like I have to attend a funeral now. I worked at this park, I spent every summer in the first 21 years of my life in this park. I'm so sad.

 

But you know, we COULD have seen this coming, and here is why...

 

Remember that huge expansion they announced a while back? It was based on the completion of an agreed design of the Mon Valley expressway. Those plans failed this year. The family probably thought "there's nothing more we can do with Kennywood..." and just let it go. Even though they have other parks, Kennywood is the ONE that matters most. And other than it's endless rotation of new rides, what else could they really do?

 

Kennywood has been on the same-size plot of land for most of it's 100+ year history. This new company may have the resources needed to make those expansion plans a reality anyway.

 

And as far as "a quick buck", Henny is no spring chicken. LOL. If it was about a quick buck, they could have sold years ago.

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Can I ask a stupid question?

 

I'm not as into the coaster thing as I used to be but... what's the big deal? Nobody is going to turn it into condos, nobody is changing anything next year, they said that they were going to keep everything the same (and why not if it's profitable?)

 

This seems like a minor news story and if you didn't hear about it, you probably wouldn't even notice a difference at the park.

 

Did I miss something?

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Can I ask a stupid question?

 

I'm not as into the coaster thing as I used to be but... what's the big deal? Nobody is going to turn it into condos, nobody is changing anything next year, they said that they were going to keep everything the same (and why not if it's profitable?)

 

This seems like a minor news story and if you didn't hear about it, you probably wouldn't even notice a difference at the park.

 

Did I miss something?

 

The big deal is the new owners could ruin the charm of Kennywood in an attempt to turn it into something that it never will be, a big corporate park.

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Here is an article in the Connecticut papers that may comfort some of the uneasy. This one focuses more on Lake Compounce, but i am sure the same applies to Kennywood as well as the other aqusitions.

 

Compounce Changing Hands

Spanish Firm Taking Over

By DON STACOM | Courant Staff Writer

BRISTOL —

 

A Spanish firm is buying the parent company of Lake Compounce, but visitors won't notice anything different next season, managers of the 161-year-old amusement park said Tuesday.

 

Madrid-based Parques Reunidos announced that it intends in March to complete its purchase of Kennywood Entertainment's five amusement and water parks for an undisclosed sum.

 

If so, it will be the first time Lake Compounce, America's oldest continuously operating amusement park, will be held by a foreign owner.

 

Parques Reunidos is a Spanish park management company that is controlled by the massive British private equity firm Candover.

 

Lake Compounce fans shouldn't worry that the sale will bring cutbacks or corporate-mandated changes, said Jerry Brick, Lake Compounce's general manager.

 

"We're talking about a very strong company. They've seen our financials; they understand our plan," Brick said. "They own and operate parks, and they understand it takes capital to make it work."

 

Peter McAneny, president of Pittsburgh-based Kennywood, said Tuesday that Parques Reunidos' financial power might even speed up the long-term, multimillion-dollar expansion of Lake Compounce's water park.

 

"They're big and they have a lot of cash. We have to expand the water park, and that's going to be expensive," McAneny said. "Maybe I can convince them to build it a little quicker."

 

Lake Compounce came close to closing several times in the 1980s and early 1990s as it was passed among a series of owners. But it has thrived since its acquisition in 1996 by Kennywood, a company that promoted a family atmosphere, clean grounds and attractive landscaping rather than the teen-oriented thrill rides that competitors such as Six Flags emphasized.

 

That won't change, Brick said.

 

"If you look at their other parks, they're all unique. This company wants to let us stay with what our vision is," Brick said.

 

Lake Compounce employs just under 50 full-time workers and about 1,300 seasonal employees, mostly teenagers from around central Connecticut. Brick said that isn't expected to change either.

 

Parques Reunidos operates nearly 30 parks and attractions in Europe, including an aquarium in Valencia, Spain, and the Madrid Zoo.

 

Earlier this year, the company moved into the U.S. market with a deal to buy Palace Entertainment's 33 water parks and family recreation centers for about $330 million.

 

Along with Lake Compounce, the Kennywood sale includes three Pittsburgh-area parks — Kennywood, Idlewild & Soak Zone, and Sandcastle — and Story Land in Glen, N.H.

 

Members of the Henninger and McSwigan families have owned the Kennywood business since 1906. Its flagship operation, Kennywood park, is a National Historic Landmark and a destination for roller coaster enthusiasts. The comedy "Adventureland," directed by Greg Mottola of "Superbad" fame, was recently filmed on the site.

 

"The Kennywood experience — as visitors have come to love and expect — will continue," said Harry Henninger, the company's chairman. "Nothing will seem different, even to the folks working at the parks. Existing management will remain in place."

 

Kennywood has held acquisition talks with other amusement park operators in recent years, "but Parques Reunidos is the first one to share our vision and philosophy," he said in a statement. "This has been a very difficult decision for members of the founding families, now numbering over 100 and residing all over the country."

 

Last year, a Kennywood representative said the company had grown into a business of $80 million to $120 million annually.

 

After the sale, Parques Reunidos will operate 65 amusement, animal and water parks in the U.S. and Europe. Kennywood said the Spanish company's annual revenues exceed $570 million.

 

http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-ctbricompounce1212.artdec12,0,5300659.story

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Can I ask a stupid question?

 

I'm not as into the coaster thing as I used to be but... what's the big deal? Nobody is going to turn it into condos, nobody is changing anything next year, they said that they were going to keep everything the same (and why not if it's profitable?)

 

This seems like a minor news story and if you didn't hear about it, you probably wouldn't even notice a difference at the park.

 

Did I miss something?

 

Do you believe everything corporate America tells you? You're right, it's not being turned into condos right away. But can you gaurantee that in the future? All most of us are doing is expressing our skepticism based on previous realities dealing with major corporate lies and empty promises over various periods of time. Do I think Kennywood, LC, etc., are doomed? Not exactly. But I'm still uneasy about the sale.

 

Heck, Michael Eisner was once thought of as a savior for Disney. Everything can go bad.

 

 

Scott "still waiting for that Enron stock to take off" B.

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Here is another article i came across with some more information in terms of Lake Compounce.

 

Lake Compounce sold along with Kennywood

 

Lake Compounce, the nation's oldest amusement park, is changing hands again.

Parques Reunidos, the largest European-based amusement park company, is buying out Lake Compounce's parent company, Pittsburgh's Kennywood Entertainment Co.

The Madrid-based Parques Reunidos has vowed to "continue what we've already started," said Gerry Brick, general manager at Lake Compounce.

"They do like what we do. They're going to keep us going," said Brick. "Our goal is the same. It's still going to start with the guest service."

Lake Compounce , which was founded and run by the Norton family from 1846 until 1985, had a series of owners between the Nortons and Kennywood, which bought the mortgage notes in 1996.

After the Nortons sold the park to car dealer Stephen Barberino Sr. and other partners in 1985, the Barberino partnership sold controlling interest that year to the Pennsylvania-based Hershey company, which held it until 1988, when Milwaukee concert promoter Joseph Entertainment took it over. The promoter went bankrupt and bills went unpaid. Boston Concessions briefly ran the park and the Barberinos bought the mortgage.

Ownership lawsuits and tax problems plagued the park and in 1994, Funtime Parks of Ohio signed on before Funtime was bought up the next year by another firm. Court battles continued, Funtime managed Lake Compounce and the Barberinos, who owned the park completely, kept looking for a new partner until they found Kennywood.

The deal between Kennywood and Parques Reunidos includes Kennywood Park in Pittsburgh, Idlewild and SoakZone in Ligonier, Penn., Sandcastle Waterpark in Pittsburgh Story Land in Glen, New Hampshire and Lake Compounce.

The sale is expected to close in March and the parties have not disclosed the purchase price.

Brick said the European buyers like what they've seen at Lake Compounce, which is focusing on expanding its water attractions.

"They're excited," said Brick.

Now that the deal has been announced, Brick said he hopes construction can begin in the spring on the waterpark expansion.

Starting in the spring, said Brick, was his goal all along, but until the pending sale was announced, moving ahead on the expansion early next year was less than certain.

"I wasn't quite sure we were going to start it in the spring," said Brick, adding that he now feels confident that the expansion will move ahead.

The Madrid firm has more money than Kennywood, said Brick, and is excited about the plans for Lake Compounce and thinks the sale will be good for the park and the region because an expanded park will bring more people to the area. Buyout talks began in the fall, according to Brick.

"It started just after the season ended," said Brick.

The 48 full-time workers at Lake Compounce will stay on under the new ownership, said Brick.

"At all the parks, they're keeping the management team in place," said Brick.

He said the park had 1,300 season workers last summer.

"This is a good team. We want to keep the whole team intact," said Brick.

In a prepared release from Kennywood, company Chairman Harry Henninger said the "Kennywood experience" would continue and "nothing will seem different," even to park workers.

"In recent years, we've had talks with other operators wishing to acquire us, but Parques Reunidos is the first one to share our vision and philosophy," Henninger said.

In the same release, Richard Golding, chief executive officer of Parques Reunidos, said the Madrid company has "tremendous respect for the work of the Kennywood management team and are delighted to acquire such a quality organization."

Golding added, "They've built Kennywood Entertainment into an industry leader in family entertainment. We are anxious to continue the gold standard of entertainment they have established."

Parques Reunidos manages 61 amusement, animal and water parks in the U.S. and Europe, with total annual visitors exceeding 22 million and revenues exceeding $570 million, according to information released by Kennywood. With the "financial backing of the Candover investment fund, a private equity investor in London," the Madrid firm "approached Kennywood with a purchase offer as part of their plan to consolidate family entertainment venues around the globe," the information from Kennywood said.

Brick said he favors "slow growth." He said growing too fast isn't the best for customers because unexpected problems crop up, like not enough parking or not enough bathrooms.

"If you grow slow, you can take care of those while you're growing," said Brick. "I've pushed that our commitment to slow growth is the best route."

Lake Compounce drew nearly 700,000 visitors last season, said Brick. He said more than 30,000 people bought a season pass, with the average pass holder visiting the park three times over the summer.

 

Foreign firms buying up nation's oldest parks

The planned sale of Kennywood Entertainment Co. to Madrid-based Parques Reunidos next spring will put two of America's three oldest historic parks into foreign control.

Besides Lake Compounce, Pittsburgh-based Kennywood owns historic Idlewild Park in Ligonier, Penn. – the nation's third oldest park – and historic Kennywood Park in Pittsburgh, which ranks 17 th oldest nationally, according to the National Amusement Park Historical Association.

Kennywood also owns the 55-year-old Story Land in Glen, New Hampshire as well SoakZone, a waterpark companion to Idlewild in Ligonier, and Sandcastle Waterpark in Pittsburgh.

"I've got concerns about it being owned by a foreign entity," said state Rep. Frank Nicastro, a Bristol Democrat who serves on the city council and is a former mayor. "I know nothing of this corporation."

Nicastro said he was sorry to hear that Kennywood, the Pittsburgh-based amusement park firm that owns Lake Compounce, was being sold to the Madrid-based Parques Reunidos.

But Nicastro said he wasn't going to make a snap judgment. Many companies are owned by overseas interests, he said.

"We have to see what happens," said Nicastro. "I'm not going to jump to conclusions."

A $3.5 million state grant to pay for moving Mount Vernon Road to make way for a Lake Compounce waterpark expansion isn't yet approved, Nicastro said, but is on track.

"It's part of the bonding package," said Nicastro, who supported the grant when Kennywood sought the help.Nicastro said having the state spend money to move the road was a worthy investment when Kennywood promised a $15 million waterpark expansion. Now that the company is changing hands, Nicastro said, he wants to make sure the expansion is still in the works before the state makes final approval on the money.

"We need to know for sure," said Nicastro. "It was an agreement."

Parques Reunidos already owns Palace Entertainment Holding Inc., an American operator of water parks and family entertainment centers.

 

Hard to keep an old park in the family

When an amusement park is family-owned, it can be hard to resist a tempting buyout offer, according to Stretch Norton, whose family owned and operated Lake Compounce for more than a century.

Norton said he understands how it might have been tough for the Henninger or McSwigan family members, who own the privately held Kennywood Entertainment Co. to resist a buyout offer from Madrid-based Parques Reunidos, "You can't get a consensus of what to do," said Norton, when multiple family members are involved in making a decision.

Norton family members lived in California, Florida and New York in addition to Connecticut. "With our case, it was a lot of widows and they were concerned about finances," said Norton.Still, Norton said, "We lasted four generations at least."

Gerry Brick, general manager of Lake Compounce, said the sale originated with Parques Reunidos.

"They actually sought Kennywood out," Brick said, "Kennywood wasn't really in the market to be sold."

But Brick said the members of the Henninger and McSwigan families who own the privately-held Kennywood Entertainment Co. are largely removed from the park operations.

"Very few of the family members are involved with the park anymore," said Brick.

According to information released by Kennywood on Tuesday, the company has been a "closely held family business since F.W. Henninger and Andrew McSwigan purchased Kennywood Park from the Monongahela Railway Company in 1906."

The Henninger and McSwigan families, now in fourth and fifth generation, have remained owners for over 100 years, the company said.

"This has been a very difficult decision for members of the founding families, now numbering over 100 and residing all over the country," said Kennywood Chairman Harry Henninger in a prepared statement released Tuesday.

Henninger called the family's experience of managing Kennywood, expanding Idlewild and Lake Compounce and creating Sandcastle "a magical ride."

Norton's ancestor Gad Norton, a former state lawmaker, first opened Lake Compounce on the Bristol and Southington town line in 1846, making it the oldest amusement park in America.

The Norton family, sometimes alone and sometimes in partnership with another family, owned and operated Lake Compounce until they finally sold it in 1985 to the Barberino family, a local family with a car dealership empire.

After it was acquired by the Barberinos, the park went through a series of owners, many from out of state and some better than others. For a time, it was primarily a venue for rock concerts.

Many of the owners shirked their property tax obligations and some failed to make mortgage payments. Norton described it as "a lumpy few years."

State Rep. Frank Nicastro, a Bristol Democrat who was mayor when Kennywood bought into Lake Compounce in 1996, said he had a "fantastic working relationship with Harry Henninger," who was then president of Kennywood.

Early in his tenure as mayor, Nicastro said, he was forced with the choice of either foreclosing on the nation's oldest amusement park or figuring out how to collect more than $1 million in back taxes on the shuttered park. "That was a heck of a thing hanging over a new mayor," said Nicastro.

Nicastro said he collected some payments from a previous owner, but negotiated with Henninger to settle the bill. Henninger was as good as his word, Nicastro said, and a check arrived as promised.

"From that point on, there was never a problem," said Nicastro. "Their taxes were always paid on time. Ever since then, they've been a great corporate citizen. I can only hope that it continues that way."

Norton was happy, too, when Kennywood entered the Lake Compounce picture.

"They were park people," said Norton. He said the first thing Kennywood did was rip out the amphitheater, which had caused a lot of problems with neighbors. "That was just ruining the park," said Norton.

When he learned Tuesday that his beloved Lake Compounce was sold yet again, Norton said, "I'm surprised and I'm not surprised. I could see it happening."

Norton said all of the Kennywood owners might not be as dedicated to the amusement industry to the same degree.

"I just don't think their heart is really in it, has been in it, for awhile anyway," Norton said. The boom years of the amusement park business are in the past, according to Norton.

He said waterparks are cheaper to build, insure and operate than rollercoasters and other thrill rides.

The liability insurance to cover the thrill rides, Norton said, is "tough to handle."

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Can I ask a stupid question?

 

I'm not as into the coaster thing as I used to be but... what's the big deal? Nobody is going to turn it into condos, nobody is changing anything next year, they said that they were going to keep everything the same (and why not if it's profitable?)

 

This seems like a minor news story and if you didn't hear about it, you probably wouldn't even notice a difference at the park.

 

Did I miss something?

 

I will go a little further than Scott did and forgive me if I ramble too much.

 

I have been going to Kennywood every year since I was born and I have a lot of memories and experiences in the park. If you asked me what I would change (other than keeping that second train on Phantom), I would say NOTHING.

 

While young people here and elsewhere don't see the big picture, let be the person who points out the obvious. Kennywood will probably never get more than a million people through the gate in a year without a MAJOR change to the landscape. It is a regional park and has been supported by the local economy since it's inception. A family run business where you can see a member of the Henninger family or Carl Hughes walking around picking up trash.

 

Little changes might not make a difference to some of the thrill seekers here, but they would dent the atmosphere of the park.

 

Example, say that the new owners make a deal with a food vendor and the only obstacle is Kennywood's picnic policy. While in the grand scheme, it may not look like a huge operational change to most, how would it affect all the people who have for generations gathered for dinner before viewing the Fall Fantasy parades. Or maybe, you are an Italian family that has met with all your friends year after year to sample each others dishes at the annual Italian Day. To most it would be a small deal, but to those families that have supported the park for years it would be monumental.

 

Also, as Scott pointed out, it isn't really a matter of what happens next season but how the corporation performs over the next few years. What happens if the corporate parent bites off more than they can chew and is forced to "fire sale" off all of it's properties. Who will the next owner be? Will they share the same philosophies?

 

These are all issues that we never needed to consider while the current owners were in place. Kennywood was an institution that while changing moderately to accommodate the times, never deviated from it's core mission.

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I know this is the pessimist in me speaking, but I gotta ask the question - has there ever been an example of a smaller park that was taken over by a larger corporation that resulted in a better park?

 

I can't think of one....

 

 

I'll give you one. Ironically, it was acquired by a larger corporation called Kennywood Entertainment....up on Connecticut somewhere.

 

Agreed, though. This is a rare occurence when a smaller park is made "better" by a corporate takeover. One could argue that SFNE and Great Escape have a better attraction mix since being acquired by SFI, but then you have intangibles like atmosphere that sometimes are sacrificed. Knott's is a perfect example.

 

-Mark

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I have a feeling that the first big change your going to see is no more free soft drinks.

 

I disagree, it is part of the park and will continue to be. The park itself does not lose a large amount of money from offering free softdrinks. It was done under the same philosophy that HW has stated in the past.

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^^^^Beautifully stated Ted. I've only been to Kennywood once, but I really loved the place despite the annoyance of going on a school day.

 

You're 100% right. Seemingly little changes, like replacing buzz bars with ratcheting lap bars or installing gates in the coaster stations, would add up over time and detract from the overall classic feel of the park.

 

I have a feeling that the first big change your going to see is no more free soft drinks.

 

Kennywood has free soda?

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Hypothetically speaking, who knows if 20 or 30 years down the line the Koch family just simply gets "tired" of running a park and wants to be able to live a very comfortable life for them and future generations without ever having to work again?

 

Well, yeah, apply that to Kennywood and it holds true. The sale is estimated at $200 million, and that's probably enough to live well for a while. The family and current management isn't necessarily being cut out altogether, though, from what we know, and I hope that won't happen. Kind of like a Tom from Myspace situation.

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