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Evan1127

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Posts posted by Evan1127

  1. Think of launching a coaster as braking in reverse. Same loads, same everything, just the opposite direction.

     

    There isn't anything about what Rocky Mountain has been doing that has somehow made it possible to launch a wooden coaster. It's been possible since it was possible to launch steel coasters. Rocky Mountain may be favored to do it first, though, because of their layouts and not their track. A park that would want a Rocky Mountain layout over that of a traditional wood coaster may tend to also want a launch.

  2. Rust doesn't form in any non-negligible amount if the concrete remains uncracked. As long as the foundations don't crack, it's not a problem. And if cracks are found quickly enough, they can be sealed.

     

    Shavethewhales, I have to disagree with you on the use of epoxy-coated rebar. Most of the foundations I've seen (which, incidentally, are in the amusement industry) don't have any sort of protection on the rebar, and that's how I remember learning it. Protective coatings on rebar are generally used where there are other factors that may make rusting rebar worse, such as road salts, etc. Epoxy reduces the bonding between rebar and concrete, so it's not ideal to use.

     

    Edit: It's worth noting that uncracked concrete provides sufficient rust protection because the alkalinity of concrete helps to maintain a passive protective layer around the rebar. Cracked concrete loses that protection (and also allows water intrusion).

  3. No need to apologize for asking questions. Frankly, it's helpful to see what people are asking about.

     

    Each rider/player team pays together, so only two payments are received per game in a two-tower setup. We have a "single player" game in the case that only one team is there to play and they don't want to sit around waiting for another (like with other games). The single player game operates more like a hi-striker, in that the striker has three chances to get the rider to the top in a single strike.

     

    As for mixes of paying customers and wrist bands, it has only happened a couple times. If the paying team wins, they get a prize, otherwise no prize is given out.

  4. We've experimented with both separately, and we are now running it as a combination of the two. A wristband will get you on to ride or you can pay like a game with the ability to win a prize. This isn't necessarily how all operators will do it, nor necessarily how we'll continue to do it at Fun Spot, but it seems to be working out well right now.

     

    In all cases, it's been very popular!

  5. Thanks for the continued support, everyone. Let me see if I can clarify anything without giving much away right now.

     

    So to be clear: Skyline Attractions is a vendor/marketing company along the lines of Ride Entertainment Group, and their subsidiary Skyline Design will do R&D, but not necessarily manufacturing? Seems like a wide net to throw, hard to understand from an outside perspective where they are going with this.

     

    The basic setup is that Skyline Design will own the intellectual property to and actually design the products that Skyline Attractions will manufacture and distribute. Any additional design work we do for industry customers - including Great Coasters at their request - will be done by Skyline Design.

     

    I'm seeing a lot of speculations on what types of rides they might design, but I think the answer is right in their logo. Big rides. Tall rides. You know... A ride that would change a parks skyline.

     

    Well, there are some answers in the press release, too, and "ride" isn't the only word we use. I hope we didn't give the impression that we're limiting ourselves.

     

    Either that or made entirely of Skyline Chili.

     

    If only. We played around with that a bit, but couldn't resist and ended up eating our designs.

  6. Hi everyone -- glad to see the positive reactions to Skyline so far, and thanks for the well-wishes. We're pretty excited. I'll try to answer some of the questions..

     

    Soooooooo are they hiring or are they just asking people to send in their pie-in-the-sky ideas? Because either way I like that they're openly asking for extra help to keep the industry moving forward.

     

    I guess neither at the moment, but we'll be hiring eventually (sooner rather than later). Once we do, we'll be looking for passionate and creative people to help us grow.

     

    Speaking of GCI, uhm, what happens to them now?

     

    We'll be consulting with them at their request, and there are still great and talented people working there.

     

    Interesting to see how this "spin-off" will turn out. Will it go like the Schwarzkopf spin-off Gerstlauer or the Vekoma spin-off KumBak???

     

    Don't think "spin-off".

     

    Since the name has "attractions in the title, I guess its safe to assume they won't just be doing coasters?

     

    Correct. We have a huge range of ideas.

  7.  

    According to the Wanda site the Nanchan wooden ride (Viper revealed by GCI at IAAPA) has now begun manufacturing so hopefully we shall see this go up soon. It looks like it could be a top 10.

     

    Wait, did they redesign the ending for Viper or is this a different coaster altogether? What am I missing?

     

    The image shown was part of an earlier proposal. The layout remains unchanged from what was announced at IAAPA:

     

  8. I think I qualify for the first to be addicted to the White Lightning. Yesterday evening GCI wanted to log some laps on the trains, so I went along for the ride. I now have 35 runs, 25 of them in a row. The more I rode, the more I liked it. You literally float through the right bank at the bottom of the drop. What a great ride!

     

    Inspection today!

     

    Great to hear! (I agree wholeheartedly!)

  9. Regarding the name of the our ride at Knight Valley:

     

    Before we left the site, they had the ride listed on their park maps as 飞跃巅峰, which our translators helped us translate to Mountain Flyer (the raw form is a bit less graceful). We confirmed with the park later that they would use "Mountain Flyer" as the English translation of the ride name.

     

    After we left the site, they put a sign up at the ride reading 木质过山车, which is just "wood coaster". The best I can figure is that they wanted to make a more descriptive sign since wood coasters are so new to the country. Whether or not they removed all references to the original 飞跃巅峰 we don't know, but it's still Mountain Flyer to us.

  10. ^As mentioned on the previous page, I'm hoping to make it out to GWW this weekend, weather permitting.

    I do have faith though in GCI as they seem to post new stuff by the end of the weeks on their Facebook page (Here's hoping for a nice lunchtime update tomorrow ). I wouldn't expect any updates from the park itself until after the new year since I believe they've had the holiday weeks off.

     

    Sorry, our guys are enjoying a bit of R&R, too.

  11. This was asked recently on our Facebook page:

     

    Our response:

    There are many reasons to consider when to use each, but what it basically comes down to is what is simplest, given the site, terrain, and soil conditions.

     

    A slab foundation will typically be used if the terrain is flat or nearly flat. Slabs tend to be simpler to construct/form, and they are especially helpful where we have a lot of structure anchoring close together. The soil conditions will sometimes indicate that a slab is better suited, but that is not as common.

     

    The individual footers you see are actually connected underground with what we call "strip footings" or "grade beams". You will see these primarily when the ground is not as flat and it is impractical (or impossible) to use a slab foundation.

     

    Aesthetics comes into play sometimes, too, but that is not typically a major factor.

  12. I've searched this thread for a similar question (sorry if I missed it -- I find repetitive info as annoying as the next guy), but I'm wondering if some frequent visitors to DCA could provide a couple quick tips for getting the most out of a full day at the park. I'm going Friday with my girlfriend and want to make sure we don't miss the truly unique parts of the park. Besides rides, we know we should see World of Color. We're also trying to scope out a good place for dinner.

     

    We're doing DL on Saturday, but I'm less concerned about that, since we've both been.

     

    I appreciate any help we can get. Thanks.

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