Jump to content
  TPR Home | Parks | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Instagram 

Disneyland Resort (DL, DLR, DCA) Discussion Thread

P. 391: All the details about Disney Merriest Nites at Disneyland!

Recommended Posts

Rebecca Goddard takes her sons, age 4 and 6, to Disneyland once a week. Her sons have autism and can't stand in lines longer than a few minutes before they start pushing other people.

 

"My boys don't have the cognition to understand why it's going to be a long wait," Goddard told the Register. "There are so few things for my boys that bring them utter joy and happiness - to mess with it just makes me sad."

Crap like this just annoys me. Anyone who goes to Disneyland once a week should know better that there are PLENTY of things they can do in the park, that don't require standing in lines more than a few minutes that they can do inbetween their "Disabled Person FastPass" time slot. This is just a poor excuse because they are losing their unlimited front of the line access pass.

 

These people just want to abuse the system and I'm GLAD to see Disney make this change.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love that Autism Speaks is on-board with the change in policy. I couldn't be happier that this abuse of the current system is being addressed. Technically this process has already been in effect since '99. It's called FASTPASS.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We dealt with stuff like this ALL the time when I worked for Special Olympics. The parents want their children to be 'mainstreamed' and get all of the perks to being a 'normal kid'...EXCEPT when they can get something cool like a front of the line pass or special event ticket because then all of a sudden their kid is 'special'. You can't have it both ways. That's just cheating!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rebecca Goddard takes her sons, age 4 and 6, to Disneyland once a week. Her sons have autism and can't stand in lines longer than a few minutes before they start pushing other people.

 

"My boys don't have the cognition to understand why it's going to be a long wait," Goddard told the Register. "There are so few things for my boys that bring them utter joy and happiness - to mess with it just makes me sad."

There are not enough facepalms in the world to describe how I feel about what I'm seeing. This is the most invalid argument I have ever seen in my life!

 

Speaking from a standpoint of one who actually has a disability (I'm autistic), I really don't care about the system changing (all the power to the parks). I've gotten used to the new Fastpass-esque disability systems that the other parks have been using (Universal, Cedar Fair, etc.), and sometimes I'll just go through the regular standby line and not use the disability pass at all. I don't mind standing in a 30-90 minute long line for a ride that's 1-5 minutes, I've been in longer lines than that in my life and I've never complained about it, I just deal with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^That's good to hear.

 

As the parent of an autistic kid, I always try to challenge my son to do things that are outside his comfort zone. For children that young, you are doing them an injustice by taking the easy way out and using their handicap as an excuse. If her kids actually start pushing people if they wait in line (?!?!?) there is something else wrong that probably isn't autism.

 

I would never use a special line-skipping system for my son...I'll pay for a regular one or use Fast Pass.

Edited by ernierocker
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We dealt with stuff like this ALL the time when I worked for Special Olympics. The parents want their children to be 'mainstreamed' and get all of the perks to being a 'normal kid'...EXCEPT when they can get something cool like a front of the line pass or special event ticket because then all of a sudden their kid is 'special'. You can't have it both ways. That's just cheating!

 

Exactly, they want to be thought of and seen as just like everybody else...except when they can gain an advantage because of their circumstances. Suddenly being separated and therefore unequal is just fine, dandy, and even necessary to the point where Disney becomes insensitive to disabled and troubled kids if they are denied or even questioned about the special treatment.

 

The parents of those kids who really want equality for their kids should be standing up and cheering these changes because it makes them more equal to everybody else who goes to those parks. But, the resistance demonstrates that it's not equality they're upholding, it's this advantage they've been given and will now be taken away in part. That's exactly what they're angry about losing. It has nothing to do with equality or Disney's sensitivity towards special needs guests.

 

Rebecca Goddard takes her sons, age 4 and 6, to Disneyland once a week. Her sons have autism and can't stand in lines longer than a few minutes before they start pushing other people.

 

"My boys don't have the cognition to understand why it's going to be a long wait," Goddard told the Register. "There are so few things for my boys that bring them utter joy and happiness - to mess with it just makes me sad."

 

Shoving other people is normal behavior for normal kids, especially if they're in a queue with others. Kids are trained to behave in a civil manner. To think not training them, and then citing the negative behavior that results is grounds for an entitlement that is meant for disabled people is nuts. I'm sure if the kids are really autistic, there are other symptoms and reasons why she'd need the GAC, but that's the one she pointed out. She should be told that she needs to keep her kids under control, or the kids will not be admitted into the attraction queues at all. Either that, or pick a different symptom of autism to cite.

Edited by PeoplemoverMatt
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As the parent of an autistic kid, I always try to challenge my son to do things that are outside his comfort zone. For children that young, you are doing them an injustice by taking the easy way out and using their handicap as an excuse. If her kids actually start pushing people if they wait in line (?!?!?) there is something else wrong that probably isn't autism.

 

That's good to hear. I can understand why ADHD, autism or aspergers might be problematic with regards to waiting in line, but am somewhat skeptical when it's wheeled out as a reason why somebody needs immediate access to a ride and cannot just get a return time.

 

Doesn't Universal have something similar to the DAS system in place already?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As someone who uses the GAP when visiting the park, I am looking forward to the system change. I don't mind waiting in the GAP line for Space Mountain (or other rides) for as long as the line wait is, just as long as I have the option to sit down and keep my nerve pain to a minimum. Now I can actually squeeze food in, sit down in a air conditioned area, or get in line for a ride that has a minimum wait time. There are so many options.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doesn't Universal have something similar to the DAS system in place already?

Last time I went to USH (which was about a few months back), they did have something like this in place. There's also another similar system being used at the Cedar Fair parks as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a frequent visitor to the parks. (I live in Orange County) I have seen the (((massive))) abuse to the system.

Anyone who 'claims' to have some sort of issue is given a pass with out question. When I heard that some people were actually paying a 'guide' to help them, I thought they were complete utter morons, because ((anyone or any reason)) can request a pass.(without paying $$$ to some guide)

 

Regardless, I'm very glad that Disney has addressed this issue and is trying to improve the situation. I only hope that when a person is told that they have to wait an hour to ride Star Tours, that they can't head over to Space Mountain and get pass for Space Mountain until their pass for Star Tours is used. first. Though I doubt that is the case, those with issues will likely just go from one attraction to the next and 'stock up' disabled fast passes for the day.

 

There has to be a better way to manage this situation, If a child or person is obviously in need then I want them to have access. But allowing (((anyone))) to get a pass is just wrong. Disney is smart, and they know about the abuse to the system, I hope they find a way to make it work...........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's an..... interesting.... article I found. Beware, lots of facepalms may ensue!

 

I couldn't even finish reading it I was so disgusted. It says 'we aren't entitled' yet the tone of the article clearly says 'we are entitled.'

 

If more of the 'not entitled' stay mad and don't go, the lines will be shorter, at least by a few people.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have Aspergers and when I wait in a long line, I get upset. Dollywood has a great special needs service at the Ride Accessibility Center. At Dollywood, there's no wait at all, but at a place like Disneyland I'm sure there's a wait because it's so popular.

 

^Hey guess what, EVERYONE gets annoyed at waiting in a long line! Nothing special there.

 

Seriously, listen to what Elissa is saying here. You need to learn patience. Do you want to overcome your disability or hide behind it? People diagnosed in the autism spectrum are not cursed for eternity. Especially considering how many doctors over diagnose Aspergers just so parents have an excuse for their socially, awkward kid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's an..... interesting.... article I found. Beware, lots of facepalms may ensue!

 

It's called "Why we're not entitled".

 

My takeaway from that article is that the families with special needs children got so accustomed to Disney going above and beyond to accommodate them that it will be "impossible" for THEM to adjust.

 

It is fair to say that we will never be able to truly understand what they go through, since many of us do not have special needs children, but the reality is that if they want to be treated as a "normal" guest---this is what a normal guest has to experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

My takeaway from that article is that the families with special needs children got so accustomed to Disney going above and beyond to accommodate them that it will be "impossible" for THEM to adjust.

 

It is fair to say that we will never be able to truly understand what they go through, since many of us do not have special needs children, but the reality is that if they want to be treated as a "normal" guest---this is what a normal guest has to experience.

 

 

Well said! I know what it's like... it can be tough and grating, but it's not like we're being FORCED into waiting the lines... and if I had THESE passes when I was little, I'd love to catch a show while we wait for... say space mountain.

 

When I was very young I was diagnosed as being on the spectrum... but I refused to let that take over my life and through many trials and errors (OOh, the errors) I overcame it. (With help) I was forced to come out of my shell from one job and forced to break all social barriers with another. It was tough but now I 'm no longer one of 'em! And it feels great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey guys- heading to California Adventure tomorrow (can't wait to finally check out Cars Land!!) from San Francisco, but haven't purchased tickets yet.

 

Any ideas on places to get discounted tickets for 2 people? We will only be going to DCA, not Disneyland...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey guys- heading to California Adventure tomorrow (can't wait to finally check out Cars Land!!) from San Francisco, but haven't purchased tickets yet.

 

Any ideas on places to get discounted tickets for 2 people? We will only be going to DCA, not Disneyland...

 

AAA sometimes offers some, but you have to buy them at one of their locations. Also a lot of hotels around disneyland offer their own tickets to the park for a little less than front gate prices, but you have to be a guest at the hotel. Disneyland might also take a little bit off the top of their prices if you buy online and print them out.

 

Other than those, I don't really know of any Disneyland discounts which you can get for only buying tickets to one park for one day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey guys- heading to California Adventure tomorrow (can't wait to finally check out Cars Land!!) from San Francisco, but haven't purchased tickets yet.

 

Any ideas on places to get discounted tickets for 2 people? We will only be going to DCA, not Disneyland...

 

Yeah, its not the time of year they run discounts unfortunately.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use https://themeparkreview.com/forum/topic/116-terms-of-service-please-read/