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Universal Orlando Resort (USO, IOA) Discussion Thread

P. 602: Universal Holidays & Velocicoaster photo report posted!

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I know this is very last minute but is there anyone who hasn't been to hhn this year......and wants to go? If you can be INSIDE universal studios before closing hurry and send me a private message!

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I like how they build a roller coaster in the same time it took them to built new lockers for Harry Potter.   

On Sunday I ventured out to the Universal Orlando Resort for a chance to see the new holiday offerings at the two parks. This year is a little different thanks to COVID-19, but Universal has still man

^Agreed. I think the newer Intamin lapbars are actually the best steel coaster restraint currently being produced. When comparing overhead lapbars on Taron and Blue Fire, I found the Intamin ones to b

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Finally getting around to my HHN review:

 

1. American Warewolf in London: Fantastic! The puppets were incredible, the sets were great (loved the scale of the tube station and city sets), and the performers were on point. Easily the winner of the night.

 

2. Resident Evil: I loved this one for the scale of the sets (was that the helicopter from Kong towards the end?) and that the scenes weren't all about scares. I personally enjoyed all the scenes with the RPD vs. zombies and you just being in the middle. The ending scene was fun too.

 

3. Evil Dead: Did a great job translating the movie. Performers were good. Only downside was the ending. Talk about raining blood, but then raining blood?!?

 

4. La Llorna: having seen this for two years in Hollywood, I understood the story and really enjoyed it. Great sets and scares. Basically took Hollywood's version and made it bigger.

 

5. Walking Dead: I haven't seen the show, so I can't fully appreciate all the scenes. Thought it was a solid maze, and really liked the part where you had to get lower to get through. Lost some points for me because unlike Hollywoods version (which could stand on its own as a zombie prison without the WD theme), I felt this one was too WD specific so I didn't fully understand everything.

 

6. Cabin in the Woods: Great sets. Too short. Touched on the key points of the movie and did great, but felt short and not enough scares. Could have been because we went through early.

 

7. Havoc: I actually liked the train theme. Made for some good tight space scares. Really liked that the performers had gun props that looked real. Just another one that felt short.

 

8. Afterlife: Seriously. WTF. Very loose theme of electrocution, but mostly weak 3D effects. Was disappointed.

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Just to echo 4 more votes for american werewolf in london .also loved the 3d maze had no idea were were. Seen Hogwarts express on track Thursday night as we came out of one of the mazes ,by Friday afternoon could see 4 carriages on track from dragons challenge.

 

Stu k

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I have recently been to Universal IOA and rode Hulk. I have recorded the acceleration using my phone. After a bit of data processing (normalizing the axes) I got this graph.

 

I have 10 different readings, this is just one of them. There are lots of error sources, including a few samples that are clipped (acceleration was over the sensor limit). I do have data for the blue track of the Dragon Challenge, Manta and Kraken, but I haven't looked at it yet.

 

A few observations:

 

Maximum total acceleration: about 3.5G

Maximum lateral acceleration: less than 1G

Maximum forward acceleration: a bit over 1.5G (at launch)

Actual ride length: about 45 seconds

 

I am wondering if this was done before

Hulk.thumb.PNG.480994f1b42ed453ae4f8d110c04a099.PNG

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Interesting. I assume that, given that there is forward acceleration throughout the ride, you didn't sit in the middle, right?

 

I don't see how forward acceleration can be influenced greatly by the seat on the ride.

 

There are 5 distinct changes in the forward acceleration:

 

1: the train leaves

2: ascending part (because the inclination changes the gravitational acceleration component is present on the movement direction)

3: launch

4: first stop

5: complete stop

Hulk1.thumb.png.1fda1d19af4e0d46da0b71e1eea82db3.png

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Looks like most of the ones we do with our accelerometers. Yours seems to have more noise reduction compared to ours, and we haven't really bothered with normalization as well, so ours still needs work before they look as good as the ones you posted.

Not sure how many logs we have at the moment, but I guess that we have logged 300-400 coasters so far.

 

Here is for instance SD2K

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Looks like most of the ones we do with our accelerometers. Yours seems to have more noise reduction compared to ours, and we haven't really bothered with normalization as well, so ours still needs work before they look as good as the ones you posted.

Here is for instance SD2K

 

I used https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.lul.accelerometer&hl=en on my Nexus 4. Every point plotted is an average of 10 readings. One reading was taken every 20 ms. Graph was done using google docs.

 

Are your logs available anywhere? What accelerometer did you use? How is it connected to the ride?

 

I think normalization is pretty important, and is not hard to do.

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I used https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.lul.accelerometer&hl=en on my Nexus 4. Every point plotted is an average of 10 readings. One reading was taken every 20 ms. Graph was done using google docs.

 

Are your logs available anywhere? What accelerometer did you use? How is it connected to the ride?

 

I think normalization is pretty important, and is not hard to do.

Nice program, but we use a home built unit which in it's latest version use a 3 channel accelerometer with +-16g's in range which also have a 3 channel rotational sensor as well, so we can in theory get a lot of data of the rides we log. Since it's more a project my brother is playing around with, it's really he who have most logs that we have so far. Our accelerometer unit is really small and we have it strapped to our chest, just like a heart rate monitor, just so that we log everything what the rider feels at the heart-line.

 

I agree with you on the normalization aspect and I would love to be able to normalize and do some noise reduction but it requires quite a load of calculations to get right as far as I know, and I'm no programming whiz to be able to get an automated program for it.

What programs do you use for normalization and doing the noise reduction, or is that a feature which is built in to the program above?

 

If you want to know more contact my brother, lond here on TPR, to know more.

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Gentlemen, as a man of science, I have checked all of the hypotenuses and double checked the flux capacitation dynamic to come to the Pythagorean conclusion that, yes, Hulk is awesome.

 

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Interesting. I assume that, given that there is forward acceleration throughout the ride, you didn't sit in the middle, right?

 

I don't see how forward acceleration can be influenced greatly by the seat on the ride.

Well let's say you sit in the very back of a coaster. If there is a big first drop (like on hypers and gigas) you will notice that the back is pulled by the rest of the train over the top. If you sit in the front, on the other hand, you will be left sort of hanging for a while before the rest of the train enters the drop. This can also be noticed on some loops, for example. When I rode batman the ride at sfgadv I remember that, when sitting in the front, it would have a sort of hanging feel once that part of the train had cleared the top of the loop while in the back it was the opposite: it would be "pulled" down the second half of the loop. The longer the trains are the bigger the difference is. In theory, the middle is where there are less forward or backwards forces as it is the center of mass of the train.

 

You can clearly see the two stops on the graphic as then the forward acceleration is negative but throughout the rest of the ride there are smaller variations partially cause by this.

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I agree with you on the normalization aspect and I would love to be able to normalize and do some noise reduction but it requires quite a load of calculations to get right as far as I know, and I'm no programming whiz to be able to get an automated program for it.

What programs do you use for normalization and doing the noise reduction, or is that a feature which is built in to the program above?

 

It is really easy to do the rotation of the measuring device and to do some basic noise reduction. You only need some spreadsheet calculations.

 

To rotate the coordinates of the measuring device take a look here http://www.mathematics-online.org/inhalt/aussage/aussage444/. That is the rotation in a single plane. Since you have 3 dimensions, you have to apply the transformation 3 times.

 

I will go step by step explaining how I got the graph for another IOA coaster Dragon Challenge: Hungarian Horntail

 

Imagine that your measuring device is an cube withe 3 axes: forward, lateral and vertical, and you want to rotate it in the right position

 

This is my raw data:

1m.thumb.png.2da698c22f915a0c78f6f57cfc64fa5c.png

Notice how in some places the vertical acceleration hit a limit at about 40 m/s^2, that is because the sensor in my Nexus 4 has a maximum range of 39.22 m/s^2, that is 4g, with g considered at 9.805

 

At the beginning of the graph the gravitational acceleration has components on all 3 axis of the sensor, more on the lateral, and less on the forward.

 

Using the formula here http://www.mathematics-online.org/inhalt/aussage/aussage444/, I rotated the device around it's lateral axis, until the forward axis was on the horizontal plane, so the gravitational component on it would be 0. Because of the noise, I used an average value to find the rotation angle.

 

The lateral component is unchanged, only the forward and vertical components are changed.

2.thumb.PNG.692cb9dcf89370f6af18407a38d1c720.PNG

I did the same exact thing for the the lateral axis, I rotated the device around it's forward axis. This time the forward axis is unchanged, and the lateral axis becomes 0, transferring it's gravitational component to the vertical axis. Notice how the fact that the device clipped at measuring the full acceleration is not evident anymore.

 

When stationary, the gravitational acceleration is 0 on both lateral and forward axis

3m.thumb.png.d0656f9d48ecdbd4b3d8974798e73b07.png

But the device is still not "straight", when the train is going forward, the acceleration is split in two components, between the forward and the lateral, but not on the vertical, we already ensured that the vertical is really "vertical".

 

On the hill, even at constant speed, the gravitational pull is spitted between the vertical, the forward and the lateral. This is the opportunity to rotate the device one more time, so the gravitational pull has no lateral component. I rotated the device around the vertical axis, at an angle that the lateral acceleration is 0 while the train is climbing the hill.

 

This time, since the train is moving, there is even more noise, so it is even more important to use an average value when calculating the right angle of rotation.

4.thumb.PNG.a546aadfe15c1500c49769a9c368bbfd.PNG

Now I calculated each point as the average of the previous 10 values, noise reduction.

5.thumb.PNG.7ab0891e27ba644047e3282befc41ae5.PNG

And as the average of the previous 20 values, a more aggressive noise reduction.

6.thumb.PNG.55b910370a1ba32237adbe3f5798198f.PNG

I hope I was clear enough, if you need help, or I haven't explained something properly, please let me know.

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You can clearly see the two stops on the graphic as then the forward acceleration is negative but throughout the rest of the ride there are smaller variations partially cause by this.

 

What you are saying is true, but I don't thing that there are any conclusions to be made based on a single graph. I think that the variation is insignificant among all the other forces involved.

 

It would be very interesting to get data in an consistent way, a few samples from the front seat, a few from the middle and a few from the back, and compare them.

 

I went on Manta the other day, on the back seat, and it was amazing. Front row is definitely overrated.

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Dragon Challenge: Hungarian Horntail elements in the ride:

6m.thumb.png.ac0026ce03f1c844fa9ea45bca369e4c.png

Please correct me if I am wrong!

 

1. start moving

2. start climbing the hill

3. 0g loop

4,5,7,8 kinetic energy is used (breaking, red) to spin the train (lateral g, blue)

6. break

9. final break

10, 11 breaks

12. final stop

 

40 seconds, total ride time.

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Sorry to take away from the science talk. I might even be late on this but its great news to hear they are upgrading the projectors for both The Simpsons ride and Forbidden Journey. I remember the first time I went through Journey and thought wow, these videos look aged. It's as if Universal listens to us.

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Interesting. I assume that, given that there is forward acceleration throughout the ride, you didn't sit in the middle, right?

 

I don't see how forward acceleration can be influenced greatly by the seat on the ride.

Well let's say you sit in the very back of a coaster. If there is a big first drop (like on hypers and gigas) you will notice that the back is pulled by the rest of the train over the top. If you sit in the front, on the other hand, you will be left sort of hanging for a while before the rest of the train enters the drop. This can also be noticed on some loops, for example. When I rode batman the ride at sfgadv I remember that, when sitting in the front, it would have a sort of hanging feel once that part of the train had cleared the top of the loop while in the back it was the opposite: it would be "pulled" down the second half of the loop. The longer the trains are the bigger the difference is. In theory, the middle is where there are less forward or backwards forces as it is the center of mass of the train.

 

You can clearly see the two stops on the graphic as then the forward acceleration is negative but throughout the rest of the ride there are smaller variations partially cause by this.

 

Loefet and I have 20+ measurements of Balder from almost every row and we can approximate where in the train the measurement was recorded with the force-characteristic of the airtime hills. You can see this in almost every coaster.

 

Good explanation about rotation and noise reduction.

 

/// Marcus

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Sorry to take away from the science talk. I might even be late on this but its great news to hear they are upgrading the projectors for both The Simpsons ride and Forbidden Journey. I remember the first time I went through Journey and thought wow, these videos look aged. It's as if Universal listens to us.

 

Unfortunately I doubt it will help Harry Potter. Simpsons is a simulator through and through, so an upgrade is great. For Potter, though, the image will be better but the integration will still be crap. The whole zipper-style they devised with the vehicles entering the domes was a great idea on paper but poor on execution. Also, the speed difference between screen scenes and live scenes is kind of ridiculous. Spider-Man / Transformers managed the speed differential perfectly. Potter goes from 0-60-0 in 1/2 of a second.

 

I'm reallllllllly hoping they fix it for Hollywood. I do love the ride, I just feel it needed an extra year of incubation in the lab before being made.

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Loefet and I have 20+ measurements of Balder from almost every row and we can approximate where in the train the measurement was recorded with the force-characteristic of the airtime hills. You can see this in almost every coaster.

 

Do you have data regarding the seat on the row? I feel that an lateral seat really makes a difference compared to a middle seat, not only because of the better view, but also because of the G forces.

 

What are you trying to do with the data? Are you going to make it public, or publish it?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just going to throw this out there.

 

Hollywood Rip Ride Rockit was an absolute surprise. I didn't expect much more than an average ride, but it was anything but that. Great airtime, forceful, and comfortable. It may be a nasty ride to maintain, but it kicks some serious butt. Haters gonna hate, but I cannot find a reason to complain about this one.

 

Universal Studios and Islands of Adventure were both amazing parks, but I'm too lazy to type up a full report so I just wanted to make my opinion on this coaster known.

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http://www.licensing.biz/news/read/creative-licensing-details-merchandise-plans-for-bill-and-ted-s-25th-anniversary/038954

 

A range of apparel, toys and posters will mark the milestone in 2014

 

Independent entertainment licensing agency Creative Licensing Corporation has detailed the merchandise programme for Bill and Ted's 25th birthday celebrations in 2014.

 

The stars of 1989 movie Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure and its 1991 sequel Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey celebrate 25 years in 2014, and there will be a range of apparel, toys, posters and live show marking the milestone.

 

The duo have enjoyed a life beyond the films thanks to Bill and Ted's Excellent Halloween Adventure at Universal Studios Orlando Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood. The show has been running since 1991 and will now continue to run for the next five years thanks to new deal with Universal.

 

Elsewhere, a new Bill and Ted comic book series is on the way from BOOM along with collectible figures from Funko and art posters from Mondo.

 

Fans will also be able to wear Bill and Ted clothing thanks to new deals with apparel makers Global in the UK and Junkfood and ODM in the US.

 

Bill and Ted will also return to the big screen in the near future, with Alex Winter recently confirming that work is under way for a third film.

image.jpg.ab1c552594420c48ca9217a3b5f496f5.jpg

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