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Xbox360 Elite package?


Imhotep
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Erm, forgive me for being blunt, but since when did a hardcore gamer need all that space? I can see a PC Gamer needing it, but a console gamer? Not as much. I am not trading mine in. This is kind of an insult to people who just got a 360 or during the holidays. It would've been better to think of this before the holidays so that people wouldn't buy a Premium/Core then only a month later go through the trouble of trading it in for the Elite.

Its like getting a top-of-the-line computer then having a better model comeout as you're leaving the store.

 

Nowadays, I think the lines between 'pc gamer' and 'console gamer' are fading away considering the newer consoles out there are basically computers with proprietary operating systems. If you are really into downloading movies/demos/tv shows off of XBL, you can very quickly fill up a 20gb HD. 120gb is huge, but Microsoft has stated that the whole XBL and gaming experience in general will still be designed around the 20gb so there is no theat of your HD becoming obsolete or you being forced to upgrade.

 

The Elite is only for a very small group of consumers out there in my opinion. Since the 120gb hard drive is going to be sold seperately, there is only one other feature added to the Elite box, which is HDMI. Really, the only reason to get HDMI is for 1080p (unless you are an audiophile, but most arent too concerned about that), and the amount of people who own 1080p tvs is sparse.

 

I really don't see how the 'average' consumer who may have just bought a 360 could have been insulted or screwed over. If they have a 1080i tv, or a tv that can do 1080p over component, then they dont need to upgrade.

 

As far as trade ins go, you're more than likely to get screwed going that route anyways.. Just sell it outright.. You may get $350 or more for it depending on what you sell with it, and someone will buy it considering thats what they are going to prob pay for a used one at a game store anyways.

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Most games on the Xbox 360 are designed in 720p. Even if you have you Xbox to display 1080p, its still only going to be 720p, or possibly 1080i if designed to do that, because thats just he way the game is. The Xbox 360 doesn't have the power to render games at 1080p without a large loss in geometry in the games.

 

Not true, while it does break large visuals into sections, the speed at which it does it makes it just as capable as the PS3 at displaying 1080P visuals.

 

 

But I do agree, there really is no reason to get the Elite unless you bought a HD-TV with no other connections except HDMI, or you download so much crap from Xbox live your out of room, besides you can always just BUY the hard drive

 

I have the premium, and there is no reason to upgrade, I love my 360, it has been a total blast.

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Seeing I own a pro already, i'll spring for the 120GB HD and some black controllers. As of now, HDMI is just an add-on that really isnt needed until we truly get a nexgen-based media standard or we get everyone to adopt IPTV(Which AT&T and MS will push to happen in the US), which will benefit from the HDMIs digital rights protection scheme.

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I have An Xbox 360 core and i have no problems with it.

IMO its just a Black 360 with a bigger hard drive and hd dvd player

 

HD DVD player comes with, eh?? ah, I get it, april fools....

 

You were right on, Im sure you meant HDMI and not HD-DVD player.

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I have An Xbox 360 core and i have no problems with it.

IMO its just a Black 360 with a bigger hard drive and hd dvd player

 

HD DVD player comes with, eh?? ah, I get it, april fools....

 

You were right on, Im sure you meant HDMI and not HD-DVD player.

 

Your correct.

I just think that it looks like somthing bigger than it is

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a quieter disk drive and a redesigned processor that is supposed to put off alot less heat.

 

The Processor (65nm) that everyone's been waiting for, apparently wont be making an appearance yet, maybe later in the year.

As for the quieter DVD drive, not really, well maybe, who knows?

 

There's a little info about that:

http://www.xbox-scene.com/xbox1data/sep/EEZVpyEVpEmChrbnZJ.php

 

I guess it's just gonna be the same except the HDD and HDMI.

All I know is I'm getting one just for the bigger HDD, I was a little upset when my 20 gb hdd was really only about 13 gb??

The HDMI will also free up a component spot on my TV, don't know if it will look any different, since I will still only run my box at 720P...we'll see.

 

I got lucky ( I guess) I am still under the 90 day return policy at Wii-Mart, so I'm gonna bring mine back a few days before the Elite comes out, then BAM! I'll give M$ more of my hard earned money.

But I look at it this way, I want the bigger Hdd and $180 to upgrade is a crime, but an extra $80, not so much and the bonus of HDMI.

So I guess I'm one of the few that is Pro Elite, unlike most others, but if I couldn't take mine back and trade up, I guess I would be a little upset.

 

 

I just hope they don't sell out before I get mine and I am without my box for too long.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I guess no one really cares about this topic, since the last post was mine over 2 weeks ago.....but....

 

 

I just had to post this somewhere.

 

My 360 is dead red lights and all...lucky me.

 

At least now I wont feel guilty bringing it back and saying it is broken, cuz it is broken.

 

So now I have to go 2 weeks without "Gears" , I'm sooo gonna suck when I get back online. And that's if I even get an Elite on day one, I got my upc for it and we are only gettin 4...that's right 4.

It should be fine, I guess, I hope I can get one next Sat. night, I really don't want to wait much longer than that.

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I was going to get one but then I decided there was no need for one so I went out and bought the pro package last week.

 

Really, there is no need unless you have a hi def tv. Sure the 120 gigabytes is cool, but the only time thing I can see taking up space on the hard drive is movies, but you just delete those anyways since rentals only last up to 14 days/24 hours after you first watch your movie.

 

If I really ever need to upgrade I'll probably just trade mine in and get the elite, but for now, the pro package suits me just fine. As it was I spent $600 getting everything I needed (xbox unit, gears of war, 2nd controller, monitor adapter)

 

Not to mention that the black is so last generation of consoles. The white is so much cleaner and sexier to look at. Kind of wanna make love to it now.

 

As for over heating, mine over heated a couple of times but then I just moved the power strip further away from it as that was getting pretty warm, then I gave the unit itself some more space and I haven't had any problems since. Occassionally I'll get a "can't read disk" error, but it happens every once in awhile.

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I was going to get one but then I decided there was no need for one so I went out and bought the pro package last week.

 

Really, there is no need unless you have a hi def tv. Sure the 120 gigabytes is cool, but the only time thing I can see taking up space on the hard drive is movies, but you just delete those anyways since rentals only last up to 14 days/24 hours after you first watch your movie.

 

If I really ever need to upgrade I'll probably just trade mine in and get the elite, but for now, the pro package suits me just fine. As it was I spent $600 getting everything I needed (xbox unit, gears of war, 2nd controller, monitor adapter)

 

Not to mention that the black is so last generation of consoles. The white is so much cleaner and sexier to look at. Kind of wanna make love to it now.

 

As for over heating, mine over heated a couple of times but then I just moved the power strip further away from it as that was getting pretty warm, then I gave the unit itself some more space and I haven't had any problems since. Occassionally I'll get a "can't read disk" error, but it happens every once in awhile.

 

There is no real reason to get one even if you have a hi def tv. Im more than happy with my premium edition. The extra hard drive space is nice, but not worth the money. The hdmi addition is just stupid. Component works just as well ( and I do use my hdmi inputs, but the 360 works great on component). This is just a way for microsoft to suck money out of people with way too much disposable income.

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I might get one since since I don't have a normal 360 and Microsoft finally made the patch for Jet Set Radio Future which was my favorite game for the XBox. Until that patch came out, I really couldn't justify buying a 360.

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Slushie posted: The Xbox 360 doesn't have the power to render games at 1080p without a large loss in geometry in the games

 

Looks like the standard resolution for 360 games will be 720P.

 

No proper "Full HD" for 360 unless it gets a graphic's add-on like it's HD HDD player. Even more cost for 360 owners, when the PS3 does 1080P and "Blu Ray" out the tin.

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I got mine !!

 

But I lost all my game saves... ........

 

I tried to use the xport to save the data off my old 20g and on to the 120g. Well it didn't quite work out, I got the data from the old one on my computer, but when I hooked up the new HD to it and added all the stuff, the Elite didn't read it, the space was taken up on my HD but the files just weren't there???

I tried everything, needless to say, I wiped the new HD clean, so all the free crap ( and it was almost all crap) is gone , but still only 107gb free?? what does it use all that space for? there is nothing on it and the core doesn't need whatever it is to run games...so what is it?? Who knows, all I know is I have to play all my games over again, to get to where I was. At least my achievements where all safe and sound on XBL

 

Well the Elite seems to be a little quieter, I think, but its from a different DVD drive, not the fan, it's still the same. One think I thought was cool ( not sure why ) was that when I hooked it up with HDMI it ran right from the start in my tv's native resolution 1366 x 768, not 720p or 1080i. But it's says "optimal resolution" 1366 x 768 @ 60 hz. Not sure if that's better than 720p or not? anybody?? either way it looks damn good.

 

and

 

it up-converts my dvds...yippie..I guess.

 

Long story short ( too late ) I like it.

Also I just purchased the extended 2 year warranty. And for only a measly 50 bucks I am covered for 3 years, so it can break all it wants, though I hope it doesn't.

 

Peace

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Slushie posted: The Xbox 360 doesn't have the power to render games at 1080p without a large loss in geometry in the games

 

Looks like the standard resolution for 360 games will be 720P.

 

No proper "Full HD" for 360 unless it gets a graphic's add-on like it's HD HDD player. Even more cost for 360 owners, when the PS3 does 1080P and "Blu Ray" out the tin.

 

The 360 is capable of 1080p, right out of the box, even the basic version with no hard drive, it just does not have a HDMI port, that is all

 

The 720p standard is for performance reasons, the game will play alot faster at the lower resolution, there are already games out that use 1080p for the 360

 

As for the Hd-dvd, considering Walmart is planning a $200 HD-dvd player for the holiday season this year, I'm glad I'm not forced into a format that may not be viable in the coming years, I usually buy my gaming machine to play games, I have never used one as a primary movie player, and most adults who set up an HD entertainment system, will not use a game machine as the primary video player.

 

If I feel the need to move past my DVD's I will do so when I have a good reason to, I'm not one to jump on a format, I was alive during the beta/vhs format war, we got a Beta, and ended up propping a door with it I believe, now I wait, lesson learned

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  • 4 weeks later...

yeah, i do agree. i have a xbox 360 premium of my own. it's not worth the upgrade since most of the components in the 360 elite aren't any different than the 360 premium and basic. MS could have introduced integrated wireless card and a hd-dvd drive if they wanted to drive the price up a little further. seeing that i have the premium 360, i see no reason to upgrade.

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  • 1 month later...

I'll only get a 360 when Microsoft have a price drop and they fix the "Red Ring of Death" problem.

 

Taking out 3rd party warranties are a waste of money as below:

 

In the UK we are protected by this:

 

Getting your goods repaired or replaced

 

If there is something wrong with your goods and you aren't entitled to, or don't want to get a full refund, you can ask the trader to either repair or replace them for free instead. You might not be able to get a full refund if, perhaps, you had the goods for too long before realising there was a problem, or before the problem became obvious.

 

If you take the goods back within six months of buying them, the trader must accept that they were faulty at the time of sale and offer to repair or replace them. If the trader doesn't accept that the goods were faulty, they will have to prove this.

 

If you have had your goods for more than six months when they go wrong, you can still ask the trader to repair or replace them, but you may have to prove that they were faulty when you bought them if the trader doesn't agree.

 

You can ask for a repair or replacement at any time up to six years after you bought the goods, as long as it is reasonable for them to have lasted this long. If the goods go wrong after six years, you no longer have the right to ask for a repair or replacement.

 

If the trader agrees to carry out a repair or provide a replacement, they must do this within a reasonable period of time, and without causing you any significant inconvenience.

If you ask the trader for a repair but this turns out to be impractical or to be too expensive, the trader doesn't have to repair your goods, but you can choose to have a replacement instead. In the same way, if you have asked the trader to replace your goods and this turns out to be impractical or too expensive, the trader doesn't have to replace them, but you can choose to have a repair instead.

 

If neither repair or replacement is practical, you can ask to get some or all of your money back. You can also ask to get some or all of your money back if:

 

replacing or repairing the goods would cost more than giving you some or all of your money back, or

the trader did not replace or repair the goods within a reasonable period of time, or

the trader was not able to repair or replace the goods without causing you significant inconvenience.

 

How much money you can get back will depend on how much use you have had out of the goods. You will probably only be able to get some of your money back if:-

 

the goods had worked for some time before they went wrong, or

they still work but their appearance has got worse, or

only one of their functions has failed.

 

However, if you have been able to get no, or little use out of the goods, and/or repairs have been unsuccessful, then you will probably be able to give back the goods and get all of your money back.

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By several metrics, the Xbox 360 is the most successful console so far of this generation. Despite the startling pace of the Wii, the Xbox 360 still has the most consoles sold worldwide and the longest list of games and exclusives. For a gamer looking for online-enabled high-definition gaming today, the Xbox 360 appears to satisfy those needs.

 

One often overlooked factor when considering a console purchase is reliability, an area that is apparently where the Xbox 360 falls short. Anecdotal evidence is heavily pointing to Microsoft’s latest console as being significantly more prone to failure than what consumers are accustomed to.

 

Microsoft has said before that its Xbox 360 failure rate falls within three to five percent, what it believes to be well within industry standards. Internet reports from Xbox 360 owners, however, suggest that the failure rate is much higher than that.

 

In an effort to gain a more accurate picture of Xbox 360 failure rate, DailyTech decided to poll retail outlets that sell the Xbox 360 and with it the option to purchase an in-store extended warranty. Out of all Xbox 360 extended warranties sold, we wanted to know how many were claimed by consumers with defective consoles, thus giving us a more accurate failures percentage.

 

After contacting several retailers from various regions in North America, the responses were unanimous: the Xbox 360 is the least reliable gaming console in recent history. Current EB Games or GameStop employees who offered information did so under strict anonymity, as it is against company policy to reveal such information to the public. Furthermore, our sources confirmed that EB Games revised its Canadian warranty policies during early 2007 for consoles solely due to the failure rate of the Xbox 360.

 

EB Games held conference calls for its Canadian stores informing them of the new policy changes and revealing alarming failure rates of the Xbox 360. “The real numbers were between 30 to 33 percent,” said former EB Games employee Matthieu G., adding that failure rate was even greater for launch consoles. “We had 35 Xbox 360s at launch I know more than half of them broke within the first six months (red lights or making circles under the game discs). Two of them were dead on arrival.”

 

Interestingly, Microsoft has acknowledged that the initial batch of Xbox 360 consoles made during the launch window suffer from below average reliability. In response to an overwhelming defect rate of launch consoles, Microsoft agreed to repair all machines manufactured in 2005 free of charge, and issue a refund for those who already paid for repairs of launch units up until January 1, 2006.

 

The three flashing red lights – commonly referred to in gaming communities as the “Red Ring of Death” – is a sign of an Xbox 360 hardware failure. The sign is apparently common enough that Microsoft has added an option to its 1-800-4MY-XBOX support line that names “three flashing red lights” specifically.

 

As a result of the high failure rate of the Xbox 360, EB Games corporate nearly doubled the prices of its one-year, over-the-counter warranty. While the previous warranty would give a customer a brand new console in exchange for the broken one, the new policy now states that the customer will receive a refurbished console instead. The move was made because it was becoming too costly for the retailer to give the customer a brand-new machine, which still carries a store cost close to the MSRP. The price increase and policy change wasn’t exclusive to only the Xbox 360, however, as it also applies to all other Sony and Nintendo consoles sold.

 

The failure rate nearing a third of all Xbox 360 consoles was found at other retailers too. A Best Buy customer service department manager, who wished to remain unnamed, said that failure rates for the console were “between a quarter to a third” of all units sold.

 

“We see a ton of [Xbox 360s] come back all the time. We strongly push our customers to buy our service plans no matter what they buy, but it is especially important for them with the Xbox 360,” said the manager. “It’s a lucky thing for us that Microsoft extended the factory warranty to one year, because we were having a hell of a time dealing with the launch units. Now we don’t have to deal with those broken [Xbox 360s] until their second year, for those who have purchased the two year plans.”

 

In late 2006, Microsoft boosted the warranty of all Xbox 360 consoles to one year, up from 90-days previously. For gamers who are out of warranty, however, a replacement or repair will cost Xbox 360 customers $140.

 

When compared against other systems, the Xbox 360 is failing at higher rates than its current competitors and predecessors. Former EB Games worker Matthieu G. said that the failure rates for all other consoles were not high enough for the retailer to consider revising its policies, and guesses that most other console systems have a failure rate of less than one percent, including the PlayStation 3. Another EB Games manager, when asked if the store warranty was worth it, conceded that in the hundreds of Wii units sold at that location thus far, zero have come back as defective.

 

Despite the overwhelming evidence that the Xbox 360 is a relatively unreliable games machine, Microsoft officials refuse to comment on its failure rate. Peter Moore, VP of Microsoft’s entertainment division, said to the Mercury News, “I can’t comment on failure rates, because it’s just not something – it’s a moving target. What this consumer should worry about is the way that we’ve treated him. Y’know, things break, and if we’ve treated him well and fixed his problem, that’s something that we’re focused on right now. I’m not going to comment on individual failure rates because I’m shipping in 36 countries and it’s a complex business.”

 

Similar questions regarding the Xbox 360 hardware met with the man responsible for the design of the console, Todd Holmdahl. He too sidestepped the issue with the Mercury News, saying, “I would say we don’t have a high defect rate. The vast majority of people are really excited about their product, and that we are targeting profitability for next year.”

 

Asked differently about whether or not the Xbox 360 falls into the ‘normal’ three to five percent return rate, Holmdahl said, “We don’t disclose the actual number,” and “We don’t comment on that.”

 

No piece of technology, no matter how well designed, should be expected to completely free of failure. The key metric is whether or not a product falls within industry standards of acceptable failure rates – and from findings based off retailer-supported warranty returns, the actual rate of failures could be six to ten times greater than what Microsoft is letting on.

 

Regardless of what the actual failure rate is, there is consumer perception that the Xbox 360 is a less reliable machine than its competitors. That fact alone should encourage Microsoft to do more than just avoid all comments on failures and only preach on the wonderful experience of its consumer base.

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